Friday, 19 June 2009

Farming around the world.







Wherever we go in the world we try to bring back images of farming. I have posted some before, a long time ago. Here are three more. It is the farmer's birthday tomorrow and we are having a little lunch party with our friends from The Netherlands - so time is short today - I am trying to get all the preparations done today.



1. A buttercup field at King's Landing in Maritime Canada - this is a museum village - absolutely fascinating to walk round. This field is part of the village farm. Our fields are full of buttercups at the moment and although they look lovely, according to the farmer they do not make good hay.
2. A Farmers' Market in Funchal, Madeira, where the produce and the flowers were so fresh - I wish this was smellyvision because the smell of fresh strawberries vied with the smell of beautiful flowers.
3. Reindeer farming at Nordkapp in Norway. This very bleak landscape, well above the Arctic Circle. is home to the Sami people and to their herds of reindeer. We were there for the Summer Solstice, six years ago this very week-end and the young reindeer had just been born.
I think farmers feel an affinity with other farmers wherever they go in the world. Each kind of farm is different, each has its problems but one thing is certain - they are all jolly hard work.
Enjoy a pleasant week-end everyone.

18 comments:

Heather said...

A good variety of farms here Weaver. I seem to remember from childhood that cows don't eat buttercups so farmers wouldn't welcome them in the hay. I guessed that the top picture was Canada. I have only been once, but it was the fence which gave me the clue - very distinctive. I hope tomorrow will be a good day for your farmer, and wish him a very Happy Birthday with no buttercups in his hay!

acornmoon said...

I hope you have a good birthday celebration. I can still smell the honeysuckle from your last post.

Amy said...

I love seeing what different places around the world look like- enjoy your weekend :-)
btw in case you're wondering how I found your blog, I'm a friend of Liz's - I live near her.

Coastcard said...

What a fascinating post. What a lot we can learn from different places. I'm hoping to go to a poetry workshop in the Dylan Thomas Centre tomorrow led by poets from Wales, Catalonia and USA!

Cloudia said...

Bless the farmers!
Aloha-

Cloudia's Comfort Spiral

Crafty Green Poet said...

Good selection of photos, the young reindeer is so sweet....

Woman in a Window said...

Very cool. And you know, my heart actually leapt at that first shot. I laughed to see it from Canada. Guess it's right in my blood!

Robyn said...

The Canadian farm is so pretty. Enjoy the birthday lunch!

Derrick said...

Hello Weaver,

Certainly a wealth of buttercups in the fields around us too. There are horses and donkeys and llamas(!) in them and I keep wondering if they will eat the flowers?

Have a great celebration tomorrow.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes Heather - I meant to mention the fence - we found the same kind of fences in America too - I love them,, they are so rustic.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks acornmoon - am looking forward to MM tomorros.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for the comment and the info Amy.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Look forward to hearing about the poetry workshop, Caroline.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Well said Cloudia.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Juliet - the wonders of the internet that we can "snap" and the picture can be on the blog and around the world in minutes.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Glad you recognised it as Canada, woman in a window! It is my favourite country.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks Robin - we did enjoy the birthday lunch with old friends.

Derrick - we have llamas near here too and also camels - they seem to be sad away from desert regions.

Driftwood & Turtles said...

I am a New Brunswicker and began visiting King's Landing a little more than 25 years ago - about 10 years before moving within an hours or so drive from the historical settlement. Between Christmas parties with co-workers, Thanksgiving dinners with family, the spring maple sugaring, the fall auction and a week my daughter spent as a visiting cousin a dozen or so years ago it has been a part of our family's special times.

My daughter’s husband’s family, Dutch farmers who immigrated to Canada after World War II, lost their farm as part of the expropriation that took place for the “Mactaquac Dam Project which began in the 1960s. The New Brunswick government, in an attempt to meet rising demands for electric energy, decided to build a dam across the St. John River at Mactaquac and create a headpond that would extend 100 kilometres up river to Woodstock.” http://www.kingslanding.nb.ca/english/history.htm

A beautiful place which holds sad memories for some.

I'm a huge fan of "MY LIFE WITH BUSTER" and linked my way to your blog from there.