Monday, 29 June 2009

Too hot!!
















Today it is very hot here and the forecast is for it to getter hotter each day this week. I do not like very hot weather and am keeping indoors between 11am and 3pm when the sun is at its hottest. So there is a limited post today.
I went down into the garden to collect a bunch of herbs for lunch - marjoram, parsley, sage, chives, mint, oregano and thyme - somehow just smelling those herbs made me feel cooler (sure it is all in the mind!). The buddleia is in full bloom - not the purple one but this lovely orange one. I counted over fifty bumble bees on it. I know it isn't a plant for the vegetable garden but there are so many bees on it that it must be good for the fertilisation of the flowering broad beans!
Outside the back door, on the Calf House, the climbing rose is just coming into bloom and smells delightful. It is Alexander Girault and I have spent half an hour on the computer trying to find out who Alexander Girault was - does anybody out there know? Whoever he was then this lovely rose means that his name lives on.
The fucshia and the marguerites outside the back door (it is shady there for most of the day) are also in full bloom. So that is today's photography done for you to enjoy.
The farmer is also feeling the heat. Our heifers are in the field next to our neighbouring farmer's dairy herd and they would dearly like to be together. It's funny isn't it - animals have no concept of boundaries at all. The rabbits hop from A to B to C regardless of who the fields belong to. And similarly the cattle -they crowd round the gate between the two fields and, when it doesn't miraculously open for them, they crash through the wooden fence into the little wood, scramble over the beck, crash through another fence and get in that way. Together with the cows at last - that's the herd instinct coming to the fore and they are all happy.
Well not now, as the farmer has spent the morning creating a new heifer-proof fence so that they are now back where they belong.
Are humans alone in wanting to own things and then to put fences and barriers around their possessions in order to stop others getting at them? Wouldn't it be nice sometimes to live in a society where no-one owned anything and therefore no-one was possessive. I thought of the nomadic Bedou in the desert, moving from place to place but even they guard their possessions (including their wives!) when they up sticks and move on.
And, thinking about it, Tess has about ten toys - balls, squeakers, chews - and woebetide anyone who tries to take one of them - she is on them like a ton of bricks. Oh dear - I have just destroyed my whole argument haven't I? It isn't just human nature.
Keep cool. PS I forgot to mention Alberinte - she is also in full bloom and smelling superb.

39 comments:

Leilani Lee said...

Of course we are not the only creatures to stake out territories and defend them... the fuschia is beautiful (note to self: why don't you get yourself a fuschia!) Hot! Hot! here as well... Miserably hot... Oh to be wealthy enough to have a summer house in a cool place... my "word verification" is "nocarde". Which reminds me that I was refused a glass of beer recently in a restaurant because I didn't have my ID with me.

steven said...

hello weaver! look at those stunning flowers!!! i read on the beeb's internet service that it was getting hot where you are. we just finished a few days in the high twenty-nines and seem destined for some cooler days.
as for the herding or clustering of living things. i wonder why they need to. i know that animals will do a lot to be together, but why? perhaps it's for a fresh perspective or news they haven't already heard! have a peaceful and cool day. steven

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

Edward loves his toys, too. However, he is not protective of them and will allow anyone to play that wishes to.

I so agree with you about a distaste for the very hot weather. As does Edward. We stay inside and gaze wistfully out the window, remembering cooler days. And we never complain about the cold!

Gorgeous fuschia, though. It obviously loves the heat!!

Phoenix said...

Interesting thought, about the want to own and build fences.. or rather not wanting it.
And the hot weather.. ask the likes of me in tropical India...ughh literally boiling in 110 temperatures, desperately waiting for that first shower of rain!

Bee said...

I've very much enjoyed reading about what's in bloom there (and the hot weather, of course). I'm always intrigued by rose names, too; but alas, I can't tell you anything about Girault.

Reader Wil said...

Hi Weaver! I can see the heifers crashing through the fence! It must have been a hot job to get them back where they belonged. Your flowers are doing well! Thanks for your tour around the garden. It's good to stay indoors when the heat is unbearable.

Dominic Rivron said...

I thought most mammals marked their territory by peeing around the border form time to time. It's perhaps a relief that humans build walls instead but if we did it that way and it was what we were used to, I don't suppose we'd raise an eyebrow.

Heather said...

I can cope with 'hot' but not when it is accompanied by 'humid'. It's sad isn't it - we spend months of the year longing to be warm, then when we get a spell of real summer weather we are driven indoors! Your roses and other flowers look so lovely Weaver, your garden must be beautiful. I can't help you with the rose name. Hope the heifers are behaving themselves and that you and the farmer have a shady spot to relax in.

willow said...

Very hot and humid over the weekend here in Ohio. Cooler today with a little breeze...ahh.

MarmaladeRose said...

Lovely flowers Weaver. Yes we are sooo lucky to live here. I want to share it with the world!

Raph G. Neckmann said...

Ah, Weaver, we giraffes do love the heat! Although we do have a few cool spots in Necky Knoll House - notably the cellar where the Stiffnex band practise. You've be welcome to have a cup of tea with us there, but you may find the music a little noisy!!

I love your flower photos. The Buddleia globosa is one of my favourite shrubs.

Your heifer story is so amusing!

gleaner said...

