Saturday, 8 December 2018

Troubled times.

The News is now full of the riots in Paris, and to a lesser extent in other French cities I believe.  What is it that makes the French so much more 'passionate' about their politics than we are?   We might spend a lot of time moaning about issues like Brexit (who coined that word and hasn't it become irritating?) and an additional tax on fuel or some such issue.   But we do little or nothing about it other than moan.   We settle into some sort of complacency which spreads around and damps everything down.

Please don't think I wish it to be otherwise.   What is happening in France is terrible - people are suffering - often innocent people.   I believe the tax which sparked the riot in the first place has now been withdrawn, but now that things have started it seems difficult for it to stop.

Add to this the awful, dismal, damp weather, the long nights, the short, often dark days (my father always called the next two or three weeks 'the dark days before Christmas) and really nothing seems to be right anywhere in the world.   I expect it will pass, as everything does, but at what cost - mentally, physically and in terms of the cost, which will I expect run into millions.

'.
.I looked at Tess a short time ago.   Had her tea, had her 'wee and poo' walk, nestled in her basket by the radiator, settling down for yet another sleep and not a care in the world - and I couldn't help thinking ' would that it were like that for us all' -
dangerous thinking I suppose.

Still, tomorrow is another day and sun is forecast even if it is accompanied by gales and turning much colder.   At least my patio will dry - it has been wet and covered in wet leaves for the past month.

26 comments:

EM Griffith said...

It seems there's too much anger and rage everywhere in the world these days. People outraged about whatever the latest issue is. It's become too commonplace, and considering other times in history, like both World Wars of the last century, there's little we have (truly) to complain about. Perhaps society has become spoiled? Bored? Anyway, I've found it best for my sanity to limit exposure to the "news" of the day. There's always much to be done to plan for the holidays. Life is short. I hope to enjoy it as much as possible and hope you do, too. We could learn much from the furry companions in our lives!

John Going Gently said...

Perhaps we should get the world leaders to form a choir

Bea said...

Yes, I do believe the fuel tax, on diesel fuel no less, has been abandoned. They are into their 4th week of protests, so I imagine fuel isn't entirely the issue.

the veg artist said...

You're not the only one. I often fancy my cat's life!

Rachel Phillips said...

We see-saw along at the ballot box. It achieves the same thing without violence.

Heather said...

I can imagine how relaxed Tess looks in her basket - it is obviously a dog's life! As for everything else, we seem to be pawns in a game with very little power to change things for the better. I just get on with my life and hope for the best.

justjill said...

I like Johns suggestion about the choir. But we arent all not doing stuff. I am active as much as I can be in trying to get some sense out of all this Brexit rubbish. Lets see what happens next week. Just hoping it will be more positive. The Brits have always perfected revolutions in the distant past. And in a more peaceful manner may yet achieve what we are happier with..

Simon Douglas Thompson said...

I got utterly soaked today on my bicycle!

Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe said...

There seems to be turmoil everywhere and I have to ask the questions who and why. It could not all be a coincidence.

Cro Magnon said...

It's not only the petrol tax here; taxes on just about everything are set to leap. I hate rioting and destruction, but at the same time understand that those on small incomes will suffer. Whether or not their actions will do any good; I don't know.

Derek Faulkner said...

While few of us would want to witness a lot of the actions of the yellow shirts happening in this country, I bet a lot of us do have a degree of admiration for the way that the French people in the street do actually get things done, rather than simply rolling over and accepting whatever is put apon us as we do.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Undoubtedly there are millions across France too who are equally bewildered by the actions of their compatriots. As for the protestors, they'd better get used to paying more for their fuel because, quite apart from the environmental price that we're all paying, the amount of oil in the ground must be limited and the cost of extracting it must increase as we exploit more difficult to access deposits. Tess has a good point - might as well make yourself comfortable and enjoy some sweet dreams. I worry more about you slipping on those wet leaves so take care.

Dave said...

I've read that the initial protests and demonstrations had the support of many French people and they achieved their objective, but then the "cause" was taken over by other elements who have different motives from the fuel tax.

Gwil W said...

'The words of the prophets are written on the subway walls' (Simon & Garfunkel _ Sound of Silence)

The great unwashed have always been with us and will always jump on any bandwagon that's rolling. You can find people with an agenda at various demonstrations paying them in folding money to do so. That is one thing. The other thing is that the people will rise up when they feel they are being betrayed by their politicians or they are not being listened to or when taxes are too high. This is nothing new. What is new is the means of communication between like minded persons - the mobile phone which is in effect a mobile computer with internet.

'The times they are a changing' (Bob Dylan)

Derek Faulkner said...

Dylan also sang a song "Tomorrow is a long time", something a lot of people might be thinking Monday night before Tuesday's vote.

Tom Stephenson said...

The trouble with any peaceful demonstrations these days is that they always get taken over by violent anarchists. They ruin it for everyone.

Joanne Noragon said...

Unrest everywhere. We wait for ours to erupt; France's already has, and yours may be to the boil very soon.

Librarian said...

Using their democratic right to protest is a good and legitimate way to influence politics directly. BUT there is no excuse, none at all, for wreaking havoc upon cars, businesses and private homes of people who are definitely not responsible for anything the protesters are demonstrating against. That is just plain violence (and often greed for the things they think it should be their "right" to have).

Susan said...

Was there ever a time when life was not contentious? As long as one group has power over another we will have periods of unrest when oppression becomes too great or another faction wants the benefits of power.

Tracy said...

I respect anyone's right to protest against unfairness and injustice, however watching protesters wreck a car on the news last night made me angry. It was an ordinary red runabout, not a rich man's toy. Not only will that person have lost their car, but they will now have to deal with all the red-tape resulting from that, find a new way to get to wherever they wish to go, perhaps lose their job as a result of a lack of transport, which could (in theory)lead to such financial hardship that they lose their home. Where is the fairness and justice there?

Granny Sue said...

Here too, anger and dissatisfaction everywhere. What bothers me most is the name-calling and finger-pointing, as if we were all still in primary school. That, and the lack of civility and general crudenss we see so often, and it just gets passed over as if it's normal. It's not normal, nor is the scramble for power at any cost (as in Wisconsin right now) and the continual twisting of facts. I am very tired of it all. But today some of my grandchildren came over for a good country breakfast, and I saw ice flowers for the very first time. Now I am writing out my Christmas cards and listening to carols by the fire. There is still normalcy and civility in this tiny corner of the world, at least.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks everyone for these wise and thoughtful answers - would that the protesters thought along these lines.

thelma said...

In agreement with Tom Stephenson, whenever there is protest, the right wing anarchists will be there stirring up trouble and violence, here and everywhere else.

Rachel Phillips said...

Violent anarchists can be right or left and both and usually are.

Gwil W said...

Yesterday went to the Volksoper to see Leonard Berntein's 'Wonderful Town'. Part of a 100 year tribute. He was born in 1918. Great evening. Great atmosphere! Great performers. It was altogether wonderful. And after the long and deserved applause and standing ovation sit was smiles all round!

Sandi said...


It seems all of Europe is in turmoil.