Wednesday, 24 June 2009

A Lovely Day Out.
















We have visitors staying from The Netherlands and yesterday we took them over towards the North York Moors to the beautiful Abbey at Rievaulx. The setting is exquisite. Eight centuries ago St Aelred - the third abbot - wrote "Everywhere peace, everywhere serenity, and a marvellous freedom from the tumult of the world." I would say that nothing of that has changed.





The abbey was founded by St Bernard of Clairvaux - twelve Clairvaux mnonks came here in 1132 and there has been an Abbey on this site ever since. I have put on just three photographs for you to see. A distance shot of the newer (relatively) part of the building, an interior shot (although of course there is now no roof) and a shot of a perfectly formed bird's nest which had blown down from somewhere on the masonry - what a beautiful piece of architecture that nest is too!
Then we made a short detour to St Gregory's Minster in Kirkdale. There has been a church on this site since about 750. The sundial in the photograph is Anglo-Saxon and it tells us that the church was rebuilt in 1055. There is a sense of peace and tranquility here too. There are very early sarcophogae inside and the coolness was wonderful after the scorching heat outside.
I hope you enjoy this brief tour.
Thanks to all those who participated in Mug Monday - and to all those who commented on my blog. I am very limited for time this week but I will visit you all within the next few days. Meanwhile - enjoy this lovely sunny weather while it lasts - the farmer is busy making hay (while the sun shines) so our friends, who have their caravan in one of our hay fields, are going to sleep at night to the very English scent of new mown hay. A brief PS after seeing the daisy in the nest photograph - a translation for what the dutch call daisies is "May kisses" - don't you think that's lovely?

17 comments:

steven said...

hi weaver, i have visited rieveaulx three times in my life. each time it has left me filled both awestruck and filled with peace. it is an extraordinary place steeped with history. your pictures of it are really good and take me back to some very special times!! have a peaceful day!! steven

Dave King said...

We've been in the area a couple of times, but never actually got to the Abbey. A great disappointment, but your post helps fill the gap by enabling me to visit vicariously. Thanks.

Derrick said...

Hello Weaver,

I recognise this place! But for you it was both open and sunny! In the rather dull conditions when I saw it, the abbey had something of a doleful air. But "everywhere peace" is very appropriate!

Arija said...

Lovely abbey, but by the look of things no matter how peaceful it was at the start or is nw, there was a rather desperate time in between. Lovely photos of the very gothic structure with its soaring arches.

The funeral in Friday so I probably won't get to blog much in the next few days ... the round trip is a good 1,500 miles and three sleep overs en route.

Enjoy your friends and beautiful summer weather while it lasts.

Poet in Residence said...

That's interesting about the daisies in Dutch.
In German speaking lands daisies are called in translation 'geese flowers'. But I've no idea why. Do you think maybe geese like to eat them? Dandelions, as a matter of interest, are called 'Lion's Teeth'!

Elizabeth said...

A wonderful virtual visit.
We could do with some of that peace here!

Jane Moxey said...

So much wonderful ancient history in Britain! I miss that living here in the US. Thanks for the lovely pictures and interesting post.

Heather said...

I have never seen Rieveaulx other than in photos, but would love to one day. You have taken us on a lovely day out - thankyou so much. It's good to know that St.Aelred's words still hold true today and I love the name of 'May kisses' for daisies.

Amy said...

That is beautiful! I have dreams of visiting England, Scotland and Ireland and seeing ruins and castles like that. We just don't have the same history here in NZ.

Karen said...

What beautiful photographs, I love reading about your journeys..hope to see some of them one day myself.

Leenie said...

The British Isles have so much history compacted in such a small area! This abbey is another example of how people managed to put together beautiful architecture despite severe conditions. Thanks for the post. BTW if you are still wondering...the bird that is so clever with transporting worms is a robin. They are so common here I did not think to identify him.

acornmoon said...

Enjoy your visitors, a chance to see things through a tourist's eyes and a great way to rediscover local delights.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thank you for all the comments - glad you liked Rievaulx. I am now so far behind with reading your blogs that this is a thanks to everyone and now I can get back to reading all of you! Normal service will be resumed tomorrow.

Welcome To Wilmoth Farms said...

Oh WOW! Such lovely photos! As I stated in my comment on your last post I love seeing those old old buildings! Such character and beauty!

Brenda Jean said...

What beautiful pictures in this post and the above ones too! Thanks so much for sharing. I have always loved church architechture and cemeteries!

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

Oh, I have never made it to Rievaulx! I must add it to my list. It is indeed exquisite.

BT said...

Oh what a wonderful place to visit. Jim knows it well, but I've never been there. Next time I'm in the area, definitely. You have obviously entertained your visitors beautifully.