Thursday, 4 November 2021

Exhausted.

 What people don't realise is that walking with a Rollator is very tiring.   Luckily Priscilla can't read so she can't see that that is what I think of her.   But it is almost half past three in the afternoon and it wasn't until half an hour ago when friends T and S called that I had had a minutes peace other then five minutes to eat my lunch and that was interrupted by a phone call.

Let me tell you about my morning.  My carer came at half past seven to half past eight.   When she had gone I had to smarten myself up, tidy away various things, take my walker through to the bedroom in order to get my anorak out of the wardrobe, lock the front door, open the garage door, negotiate Priscilla on to the front of the garage, close the garage door, negotiate the steep front drive to the side of the road - and arrive just in time for the arrival of my taxi.

A short drive brought me to the Hairdresser where I had to wait for the driver to bring Priscilla out of the boot, open her up and bring her round and help me to get my hands on her handlebars and then open the door to help me into the salon.   Then it is take off my anorak while holding on with one hand as I am too wobbly to stand unaided, hang up my anorak, negotiate Priscilla to the washbasin, take out hearing aids and take off specs and put them on the shelf and then steer Priscilla over to the chair for my shampoo and afterwards back to the chair ready for the neatening up process.

Then I left the hairdresser, walked a hundred yards down the road, crossed on the crossing, walked back on the other side and into the Newsagents to buy stamps, birthday cards, pay last month's paper bill, then sit and wait for the taxi to arrive (I had forgotten my mobile but the assistant kindly phoned my taxi to tell them I was ready.)

Once home the builder had arrived to work on my drain - he has made a super, tidy job of it - it looks lovely.  I made him a cup of tea and then had my lunch (my carer had put it in the micro wave ready for me to switch on).  During lunch I arranged with my son on the phone for the builder to go round there when he had finished and look at a little job my son wanted doing. (that had a satisfactory ending).

Then the mail came and I opened it, disposed of some, filed some, checked my bank statement, filed it away, washing up the lunch pots (I no longer use the dishwasher unless  I have visitors - wastes too much water and electricity) drying them and putting them away.   Then it is - thank the builder (who is off to look at my son's job)-sit down to write my blog, answer the door bell, it is friends T and S - thank goodness - T and I between us make a coffee and for an hour we sit and chat in the sitting room.

Bear in mind all this has been done using Priscilla or her cousin who is quite like her but slightly lighter weight. Negotiating corners, missing furniture, generally 'driving' what is quite a cumbersome machine.

Now four o'clock and no walk today in spite of a very pleasant day.   There has been no time.   Every step, which once seemed so easy, is an effort.   But it keeps me mobile and upright and keeps me meeting and chatting to folk - and I wouldn't have it any other way.   But until it happens to us we don't realise just how muc effort is involved.   

Not a moan dear blog friends just an observation.   In the days when I was mobile the whole lot above would take an hour - now it takes a day.


32 comments:

Marcia LaRue said...

You got a lot done including some walk time without going around your usual route! It was just done in increments so probably doesn't seem as much ... You are due for a good sit down and rest!

Barbara Anne said...

Hi Pat, your comment about Pricilla's bulk and weight make me wonder if Priscilla is the correct size for you? She may be larger than you need. It wasn't until my mother needed a Rollator that I became aware they are made in different sizes as well as in an array of colors. When my FIL needed a walker, he was too tall and wide to use the one that my petite mother had used, so the one ordered for him was much wider and a bit taller. If you'd do as well with a smaller version, it would weigh a bit less. As a retired Registered Nurse, I'm always trying to help. :-)

Hugs!

Rachel Phillips said...

My mother always took her hearing aids out before going to the hairdresser, or rather never put them in that morning. One less thing to worry about at the hairdressers. She slept most of the rest of that day. You do remarkably well.

Derek Faulkner said...

My ex-mother in law, who is 89 and can barely walk across a room, has her hairdresser come to the house once a month, surely that would remove one arduous journey into town.

Joan (Devon) said...

Although the walkers and Zimmer frames are necessary they are hard work to move around and makes my shoulders ache at the end of the day. Unfortunately there is no alternative when you have balance/walking issues.

I have a local mobile hairdresser who comes every month or so.

Rachel Phillips said...

My mother eventually swapped to a hairdresser who came to the house.

Tasker Dunham said...

I'd be interested to know Priscilla's cousin's name.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

It sounds as though you got plenty of exercise and walking, despite not getting out on your usual route march. When I worked with children with disabilities I was seconded for a while to the physio department. One day when there wasn't much else to do I tried out some of the spare Rollators and other aids we had, so I know exactly what you mean about the difficulties of using them - even for someone who doesn't need one.

The Feminine Energy said...

Yep!! I'm glad you made mention of this, friend. People who are "abled" just have no idea what it's like to be "dis-abled". My other found the rollers on her walker too "slippery" so she used a walker without one.... which meant she had to pick-up the dang thing with every step she took. The poor palms of both hands had callouses on them after doing that for nearly 10 years. It's good that someone says something, like you have today. Let us all be aware of the heavy crosses that others must bear!! God bless you~ Andrea xoxoxo

The Feminine Energy said...

Not "other"... it's "mother". My mother found the rollers on her walker too slippery....

Anonymous said...

