Saturday, 26 September 2020

The 'in' crowd.

It struck me forcibly on Friday morning when The Times came, that I have never been in the 'in' crowd.   As a teenager I lived out in the wilds of Lincolnshire and played the organ at the Methodist Chapel in what was a very Methodist village (I am speaking of during and just after the Second World War).  I had a large group of friends and we had village 'hops' organised by the vicar - we all danced to a three piece band made up of three slightly older chaps.   My friend and I were 'band followers' and went on Saturday nights one week to Lincoln to dance in the Co-op Hall and the next week we would go to a village called Wasp's Nest (I promise you that is its true name) in the wilds of Lincolnshire.   Here , with the local youth, we always felt we were really sophisticated compared with them!   But of course sophisticated is an easily misinterpreted word.

When I married my husband and I were both interested in classical music - we both played instruments - flute and piano respectively in the days before we got into Early Music.   So again 'pop' passed us by.   My son came along and by the time he was eight he was learning the Double Bass and it was obvious that he was destined for a life of music and he studied it (and got an A) at A level.   He read music  at University and when he was home he listened all the while to modern classical music.   When he was around sixteen he and I went together to the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London to see Stockhausen conduct the first performance of one of his pieces.   I know, because I asked him recently, that it was one of the highlights of his early life.

But then, when he left home, my husband and I got heavily involved in Early Music and together with friends formed an Early Music Group and went around the Midlands playing.   So now, in my eighties I watch programmes like Pointless and as well as knowing nothing at all about Football, which always features heavily, I also know nothing at all about pop music, who sang what, who had an album in which year - it is all gobbledegook to me.   And when, on Fridays in The Times Caitlin Moran does her top ten things about who is in the news, most of them concern somebody in the limelight for pop, modern culture, society and the like - I have never heard of any of them.   There is a whole section of society that has been left out of my life and it is a bit late now to do anything about it.--

18 comments:

Gerry Snape said...

...and what a bonus that is....most of it..though though no doubt entertaining for an hour or so....tends to be of the easily forgotten....I'm mainly in that catagory too...can't answer their questions!

Barbara Anne said...

Ah, it's never too late! Music is a delight and you can continue to enjoy the music from your youth or enjoy newer music.

When DH and I were young adults but not yet married, he was able to get tickets for us to hear Arthur Rubinstein play one of his last concerts as he was quite old at the time. It was an incredible concert and unforgettable.

Hugs!

Jennifer said...

I can't believe you used the word "gobbledegook" today! That word features prominently in the blog post I wrote this morning! What a weird coincidence. :)

Heather said...

I shouldn't worry about that - I don't recognise today's 'celebrities' or know who's song reached the Top Ten or what it was. I grew up with a love of classical piano music as an older cousin was studying the piano. I was not allowed to disturb her at practice, but loved to linger outside the door and listen to her playing. I even managed to get a ticket to hear Eileen Joyce give a lunchtime concert at the Festival Hall once. I am sure we, and many others, have managed very well without being one of the 'in' crowd.

Bonnie said...

It sounds like you had a very strong and good musical foundation. You can always try out other types of music any time you feel like it, but the main thing in my opinion is that you listen to what you enjoy. Sometimes someone will ask me what type of music I like and the only answer I can give them is most all types. I love a variety of music from classical to rock with a lot in between. Sometimes being in the "in crowd" actually takes away from the true person you are.

Virginia said...

Oh, I do understand! I'll bet you've never watched the Kardashians either Pat ... and you haven't missed a thing . Not that I would really know, as I haven't either! I discovered classical music in my late teens, and I've been to hundreds and hundreds of convert, but never to a pop concert, or anything modern, except Andrew Lloyd Webber's musicals. DO I regret it? No, but I do wonder occasionally whether my life would've been different if I had.

You always get me thinking. Thank you. I'll also bet you wouldn't be taking Percy out today if you were here - extreme gale force winds and driving rain. An inside day!

Joanne Noragon said...

And you missed nothing!

