Saturday, 24 July 2021

Just a feeling

 This kind of weather seems to fill the air with a kind of apprehension - as though everyone is waiting for something to happen and as though that happening might not be very good.   In fact I think a good thunderstorm might clear the air once and for all and make us all feel more 'normal'.

Priscilla and I walked around 'the circuit 'at half past eight this morning, before many folk were about and while the air was cool, almost chilly , but it was still tiring.   I came back to a coffee and an hour with The Times, a wander round a thirsty garden, and just recently a lunch.  Walking round I contemplated what to write about on my post today but had no inspiration at all.  I will be back later when something might have sprung up and hit me between the eyes (don't mean that literally)

I spent an hour in the garden this afternoon with just my scissors, cuttting back and dead heading plants.   The Osteospermum has been great this year - it has been out for weeks and weeks but this week's hot, dry weather has finally finished it off.   I have five large clumps and there were dozens of sagging, dying pink heads so they had to come off.   Luckily I could reach them all from the patio without going up any stairs (strictly forbidden.)  Then there are another four Gallardia plants, now in full flower and again some flowers are beginning to die, so they need to be cut off to encourage new flowers to form.   So it was round with the scissors again.   You might think it silly using scissors rather than my secateurs but when I am also trimming back the plants to make nice, neat cushions and also balancing and trying to hold on to Priscilla (or sit on her seat when possible) scissors seem safer and easier to use.

There is no sign of rain although earlier in the week the weathermen said there would be rain up here by the weekend.   Thunder and lightning is everywhere down South but no sign up here and although some was forecast for tomorrow that too seems to have disappeared.   Last words on tonight's weather report were, 'next week is set to be cooler and wetter' - well I hope so and my plants do too.

See you tomorrow (figuratively speaking of course)

 

27 comments:

Rachel Phillips said...

I can't believe the amount of dead heading you have to do. Mind blowing. As for the rest of it, it's only Summer weather, nothing more, don't over think it.

Joan (Devon) said...

Doesn't Priscilla have a compartment under the seat where you can carry your secauteurs?

Heather said...

Dead heading really does make plants flower much longer and is a nice gentle task. Your garden must be looking lovely.
The forecast thunderstorms which last week seemed to be so menacing, are now reduced to 'not all areas will have a storm'. We will see.
Hopefully I will regain a little energy next week if it stays cooler.

gz said...

You're doing a good job!
Looks like we are in for another week of dry weather here..at least that should get the onions ready to lift! Then can we have some gentle steady nocturnal rain please!!

CharlotteP said...

Our promised rain has disappeared from the forecast, too...everyone feels quite cheated!
I have to remind myself not to moan; we are so lucky compared to many places overseas.

Minigranny said...

We've had a few showers and a rumble or two of thunder in Somerset. Have a good sleep after all your exertions.

the veg artist said...

I find it quite therapeutic dead-heading roses, and I always use an old kitchen scissors. It gives a nice, neat finish, but the main thing for me is that it makes my reach about 4 or 5 inches longer when stretching over the bushes. We had thunder yesterday, but no rain, and it's much cooler and fresher now.

The Weaver of Grass said...

qz - weather girl tonight said ' a much cooler and damper week ahead - I hope so

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes - Priscilla has a shopping bag. I just didn't need my secateurs today.

Rachel - I think what is annoying me about the lack of rain is that I had just spent £100 on plants for the piece we are planting up and I don't want them to die.

Rachel Phillips said...

They'll live.0

Rachel Phillips said...

That O was a typo.

Anonymous said...

I have a long row of Iceberg roses along the front fence. They flower prolifically most of the year so need constant dead heading, which is indeed therapeutic, but I must look like the nosy old neighbour using it as an excuse to observe what's going on!
( neighbours here are on a 'brief nod' acquaintance only.) I sincerely wish those roses were around the back of the house.
I love my garden, and my privacy...though it all takes a bit of getting used to, as my parents neighbours were in and out of each others houses most of the time when I was growing up, and as an adult, country living meant long pleasant talks with everyone.
Pam, South Australia.

Granny Sue said...

