Thursday, 25 June 2009

Churches
















We are so lucky here in the UK that we have so many magnificent ancient churches to see. Our friends from Holland love them too. Yesterday we thought we would have a "gentle" day, so we just drove the ten miles to the little town of Masham to look at the lovely church there.
This morning our friends have moved on so that they can explore the beauties of York before returning to The Netherlands, so today is a day for me to catch up on reading my bloggy pals.
But here first for your enjoyment are a few of yesterday's photographs.





In the churchyard stands a fragment of an Anglo Saxon pillar.
Inside the church there is a beautiful embroidered altar cloth - I have put that on for the embroiderers out there.
My favourite part of the church is the ancient tomb of Sir Marmaduke Wyvill and his wife
.I love these ancient tombs. It is as though they felt they could live for ever through this effigy in stone. Sir Marmaduke and his wife lie on a marble plinth surrounded by iron railings. They are looking out into the church and Sir M is leaning nonchallantly on his hand as though he is basking in the grass on a sunny day. They are supported by the kneeling figures of their six sons. It wasn't easy to photograph the whole tomb and the reflection of the light on the marble made the photograph much too light. But here is a close up of both husband and wife.
And finally a new stained-glass window was commissioned a few years ago. I think it is magnificent - it incorporates various aspects of Dales life - there is the curlew and the swallow, the local sheep breed, various local wild plants, stone wall - everything which goes to make up our beautiful countryside. As you can see from the photograph there is the clearest deep blue which looks tremendous with the sun shining through it.
Now I am off to catch up on reading other blogs - I haven't even finished reading the Mug Monday posts yet - didn't people respond well to the idea?

22 comments:

steven said...

hellow weaver, a beautiful post. the churches of england are indeed splendid to visit. you mention masham, now isn't that also the location of a certain brewery that manufactures olde peculier?! was there a side visit perhaps or was this an entirely sacred visit! steven

Derrick said...

Morning Weaver,

Nice photographs! Marmaduke is a great name isn't it? The Brits know how to pick 'em!

Professor Yaffle said...

Our churches are a national treasure. Not only are they a joy to behold but their environs,especially those of cathedrals, bring us much needed peace.
I am not only lucky enough to live in the country where beauty and peace abounds but also right next door to a Norman church.

Poet in Residence said...

Sir Marmaduke may be leaning almost nonchalantly on his right hand but it's his left hand I'm a little bit concerned about §:-)~ or rather Weaver I have a little question: what exactly is he holding in it? I mean that knobbly thing.

Pondside said...

Two beautiful posts - you must be wonderful hosts and your friends from the Netherlands are lucky guests!

Hildred and Charles said...

Love the altar and the altar cloth, - we are in the midst of being de-Anglisized in our Ecumenical church and I miss the beauty.

Thank you for these wonderful postings of English churches Weaver, - so much history.....

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes Steven - The Black Sheep Brewery is there and also Theakstons. And no we didn't pay them a visit but have plenty of their bottled stuff at home.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Derrick - it is a not uncommon name round here - usually shortened to Duke.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Prof Yaffle - isn't it wonderful to live in the country - IU couldn't bear to be in a town these days.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Poet - I must say you ade me look at that photograph with new eyes!!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Pondside - thanks for the comment - our guests have gone today and I miss their company already.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Hildred and Charles - glad you liked the altar cloth - I think it is magnificent but some don't care for it.

Welcome To Wilmoth Farms said...

The architecture there just amazes me every thime I see photos. Pretty cool tomb as well!

Heather said...

Masham church is so beautiful. The stained glass window and the Saxon pillar are both wonderful and Sir Marmaduke and his Lady look very tranquil in their lovely setting. I wonder what they would make of the mad world we now live in.

gleaner said...

These posts are enjoyable and remind me of my visits to England -funny when I reflect back, as a 20-something I was interested in visiting the churches rather than do what other 20-somethings were doing on their noisy travels.

Oh, Marmaduke is certainly a great name.

Dominic Rivron said...

Great minds think alike. I too wondered what it was Marmaduke was holding onto. I think we should be told.

:)

Cloudia said...

I share your joy in these ancient places. wonderful post, Dear.
aloha-

Comfort Spiral

Amy said...

Gorgeous! I am loving the historical photos you're sharing! Just to think of the history and the peoples lives when they lived. wow!

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

Such magnificent stained glass windows. Just beautiful. You are indeed fortunate to have so many amazing churches to visit in the UK.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for the comments everyone - visitors have gone (how I miss them, they are such good fun) - now it is a round of providing drinks and food for the workers - it is thirsty work in this hot spell.
Marmaduke - shortened to Duke - is quite a common name round here.
Incidentally he is holding a sword in the photograph!

Woman in a Window said...

Sir M is so nonchalant...and for all of eternity, too.

Gorgeous stained glass.

BT said...

Another super post Weaver. I love churches too, every one has something interesting inside or out. That alter cloth is just beautiful. I am still trying to catch up on blogs from my jaunt to my son's.