Sunday, 28 November 2021

What to write about today

 Well, going out for a walk is certainly not an option today.   It was quite pleasant  when I got up (just after six as it is my carer's week end off and my reserve carer comes just  after seven to fit in with her other commitments.)

But by the time I had washed and dressed, breakfasted and cleaned my teeth it became obvious once the blinds were drawn back that the roads were icy and there had been a fall of snow overnight.   And within the next hour or so it snowed again - all morning.   Now there has been about an inch of the pretty but horribly inconvenient stuff, the clouds are clearing away, the sun is coming out and the sky is clear blue. 

I am wearing my new, delightful and beautifully knitted socks from Jenny (My Life in Flip Flops on my side bar) so at least I am warm.   And apparently we can say good-bye to this weather today for a day or two or though it does not promise to be much warmer.

I find my thought today drifting back time and again to the refugees in those dreadful camps by Dunkirk.   Whatever one's view on the refugee crisis, nobody would wish to see those young men women and children out under canvas in weather like this - thank goodness for the volunteers who seem to be supplying them with warming food.   What kind of life the children will have after a start like this I just can't imagine.   Nor can I imagine what it must be like to be so afraid in one's country that fleeing thousands of miles across often hostile country in search of a better life is preferable to staying put. 

We look at - and complain about - so much here.   We need I think to stop and think as the winter draws in that we have much to be grateful for.

Wrap up well dear friends - see you tomorrow.

15 comments:

Derek Faulkner said...

Fortunately, we in North Kent didn't suffer your weather. We had a windy and very cold night and today has been unbroken sunshine, dry and just breezy with a temperature of around 3 degrees. Walking round the nature reserve early today in a wind chill of minus 3 was bracing but I was glad to be able to still be there.
Sat in the conservatory this afternoon in a warming sun, drinking some red wine and reading "Wind in the Willows" for the umpteenth time.

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

Have a cozy day. Much snow here today in Ontario. -Jenn

Justme said...

Young children, women and genuine refugees are one thing but organised gangs of young men with mobile phones terrorising the good people of calais are another. Such a group of men tried to force their way into my campervan yesterday whilst I was trying to get petrol. A local French couple helped me and said their lives were a misery and told me that you have to be on your guard constantly. No wonder the French are letting the problem pass over to us. I think genuine deserving refugees are suffering as a result of these gangs of economic migrants.

Derek Faulkner said...

Nice to see the other side of the problem Justme, it balances things up.

Tasker Dunham said...

Snowed quite heavily again this afternoon, but it wasn't as cold as yesterday, so out we went up the field in the blizzard. With fresh snow all around it meant it was safer underfoot.

Rachel Phillips said...

My nephew has had everything chucked at him at Melsonby. It was clearly quite a storm.

Heather said...

I have profound sympathy for refugees risking all in their quest for a better life, but how do you separate them from those just looking for an easy ticket? We can't possibly accommodate them all and I do think that other European countries could take their share.
I am always thankful for the life I am blessed with - even our climate, which although uncomfortable at times, is not usually life threatening.
Stay safe and cosy.

Librarian said...

Yes, most of us have a lot more reason for gratitude than for complaints. I am very much aware of that and try not to lose sight of all the good and beautiful aspects of my life when I am getting fed up with things at work or other stuff.
No snow here just yet, but we did see a light white dusting on top of the Black Forest hills rising behind O.K.‘s village yesterday on a quick walk around the village.

Melinda from Ontario said...

It's snowing here in Ontario and I'm feeling super cozy. I even played Christmas music earlier.
I feel terribly sorry for many of the refugees, (particularly those with children.) Although Canada takes in refugees, refugees don't normally land on our shores, (although it has happened.) When I was in University, (30+ years ago), my mother excitedly called me from our home in Nova Scotia. 170 Sikhs refugees had just landed on the shores of a fishing village in Shelburne County. They were from Northern India and were escaping the slaughter of Sikhs after Indira Ghandi was assonated. They had been on the open seas for 17 days and were hungry and thirsty. They had no idea where they were and were wandering up the highway looking for Toronto, (1700 KM away). Local people poured out of their houses to help them. They hustled them into the local community center, gave them warm blankets and "fed them up". All of these refugees became Canadian citizens and by all accounts have done very well.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Derek - my choice of reading material for a day like this exactly.

the veg artist said...

Apart from a violent hail shower, the problem in West Wales has been the wind. I don't ever remember such constant howling. We are used to strong westerlies here, but this wind was from the north, and quite different, and very, very cold. Glad it's over, and we are set for much milder weather in a day or so.

Chris said...

There is no right answer to the refugee problem, be they economic refugees or fleeing war and other problems. In my view, new immigrants are generally a benefit to any country willing to take them in. The effort required to start over in a new country where they may not speak the language speaks to their determination to be good, contributing citizens. The people I have no sympathy for are the smugglers who extort ridiculous sums from these usually poor, destitute people on the run!

Susan said...

You are right. We have much to be grateful for. Our problems are minor in comparison to the refugees you speak of. The cold weather has definitely settled in. We've only had a dusting of snow so far. There will no doubt be more snow. That said, we are prepared with snow plowing and sanding for our roads. Most have 4-wheel drive vehicles and this makes driving okay. Warm coats, hats, gloves and boots are the order of the day.

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Crafty Green Poet said...

We do have much to be grateful for, you're definitely right.

Refugees have a terrible time of it