Your first comments say perfectly what it feels like here sometimes. Today is a good example. The sky looks brassy, there's an uneasy breeze, the humidity is high, and I feel like I'm waiting for something. We need rain badly, and tomorrow thunderstorms are predicted. They're not the ideal rain but I'll take anything at this point. Then the rest of the week looks dry. Bummer.

Susan said...

It sounds like you have done a very thorough job pruning. Heat and no rain has a terrible impact on what were previously healthy plants. Hopefully, your trimming will help to refuel the plants. Our July broke all records for rain. It's cool and sunny here today.

Joanne Noragon said...

My plants all look so nice, and I've even had neighbors comment on the pleasantness this year of looking at the riot of color: red, white, pink, orange, purple.....

EM Griffith said...

Living in California means no rain from spring until late fall or early winter. We have a wet season and a dry one. The latter has also become fire season in recent years. Drought is back, so water is being restricted in some areas. Farmers will see the worst effects. In my yard, the roses get enough water to keep them going. They look sun scorched. I often marvel at the amount of rain the U.K. receives throughout the year.

Cro Magnon said...

We'd been promised storms and rain for the past few days, but nothing. We are now promised rain for today and tomorrow, but we'll see! I love summer, and I love swimming, but a good overnight downpour would be very welcome.

Bovey Belle said...

No storms here either, and not one spot of much-needed rain either. Whilst I don't want a tropical storm, I would like a break from watering round morning and evening! Thank heavens for hoses is all I can say.

I must dead-head my Cosmos - they have been flowering all summer long and bringing such colour to the stable yard. Now "Tess" rose is flowering amazingly and as she is a climber I need to get a piece of trellis for her to climb up, having used the piece we got from a garage clearance down by the Doc's for my Wisteria. I like to use scissors for the thinner-stemmed plants and secateurs for the roses etc.

This hot weather has seen me delving into our Manx family history, and I will now start to feel guilty as it's not too hot to do the things that NEED doing!!

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I've never heard any research to back it up, but I'm sure that we retain some kind of sense of approaching thunderstorms that makes us feel nervous and jittery. I remember feeling really anxious once when walking a ridge in the Lake District, even though it was a clear blue sky. I decided to go downhill sooner than planned and within half an hour there were cracks of thunder sounding all around and then a heavy downpour. You can't do too much dead-heading if you want your flowers to last a long time. My Osteospermum are doing OK but some others are looking a bit stressed by the hot weather.

Sue in Suffolk said...

9am Sunday morning and still no sign of the rain/thunderstorms mentioned on the forecast.

the veg artist said...

I know you know this, Weave, but some readers may not. Dead-heading is not just about removing unsightly flowers that are going over. Allowing them to form seed sends a message to the plant that it's done its job, and can stop producing flowers now. Dead-heading, and thereby removing the reproductive base of the flower tells the plant that it needs to produce more flowers. This is particularly true of roses and sweet-peas.

Rachel Phillips said...

Reading through the comments, veg artist, I dont see anybody expressing that they do not understand deadheading or perhaps you are just helping those who read but haven't commented so far.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes veg artist - I did know - growing sweet peas is pointless unless you cut the flowers three or four times a week - they just go to seed. I find with many plants which are perennial dead heading to the base neatens the plant up so that even if they don't produce any more flowers they make neat cushions of leaves which are pleasant to look
at.
John - not sure about jittery before storms but agree about dead heading.
BB I intend to water my pots with the hose after tea tonight = expect it won't be long here before there is a ban on them.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks Rachel - I hope you are right.

jinxxxygirl said...

Hi Pat!

I LOVE deadheading... I find it so relaxing and the instant gratification is fabulous.. My favorite time of day to this is at dusk... I don't know why but its my favorite time of day to be out in garden... putting it to bed so to speak.. I also LOVE that feeling you get just before a storm.. I love to be outside then.. when the wind is picking up and the dark clouds are rolling in but the rain hasn't fallen yet.. Great post Pat... Hugs! deb

Crafty Green Poet said...

Up in Edinburgh we could certainly do with some rain, it's been unnaturally hot and dry for a long time now (a long time of course being relative, this is Edinburgh after all)

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