Wednesday, 2 June 2021

Another blissful day

 Another blissful day - wall to wall sunshine, air full of the smell of new mown grass and the sound of happy birdsong, nobody in a rush and all car windows wide open.   I must say on the whole we don't get all that much summer weather here in the UK but when we do get a spell of it we make the most of it.   In the last few days I have seen more mens' bare legs than I have seen for a long, long time.   Very few of them exciting.   We are an estate on the whole of retired folk and legs don't age all that well on whichever sex we are looking at - some would say they are best left covered.   But a bit of sun on them does them good and who the hell cares anyway?

When my son and daughter in law came for lunch yesterday my daughter in law brought me an agapanthus seedling - she is a keen gardener but like me, because of lack of mobility she has to have a gardener (the same one as me).   I am now going to have my lunch (a lovely salad left by my carer) and then have a read up on how to nurture it.   I will be back later.

Right - the spirit is willing having read up about the agapanthus - but as yet the flesh is weak.   I shall plant it on some time today - it is in a tiny pot and wants a bit of space and nurture to grow.

When I took the seedling  out of its pot it was very rootbound - the tiny pot was full of thick, healthy-looking roots but they were far too interwoven to separate.   I have potted it up in Levingtons in a larger pot, given it a good water with rainwater sunk the pot into the ground in full sun right at the front of the border where I can keep an eye on it.   Now it must take its chance.

Educational 'top up' is all over the newpapers today.  I have no desire to enter into a political argument as I try to stick to my 'no politics' blog, but as a retired teacher, particular one whose whole career was based around children with some kind of special need - from English as a second language through to reading and learning difficulties - I am saddened already  to know that it is the children from under privileged homes, from inner city schools, who will suffer.   Middle class parents have made sure their children have the right equipment, the right facilities and the right encouragement to keep up on the whole.   I know this is a generalisation and there will be many exceptions in both camps - but it is a problem that has always been there and will not go away.

Until tomorrow dear friends.......

 

 

20 comments:

Rachel Phillips said...

I understood that there is to be extra tutoring for all who need it.

Bovey Belle said...

Enjoy the Agapanthus - I am sure it will flourish with you. I was tempted to buy a (small) pot in town the other day, but when the price was queried it was £10, so I thought I would rather spend that £10 on two or three lesser plants (which I did at Malvern).

I am agin extra-long teaching days for children who have missed out on their schooling. I don't think it will benefit them as they will become too tired to assimilate more knowledge. As you rightly said, it is always the children from socially deprived homes who will suffer. There is one young family I know who will certainly have been left to watch tv whilst their feckless mother sits on the sofa and complains about bad health and about being expected to teach her children when she knows nothing herself . . .

Our sunshine had a rest today - a little rain and a distant clap of thunder instead - but at least newly-planted plants will have benefitted and the sun is returning tomorrow. Enjoy your sunshine too.

Bonnie said...

Enjoy the sun! The agapanthus was a lovely and thoughtful gift. It will be fun watching it grow and flourish!

Heather said...

It was warmer outside today that it was indoors. So lovely. I hope your agapanthus thrives. Such a beautiful plant which I managed to grow, though mine was a bit straggly and not in the best position.

Tasker Dunham said...

My legs are still as good as ever.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes I believe so Rachel but not as much as was first promised.
Fingers crossed over the agapanthus.
Tasker - I need photographic proof

sparklingmerlot said...

I had a giggle at your agapanthus - many people in Melbourne consider them weeds. I love them mainly because they are so hardy. A friend gave me some to plant as a border in my front garden and I just dumped them in the side bed where they have now happily taken root. It will be a challenge to dig them up again but it is on my to do list this winter. I love their purple flowers and they bloom at the same time as jacarandas do so if one is lucky to have both the world is a beautiful mauve for several weeks.

Anonymous said...

Yes, agapanthus certainly abound in South Australia- the town of Victor Harbour on the south coast is fondly ribbed as being 'the agapantha capital of the world.' The myriad of flowers vary from pure white to the softest lilac and dark deep blue/purples. We are now in winter, and a cold one too. I visited the hand spinners and weavers guild here to purchase accessories to keep warm. The headband I purchased was spun from English Leicester wool - that breed being one of the first to be imported to Australia and considered a heritage sheep. There is an English Leicester Association of Australia and the wool dyes beautifully. Pam.

Tom Stephenson said...

There is to be massive cuts in all the things that are most important to a healthy society. As usual it will be the people with the quietest voices who will be the easiest targets in the first wave. I know you do not want to turn your lovely blog towards 'politics', but you were a teacher, and a much-loved one at that I am guessing Weave. This lot lie as standard.

Joanne Noragon said...

I remember when I decided to wear shorts. I looked at all the fifty-something legs walking by in shorts and decided I would not be ashamed.

Susan said...

Regarding children falling behind in school, in Massachusetts (US), parents are given the option of having children repeat the grade lost. Additionally, if a student is 2 or more grade levels behind their equivalent age level, the Department of Education (DOE) feels the educational program is not meeting the student's needs. The problem with this is the parents must identify this issue and escalate it to the DOE and sadly they do not. It is unfortunate that school systems do not proactively address this issue.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Which is why the kilt never caught on in Yorkshire.
I fear you are right about the effects of home schooling (or rather the lack of it) on children from poorer families, despite all the fine words spoken by government ministers.

Sue said...

John’s comment about Yorkshire men and kilts made me laugh out aloud.

Cro Magnon said...

I shall be wearing shorts until the end of September. So many children these days are glued to their X Boxes, iPads, or phones. Parents need to be firmer.

Librarian said...

With warmer temperatures and sunshine here, too, you would think we're at a tropical island beach resort looking at how people walk around town, showing much more than you really want to see of them. I like less fabric on me in the summer as much as everybone but I try to look decent.

It's been going up and down through our media almost from the start of the pandemic, a big concern how many children can not be reached when schools are closed. A large part of the population here in the heavily industrialised region around Stuttgart does not speak German at home, and the parents are unable to help with school tasks. Also, many live in cramped housing where the children have no space and quiet time to do their homework.

Rachel Phillips said...

The teachers trade unions have been obstructive at every step of the way during Covid and with the tutoring plan they continue the same. There are many great teachers out there who have gone the extra mile but there is also an element led by the unions who are out to thwart anything the government says for no other reason than politics.

the veg artist said...

Cro, in saying that parents need to be firmer, I think you are overlooking the sheer inadequacy of some parents. It's not just about money in the home. My husband is a school governor, and there are children who will have had next to no tuition over the last year, in spite of the on-line efforts of their teachers. For some children, school had been their only hope of normalcy - Covid has robbed them of an entire year.

CharlotteP said...

Your agapanthus is certainly getting the best start in life, unlike lots of children who over the past year have missed out on education.The veg artist makes a valid point; some parents were incapable of home educating their children, lacking education themselves; other simply couldn't care less; and then there are those who had one parent working full time from home, who was also charged with 'educating', say 3 children of different ages - as a teacher, you will know that it simply isn't possible, however good your intentions.
Cro is also right...too many parents abdicate their responsibilities by allowing their children to be welded to their i-pads; but that's a slightly different issue.

Debby said...

Here, the big problem is that not everyone has access to the internet. When both parents work to make ends meet, there is not a lot of money left over to pay the monthly internet fees. That's how I ended up having William for school here.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Pam - interesting about the Leicester sheep - there are a few flocks round here - it is not a pretty sheep. Most of our sheep are Swaledales.

Thanks to you all for your coments about home schooling - a major problem and it won't go away but I just don't wish to get embroiled in it.