Wednesday, 23 September 2020

Wednesday morning early.

As I am sure you know by now, I live opposite a Post Box.   It is jolly useful.   All I have to do is write the letter, stamp it, then Percy and I wend our way down the drive, across the road and along the footpath   the other side back to the postbox.  This morning I needed to do this   before the postman came to empty the box for the day.   Gone are the days when there were two or even three deliveries a day (remember them? If you do then you must be of pensionable age at least).   It is a nice feeling to get a job completed.

But it has been raining hard all night, everywhere was saturated and the long grass on the piece of spare ground hung over the path.   And - what a sight.   I wish I had taken my camera with me but no way were Percy and I doing this journey twice on a morning like this.   The footpath was literally covered with small snails with pretty fawn and white swirly shells, all making their way across the foot path from one patch of grass to another.   Such a beautiful display.

Then a paragraph in today's Times caught my eye over my morning coffee.   Luckily it doesn't happen too often but it is not a unique happening - two last year - and so far only one this year.   But a very popular man - only in his fifties - from Richmond (our Richmond, only a few miles from here) was killed at the start of this week while walking his dogs.   He was walking on a footpath but through a field of cows with calves. (it is that time of year) and he was killed by the cows.   What a tragic loss of life and really nobody to blame.  Leaving behind him a distraught family and a whole lot of young people in the school where he was Deputy Head - just enjoying his walk - innocent cows only doing what any mother would do - protect its child.   Sometimes life is cruel. 

16 comments:

Brenda said...

I especially love the British blogs-no whining about the situation at present...thank you.

Ruth said...

How often do you see a parade of snails! Life isn't dull by any means - it only needs being observant and being in the right place at the right time.

Your last paragraph is so sad. I'm sure that dear soul had been coping with the pandemic, fearful of contracting it, and then his end came in a totally unexpected and accidental way, nearly unheard of. It kind of puts things into perspective - our date is set, and no matter what we do, it'll happen when we least expect it. All the more reason to treasure every waking moment!

Thank you ever so much for posting every day - I look forward to it and appreciate your sharing in such a lovely and interesting way.

Midmarsh John said...

Am I right in thinking that there used to be, many decades ago, two post deliveries on weekdays?

Doc said...

What a tragic way to go.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Lots of snails here this morning and I'd trod on a couple before I even saw them. I said "Sorry" but I'm afraid that was too little too late. Our postman used to poke his head around the door and enquire "Any to go?", not only delivering letters but collecting them as well. We lived nearly a mile from the nearest postbox and much appreciated this extra service. So sad to hear about the teacher's untimely and unlucky death.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes John I am sure there were two post deliveries a day on weekdays - adnd lik John lower down says - the postman would always take any mail you wanted to post. I suppose that in these computerised days there just is no long that kind of mail. Time marches on whether we like it or not.
Yes Doc - a tragic way indeed but not all that rare an occurrence up here in The Dales.

Sue in Suffolk said...

Colin often had to walk through fields of cows to get to the footpath bridges that he inspected and if he had our dog with him and despite all the rules about dogs on leads through farm fields he would let our dog off the lead as it is actually much safer that way. The cows will chase after the dog, ignore the human and the dog can outrun the cows and get out of the way. No harm done that way. (Although that wouldn't be a good idea if the dog was untrained and wouldn't come to call - then it's best to avoid the field altogether)

I saw the story about the teacher on the news and thought - how very sad.

justjill said...

I am sorry the man lost his life but thought people knew not to go anywhere cows with calf at foot.

John Going Gently said...

During COVID the postman only delivers once a week here
But he passes the cottage every day
I’m so pissed off

Marjorie said...

Sorry to hear of the man's death. I would have thought people who walk through fields would be aware of the risks. I certainly wouldn't and I live with cows. I do agree about letting the dog go free as that is what the cows viewed as a threat, not the man.

Heather said...

Poor man, but I know from experience that cows do not like dogs in their field.
Those snails must have look very sweet but I hope they were not moving in the direction of your garden!

Cro Magnon said...

I have no fear of cows, or even bulls, but I never venture into a field where there are calves. I thought this was basic countryside wisdom.

the veg artist said...

In my childhood, we could 'post' a letter in the box outside the village church. The letter, and the money for a stamp, would be inside a brown paper bag. The postman would buy and put the stamps on the letter for us!

thelma said...

There is an article in the Guardian about cows and walking through the fields where they are, with advice from the Farmers Union, they state don't run, walk slowly.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/sep/23/farmers-union-issues-warning-after-teacher-trampled-to-death-by-cows

Tom Stephenson said...

Yes, I heard about that man. I have a friend who was badly injured by cows. I never want to walk through cows at any time of the year. I am scared of them.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks everyone - as you all say - basic countryside law as far as cows are concerned. Sadly too late for the chap who was killed - he was a popular Deputy Head and taken so early in his life. I think of his wife waving him off on what was probably his winding down walk after school and then not seeing him alive again. Doesn't bear thinking about does it?