Saturday, 5 January 2013

A Walk Down the Lane.

It is a long time since Tess and I walked down the Lane to Forty-Acre Wood.   It is a mile each way and two miles is going it a bit for me these days.   But yesterday I had a slight attack of the condition which stopped me driving for sixth months.   I went immediately to the doctor and am to see the neurologist in about ten days but it is pretty depressing news.   I thought the walk might help me to sort things out in my mind, and of course it has done so.   Many people of my age have such awful illnesses to contend with, I should be grateful that it is something so slight, albeit a nuisance.

Returning from the two mile walk I was just about all in - as was Tess i think.   But what a lovely walk it was, and a ten minute sit down has restored me to normal, whatever that is.

I started in the front garden and was amazed to find things still out.
Primroses, a rose (Dark Lady) and a Christmas Rose (helleborus niger), and the daffodils (tete-a-tete) were poking through the gravel - can't be bad.

One side of the Lane, Forty acre wood has all but disappeared.   I do hope that in the Spring they might plant it up again because it looks so sad and deserted,   The other side is as it has always been with a ride down to the pheasant huts.

Water is standing everywhere and the reflections in the pools are absolutely lovely.   The gateways to every field have deep ruts filled with water.   The sheep stand and watch us as we pass.

The beck is still very full and where there are wire fences across the debris caught in the fence shows just how high the water has been in our recent floods.   We have now had several days without rain and some of the puddles have begun to drain, but the farmer says we need several months of dry weather for the land to become workable again.

On both sides of the Lane there were shooting parties at work, and Tess put up several cock pheasants hiding in the hedge.   I do hope they escaped the carnage - they are far too beautiful to appear, featherless on the dining table in my view.

The temperature here today is eleven degrees Celsius, quite mild for January; the sky is fairly clear and there are glimpses of the sun now and then.   We have to soak up every fine day whilst we get it, so that if/when 'real' Winter arrives we have something in reserve.






Enjoy the weekend.     

25 comments:

Heather said...

Beautiful photos as usual Pat. Glad you enjoyed your walk with Tess and that your condition is only a nuisance and nothing more serious. Look after yourself. I have noticed signs of approaching spring in our garden but know that winter hasn't even started yet.

E Wix said...

Dear Weaver,
One of your brilliant essays bringing a winter walk to life.
How wretched not to be fully well. Do hope the neurologist will be helpful. I bet Tess had a super walk and thank God no more rain. Few helebores round here.
All best wishes for a speedy recovery.

Gerry Snape said...

It's good to see the pics back again Pat and more of the countryside locally.!

Arija said...

What delightful photos of the unwelcome amounts of water around you. I do hope you were wearing your Wellies. We all have glitches on our merry way to eternity. I too am in a like situation., but, as you say, there are so many people so much worse off. that we can count ourselves lucky to have such little troubles.
I wish you better health and fair weather.

Arija said...

Back again. Re computers, I have had windows 7 for years and still use it for our complex farm tax but only because the Prof set up spread sheets for it.
My daughter got me a delightful Apple laptop and although this dog has seniority over you, I picked up the new system very quickly. The apple is so easy to use! You can scroll in all directions by just drawing 2 fingers on the mouse pad. By drawing them apart you immediately enlarge the page. You can open as many pages as you want at the same time.
I find it really fun to use. Just think about it and try one out before you commit to windows

Grizz………… said...

Weaver…

Time is relentless…always extracting its price. And when we're ill, or an old condition rears up again, it's often a struggle to keep from getting depressed. It's so easy to see the future only in terms of our limitations. I hope your neurologist can help; but even more, I hope the strength and positive outlook I've always noted in you overcomes any news. I'm sure that two-mile walk helped considerably toward regaining your indomitable perspective.

Dartford Warbler said...

So pleased that you and Tess were able to walk without rain, and that you felt well enough to enjoy the woods.

acornmoon said...

I would like to wish you and the farmer and Tess a very happy new year and long may you take us with you on your rambles. x

mrsnesbitt said...

Sorry to read the news Pat. I sincerely hope the neurologist puts your mind at rest. Dxxxx

angryparsnip said...

Oh Weaver
I am sorry to hear your not feeling well. But I am so happy you took a winter walk and we walked along with Tess.
Recover soon !

cheers, parsnip

Angie said...

I just love your blog---I'm so glad you're there and sharing your daily life with us. :)

MorningAJ said...

I really hope that whatever it is you have is temporary. Get well really soon, OK?

Loren said...

It's always a good day when you can see flowers as pretty as that.

Hopefully you'll be feeling better later.

Penny said...

At least you could still walk and that is always a help when things go wrong. Lovely photos as usual. Hope the news is good.

Pondside said...

What a change from not much more than a week ago. You are far ahead of us.
Take good care of yourself!

Hildred and Charles said...

How lovely to see your blossoms, Pat. My Lenten Rose is covered with two feet of snow, but hopefully by the time Lent arrives it will be in bud. Take care, - do hope your little spell is a temporary thing.

Dave King said...

Sorry to hear about the recurrence of your condition. I do sincerely hope it's but a hiccup. Thanks for such a lovely description of what must have been an invigorating walk, even if initially exhausting! It's a wonderful account and took me right along with you both.

George said...

Sorry to hear about the ongoing physical challenges, PAT, but, it time, they come in differing degrees to all of us. Let the rest of us just hope that we can find the same indomitable spirit that takes you back at every opportunity to the healing sound, smells, and sights of nature.

Rachel Fox said...

Yes, lovely poetic descriptions. A tweak here and there to that piece and you have poem of the month, Pat!

x

Golden West said...

Hoping you'll be feeling better soon, Weaver. I must agree with Arija - getting an Apple computer several years back was a revelation - very easy and a joy to use and makes my old pc seem like dinosaur technology in comparison.

Thinking of you and hoping for all best outcomes.

jill said...

Sorry to hear you are not well Pat Im sure that when you visit the neurologist he will give you good news I will be thinking about you.You walk sounds like it did you good and your photos are lovely.Love Jill xx

The Solitary Walker said...

Hope the visit to the neurologist is helpful, Pat. Our thoughts are with you. x Robert & Carmen

The Weaver of Grass said...

That is the brilliant thing about blogging isn't it? If your spirits need boosting then blog and hey presto you get good wishes from around the world. Thank you so much fora) going on my walk with me and b)giving my spirits the lift they needed.
Incidentally - I feel fine - no different from how I felt yesterday.

Cloudia said...

let us walk on together as long as we may!

ArtPropelled said...

Hi Pat, I'm so sorry you've had a bad turn, but relieved that a walk cheered you up. Being able to walk in the countryside admiring the miracle of nature goes a long way to making one feel connected to something bigger and amazing, which invariably makes one feel a little better about one's worries. I hope the neurologist is able to reassure you. I will be thinking positive thoughts in the mean time.