Again Pat- admirable how you keep on keeping on - an inspiration. I have been quite ill of late, not leaving the house, and although husband is around, it has given me a new admiration for the house-bound. I must say though, that if I relax into the circumstances,
so much pressure is off.-Pam.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Pam - you have hit ther nail on the head saying if you relax into the circumstances the pressure is off. It is but I see that as giving in to my age and keep pushing myself.
Andrea we are all different with our disabilities - I have several friends my age who can't use walkers either.
John - yes they can be cumbersome and awkward - I think often you just need to persevere. But when one just can't walk without one then there are only two alternatives - persevere or stay indoors.
Tasker - she hasn't got one - she is the poor relation. Like to suggest one?
To those of you who speak of mobile hairdressers - the taxi stopsRachel - have thought of it but I love the way my hairdresser does my hair.
To those of you who sugest mobile hairdressers - my taxi stops at the door and the driver opens the salon door for me and I sit on Priscilla so not all the ardudous. And I get a change of scene and meet another group of people.
Barbara Anne - thank you for the advice. I was examined carefully and measured before this one was ordered and I am very comfortable with it. I think there is always going to be a bit of a problem with my mobility but I do feel very safe with it.
Thank you all for your advice.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Sorry but on my read through I see I have printed one phrase twice and made a couple of errore. I do apologise but you get the general idea I'm sure.

Rachel Phillips said...

Why yes of course I understand that. You are not ready to give up the hairdressers yet.

Debby said...

You might want to get yourself a pedometer, especially now that winter is coming on. You can keep track of your steps around the house. They do add up, Weaver.

Ellen D. said...

You are right to keep doing as much as you can even if it does wear you out some days. You are doing a good job of managing and have adjusted your life when needed (like giving up your car). I do think you are showing us all how to keep active in later life. Well done!

Heather said...

I have come to the conclusion that we are permitted to feel tired, and surely all your efforts doing what you did during the day would count as exercise and your walk took place in town.
I think your rollator must be more sturdy than my three wheeled 'trolley' which was initially bought to save me dragging a normal shopping trolley with one hand and using a walking stick in the other. I find it quite supportive and it makes walking much easier for me as I am inclined to lose my steering without it! I can lift it up and down kerbs if it is empty, but with your mobility problems I am sure you need something more solidly made.
Hope tomorrow will be less hectic for you.

Susan said...

I suspect tomorrow will be less busy. Wouldn't you think medical science could solve some of the later in life mobility issues. Legs seem to be the weak link in aging. My grandmother and uncle both ultimately dealt with mobility issues. Yet the both lived to 100. From what I see, you do remarkably well and you do what you intend to do and that is impressive.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Heather I was told a few years ago by my Physio never to trust a three wheeled trolley as they are not stable enough.

wherethejourneytakesme2 said...

Well done persevering - it must be such hard work for you. As you say it gets you out and about still so worthwhile keeping going.

AK Coldweather said...

Name for Priscilla's poor relation... perhaps "Cinders"?
I do admire your grit. -A.K.

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Hilde said...

I think you are doing very well, your day was so full ti would have left me exhausted, too. And I am only in my late sixties. But I have noticed for some time now that even small things take me much langer than they used to.
Some years ago I helped a friend looking for routes accessible with a walker because her mother had to use one. I remember quite well how difficult and tiring it was.
Hilde in Germany

The Weaver of Grass said...

Cinders - possibility - certainly brings up the right image but perhaps a bit unkind to her image'

thelma said...

A day in the life of.... what a busy day Pat and yet you have so much fortitude and strength to face down the challenges of the day we can only envy you.

Librarian said...

You do admirably well, Pat, and are a shining example for everyone who thinks of simply giving up because it seems like the easiest way, requiring the least effort.
Like you have explained, I think it is good for you still going to the hairdresser's in town; it gives you a regular outing. Plus you did walk in town, didn't you, so you weren't entirely without a walk that day.
My Dad sadly refuses to even TRY walking with a rollator. He is too stubborn but if you see just how long it takes him from the settee to the toilet, you want to shout sense into him - of course it doesn't work, but I wish he had just a fraction of your determination to keep going! (And he is 10 years younger than you are.)

Tom Stephenson said...

Don't push yourself too hard, Weave. I am late to this post so I expect you are now rested up.

susie @ persimmon moon cottage said...

I have been seeing advertising for rollators that have taller bars for pushing, so one doesn't have to walk bent over. It looks like it would be nice because one is more heads up and walking in normal posture. I don't know how much it weighs or how difficult it would be to fit into the car trunk to travel. It looks like it would solve the aching shoulders problem.

Tara said...

My mother used a collator, then a wheelchair and transport chair (for indoor things). It really does take forever to get anything done. The entire morning was taken up with breakfast, bathing and dressing. Getting out for early morning appointments was impossible. But, as you say, it kept h3r in the world. It was a real ware up call for me, in my sixties, to move about while I can. This isn't what we signed up for, is it?

The Weaver of Grass said...

Susie my neighbour brought me in an article on these earlier in the week - I intend to look into them.

You lot help to keep me going - I can't let you down can I?


Thanks for the encouragement

vic said...

I think that the most important thing is just to keep moving in general. Heather's comment above was right on. All the effort, inning and outing and navigating with Pricilla involved in your trip to the hairdressers and around the house certainly should count and make up for a good bit of the walk that you missed out on. I do applaud your "can do" attitude and appreciate all the effort that it takes for you to accomplish the things that you do.

Take care.

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