I think animals probably mark there territory in many fascinating and surprising ways to us humans, like Dominic mentioned, peeing to mark their territory etc. and cats, don't they rub their bodies against the legs of humans to spread their scent and mark you.
Absolutely beautiful photos and a delightful post about the antics of your heifers.

Elizabeth said...

Sorry you are so hot but your garden seems to be flourishing in spite of it all.
Is it just me or does the bee situation seem a little better this year?
Warmer here too........

Penny said...

Our dairy cows get into the garden whenever they think they can, usually when we have a new dairy employee and he forgets a gate. It is amazing how about 400 cows can tippy toe past the bedroom window until one low moo and we are both out of bed! They make such an awful mess.
Your roses look magnificent, and how you can grow fuchsias like that! I always envy any one who can grow them in baskets. Far too dry through the summer here.
My oldest grand daughter is heading for the UK on Sunday, she is the Australian Welsh pony Ambassador, for this year, the first time it has been run, I keep telling her it has been hot but they say the Royal Welsh is usually wet. I hope she sees lots of lovely pony studs and lovely country as well.

Arija said...

Ijust tried to find Alexander Girault for you but in spite of having just bought a lovely book on 'Naming the Rose', it is not mentioned there either.
Isn't Albertine a beauty? My g-daughter has one that drapes itself scross half the front of their house.
We are having a winter storm today with spring temperatures and the grass covering everything in the garden is up to my knees...so what, to-morrow is another day..

Leenie said...

Love the flower photos. Good luck with those heifers.

Welcome To Wilmoth Farms said...

the flowers are fabulous! And your photography is awesome as always! That cattle! LOL they are funny yet leave us tired with their rambunctious behavior! LOL I agree...not worrying about the grass being greener on the other side would be great...we should take the cows lead!

Crafty Green Poet said...

Animals are very possessive, but they generally don't have anywhere near as many possessions....

Titus said...

I am in sympathy with you regarding the weather!
I was wondering if the Girault surname had anything to do with the artist's pastels company?

Jenn Jilks said...

I love the heat, Weaver! We have cooled down this week. Rain for a few days, which is needed. Our lake is low. Great flowers!!!!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes LL - I love the cool too. Do you have ID cards? We have not fallen into that bracket yet.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Nice thought steven, that they might be swopping up to the minute news - but I fear it is much more prosaic than that - they are a herd animal and do not care to be alone.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Pamela - I have just ventured out in the heat for Tess's walk and we have both come back absolutely worn out.

The Weaver of Grass said...

I don't think I could bear 110 degrees Phoenix - I think I should just melt away.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for visiting Bee.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks reader wil - hope you are managing to keep cool.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Dominic - significantly it is the males who do this I think - although I am surprised to see how often my little bitch terrier does it. I suppose it boils down to the fact that we are all territorial - even robins fight from tree to tree.

The Weaver of Grass said...

The trouble with shady spots Heather is that they tend to have gnats, flies or whatever - and any winged insect seems to be able to smell me a mile away!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Willow - hot in Ohio too - this old sun seems to have gotten everywhere.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Marmalade Rose - let us bask in the joys of life in the Dales eh?

The Weaver of Grass said...

Raph - I love the idea of the Stiffnex band - what instruments do they play I wonder.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for the comments Gleaner.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Elizabeth - we have a bumble bees nest in the floor of our hay barn - and there seem to be a lot going in and out - maybe it is a good year for them.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Very best wishes to your grand-daughter on her first visit ot the Royal Welsh Show - hope the weather is gorgeous and that she has an interesting time, Penny.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Arija - you sound in good spirits - I am so glad about that.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks to all of you - I do love the way you all join in the debate - it makes blogging worth while!

Derrick said...

I was going to say, Weaver, that many creatures are territorial, even though they may not be able to put up gates and fences. They certainly try to ward off incomers!

Your flowers look lovely. The sunshine is good for some things! It was very hot in London over the weekend.

BT said...

I read this post the other day and can't imagine why I didn't post. I must have got diverted - I often do. I love that buddleia with the orange pom poms, I must get one. I've liked it for years but not seen one for sale.

I've sent Jim the 'name of the rose' so he'll have a look for you. It's certainly spectacular. In fact, your garden must look blissful right now.

Fuchsia, Fuchsia, Fuchsia. Repeat after me......... If you say it with the 'rude word' at the beginning, you can't go wrong. Jim used to have a sign on his off wall, 'For F...'s sake it's Fuchsia'!! You get the idea.

Twisted willow said...

Alexandre Girault is a wonderful rose - Alexandre is spelt the French way which is a hint to it's origin. I thought it might have been bred by the Meilland company in Antibes but it was actually bred by Rene Barbier who took the Wichuraiana climbing rose from the States and crossed it with Hybrid Tea types from Europe to retain the same climbing characteristics but with much more showy flowers. He started this in the 1880s and an number of varietes were released in the 1900s including Alexandre Girault in 1909. Others were: Alberic Girault, Elisa Robichon, Francois Foucaud and not surprisingly one called Rene Barbier. I suspect from that list that they were all named after family and friends, so Alexandre Girault might just have been a cousin - or perhaps even the local butcher - but I don't think he was anyone famous.