Tuesday, 12 July 2011

"Set in."

In spite of the barometer being very high and the weather forecaster saying there would only be showers here and there today, here in our part of the Dale it has what the farmer calls "set in."

We live in the lee of the Pennines and that makes all the difference to our weather. What has been falling out of the sky since mid-morning is hardly what you would call rain, it is just a thick, fine mist. The fine drops are so close together that you are wet through in a minute. If I was up here on holiday then this is the kind of day I would call a "horrible day."

As it is, the farmers who happen to have grass down for first or second crop silage must be really cursing it, as the whole lot will be wet and soggy. The run to the supermarket this morning and the walk round the fields this afternoon produced nothing worthy of a photograph, so I am sorry to say that my blog today is just a moan about the rain!

N>B> When I say "run" to the supermarket I do not mean on my two legs!!!

11 comments:

MorningAJ said...

I hate it when it doesn't rain properly but you still get drenched. I don't mind a proper downpour but half and half is no good to anyone. Mind you - they say it's going to be raining pretty heavily down here by the end of the week.

Heather said...

We've just had a rather grey day but no moisture. We really do have to make the most of each fine day as no two seem to be alike this year. Poor Farmer - more problems.

angryparsnip said...

One of the things I so enjoy about your blog is how it is the opposite of where I live.
What you are talking about, a fine wet mist/fog (what I so loved when I lived in Laguna Beach) would be a blessing to us in the Sonoran Desert.
We only have two very short rainy seasons in Tucson.
The Winter rains nourish the land and fill up our aquifer, and the Summer rains that can be but not always destructive but still help.

Hope tomorrow is Sunny for you and the Farmer !

cheers, parsnip

Bovey Belle said...

Ah, we had a dose of the proper stuff this afternoon - pretty well torrential, and accompanied by an extremely noisy thunderstorm - first clap of thunder right overhead and made us all jump!

I feel sorry for the farmers in the middle of doing the silage or hay cut . . .

Gerry Snape said...

I had visions of you togged up in sporty gear with a rucksack on your back beetling off to the supermarket...then I got real!...Tesco is only a hop and a jump from my front door...which is truly wonderful and awfully horrible! Hope the rain eases off for the farmer.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

My father, also a farmer would call it "A wet day with no rain", slightly less and it was known as "Not enough to stop the combines"

steven said...

weaver i remember walking across great shunner fell in just such weather with two friends. we were each of us secretly afraid that this was it. we'd hang up our boots and never be seen again!!! it took one of the lads to suggest a brew up to break the uneasy quiet that came with the weather setting in. it worked the trick! steven

missing moments said...

We sure could use some of that rain here!

Gwilym Williams said...

I expect you know this one, but it's a new one for me.

A farmer wins a million pounds on the lottery. His wife asks him what they are going to do with all the money. Says the farmer, We'll keep on farming till it has all gone.

35C predicted here today. Bit TOO hot!

ChrisJ said...

Now if the air was warm and there was no wind I would love that kind of rain. When we lived in Derbyshire I loved to walk in it. If we ever have weather like that here (rare) I call it an English summer's day:)

Granny Sue said...

I would welcome your misty, soggy day here in the West Virginia mountains, Pat. It has been 90+ degrees for most of July, my least favorite weather. We are watering as much as we can between the rare rains. Last Friday it rained all day, a real blessing.