Saturday, 7 February 2015

Signs of Spring

One of the downsides of living in a village is that you learn about everyone and know everyone to some degree.   I lived in a Midlands town for almost twenty years and apart from my next door neighbour and the old man across the street I knew no-one to speak to.   I worked full time and went out in the car in the morning and came back in the evening and that was it.

Here, in a small village, particularly one with a monthly coffee morning which is very well attended, I know almost everyone.   Thus it was this morning that I heard two pieces of sad news - one that a figure well known in the area (and far too young) had died yesterday and the other that a friend had cancer.

So today I am posting a 'cheering up' post.   It is a lovely sunny day - quite different from last Saturday when there was a strong cold breeze and there was snow lying on the ground.   Our front garden is walled and faces due South, so before my after-dinner walk I went into the garden with my camera and was heartened to see just how much was growing.   There were snowdrops, aconites, soldiers and sailors, one tiny rosebud, a hellebore argutifolius and the big fat buds of the Lenten Rose.   Then on my walk I took a photograph of a half-grown rabbit sunning himself in the hedgeback.







I have no doubt that there will be more Winter to come - we don't get off that lightly - but just for now let's all enjoy the signs and think about our blessings.   Have a good weekend.

16 comments:

Mac n' Janet said...

Cold at night here, but warming up into the 60's during the day.
We've lived here going on 12 years and though we're on nodding aquaintance with most of our neighbors I'd say we're friendly with only one of them. My daffodils are blooming their heads off and my hyacinths are joining them.

Heather said...

Hopefully the families with that sad news will have kind neighbours to give help if it's needed.
I love your new header and all the other signs of approaching spring in your garden. I think you are ahead of us. It is cold and grey here today but buds are fattening all around and the birds are singing.

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello,

The close community if a small village can be rather like a curate's egg........ good in parts.

There is the support that can be given from neighbours and friends, but there is also the lack of privacy When everyone knows everyone else's business.

However, with these pieces of sad news, it is good to take stock of one's own blessings and give thanks for them. It is easy to forget.

angryparsnip said...

What a very smart house builder to situate your home with a south facing garden.
My home windows are north and south facing. That way the hot summer sun travels east to west over the roof and the windows are protected.
Your garden flowers are lovely. Some I have not heard of. Off to look them up.

cheers, parsnip

Joanne Noragon said...

It seems a pleasant garden to come into, in spite of the sad news at your gathering.

Devon said...

It is such a treat to wander the garden in spring... it is a very hopeful time, bursting with possibilities!
So sorry to hear of your sad village news. I grew up in a town very similar, the good thing about it was the feeling of connection and support when needed.

Terry and Linda said...

WOW! Beautiful and most welcome!

Linda ❤⊱彡
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com
https://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com/sherlock-boomer

Twiggy said...

We moved from a city to a village 10 years ago, it has it's pros and cons. I love your photos paticularly the sunbathing rabbit
Twiggy

George said...

Yes, yes, Pat, celebrate what is new and forthcoming. The bad news will always be there. Everything is redeemed, however, by the coming of something new, sources of joy we might never have imagined.

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

So far not a lot of spring signs here - but the hyacinths are pushing through the soil - and if I looked around the area I'm sure I could find some crocus coming up - but it is raining so hard - over an inch every night and more in the day - that I tend to stay indoors and prefer dry to soaking wet from exploring. Soon this rain will begin to ease up and more days with some sunshine will appear - then I'll be on the hunt for flowers.

Gwil W said...

Your new header certainly cheered me up. No sign of any life in the garden here yet, apart from animal footprints in the snow.

MorningAJ said...

You have a rosebud already! Now THAT's spring!

Penny said...

Lovely new header. Here in South Oz we are back to full summer heat, after such a mild summer the garden has had a shock.

Bovey Belle said...

That's it isn't it - no sooner do you convince yourself that spring has arrived - or at the very least, is in the offing, and barger me, we get snow! Often happens in our neck of the woods in Wales, and is very annoying! Snow and tulips is not a good mix .. .

Bovey Belle said...

P.S. In our tiny community, everyone knows everyone, and everyone's business, though since Eira down the hill has died, the bush telegraph isn't half as good . . .

Cro Magnon said...

I spotted some miniature daffs almost in flower yesterday. Maybe they'll stay 'almost in flower' for some time to come.