Granny Sue said...

I so understand. As a teen I knew all the pop songs. Then I left for the mountains in my early twenties, lived for 16 years without electricity so no TV, etc. By the time we "powered up" in 1990 I was into folk, old-time, ballads, and even classical music. I am way out of touch with celebrities, and don't really care at all.

Cro Magnon said...

Everyone is a star 'these' days. If they've appeared once in a 'reality TV programme', they're automatically a star. Anyone who's made a rap record is a star; even if it didn't sell. There are so many of them that it's impossible to keep up (thank goodness).

thelma said...

The thing about music is there are many forms, it is like being offered a tin of mixed sweets. I often play Radio 2 for its zingy music but could not quote one musician, but then Mozart, or even occasionally Taverner, let alone Kate Bush or Leonard Cohen - music is also a form of poetry.

the veg artist said...

Between work and house renovations there were about 20 years during which I hardly watched TV, and pop music had never been a thing at home, so, like you, I have huge gaps - but then, we know about other things!

The Weaver of Grass said...

What a great response from you all - thank you for joining in.Heather reminding me of Eileen Joyce - I had completely forgotten about her - wonderful stuff. I once went to the Q E Hall in London alone to see Andreas Schiff play Bach's Goldberg Variations - magical - to have learned and to play the complete thing with no music there and with such feeling for the music. Pure magic Thank you - I am not the only one to have missed out.
Agree also Thelma - music is indeed a form of poetry.
Jennifer - great minds think alike and all that!
Barbara Anne - Rubenstein - magic indeed -

Many many thanks. Have a good Sunday

Librarian said...

When we were little, our parents introduced us to many different styles of music, from Bach to Beatles, from Glenn Miller to Mozart, ABBA to Vivaldi and back. I still can enjoy a wide range of music but I have largely stopped following who has been doing what after my teenage years were over. Back then, I would have been able to tell you who made the sandwiches at the studio during the recording of a specific album. Nowadays, I couldn‘t care less about what passes for celebrities.

Tom Stephenson said...

'Im in with the in crowd...' what a mad song that was.

Salty Pumpkin Studio said...

Amazing post connecting many of us
When I read in the news folks going on and on about somebody, I wonder who made that somebody a celebrity. I might watch them perform on TV. It becomes obvious a public relation$ deal creates the nom de jour. They make their money and name, and then fade away until the next money making cycle is due. In some cases, the person is highly talented, and/or goes on to bigger well done things. In the majority of cases, their cyle goes by without my noticing. Until...one of them says something controversial to force attention back their way, (for a minute or two). It is what it is. Voices we hear or don't. Talent that is or isn't.

jinxxxygirl said...

Thank you for leaving the lovely comment on my blog Pat.. Exactly that is 'Early Music'? When left to my own devices i listen to music of the 70's and sometimes 80's... I had a daughter that loved pop so i like some of that too.. She is 30+ now and i haven't kept up with 'todays' music.. My husband loves country.. and i don't mind it but i by no means love it.. lol When i'm in the mood i like classical too.. and some new age like Enya and Yanni... and Enigma.. I like to think of my tastes as eclectic ...lol I think its fabulous that you play insturments.. and your family did too.. My daughter plays the trombone but my husband and i do not play at all.. and i wish we did.. Do you still practice any with your ukulele ?Do you miss it? Hugs! deb

A Smaller Life said...

I wouldn't worry to much about not knowing who some of the current batch of 'celebrities' are, many a time we sit down to watch a Celebrity Edition of something only to not know a single face, they could be anybody for all we know.

Some of the things that pass us by actually pass us by for a reason, we have better things to do and better people to learn about. But each to their own I guess.

thousandflower said...

My father trained as a concert pianist and taught piano lessons in our town. I grew up listening to Chopin being practised in the evenings, even before I was born. He took me to a Rubenstein concert when I was around 10 or so. So, I too have very little knowledge or frankly interest, in most popular music. My daughters all discovered popular music on their own.