Friday, 19 May 2017

Tracking things down.

As you know I shall fairly shortly (all being well) be leaving the farm for the last time and moving into a bungalow.   This will be a wrench as this is the longest I have ever lived anywhere (twenty four years), but it is inevitable and in any case this house is far too large for one person to live in.

One of the things I shall be sad to leave behind is my Aga cooker, which has served me well.   We bought it new twenty four years ago.   It has kept us well-fed, kept the kitchen and the fabric of the house warm and kept the water very hot.   Now I shall be leaving all that behind.

There is one difficulty with Agas - it is almost impossible to clean them when they are 'on' (which is all the time).   The surface of the cooker is so hot that anything you try to clean it with dries before it has any impact.  So it is best to give the whole cooker a good going over when you switch it off for its six monthly service.

But one thing remains which has been troubling me.   There is a solid shelf, sometimes called the 'cold plain shelf' or the 'cooling shelf'.   I have used it constantly throughout the life of the Aga.   It started out 'silver' but is now black and no amount of elbow grease will get it back to its original newness.

I have written to Aga and to various suppliers and been totally unable to get a replacement.   I am useless at such things.   My daughter in law heard of my plight and in about half an hour had located one only ten miles away at an Aga supplier.  Brand new, it cost only fifteen pounds and this afternoon we drove over and bought it.   Job done.

As a thank you, on the way back, we called in a lovely new cafe which has opened and I treated us to  tea for me, coffee for her and two delicious cakes (Danish with raspberry jam for me and lemon merigue pie with ice cream for her).   So, a successful afternoon all round wouldn't you agree?

21 comments:

Tom Stephenson said...

Yes, I would agree Weave.

justjill said...

I also agree. Particularly as I never got on with my mother in law. On first meeting she told me "He wont marry you." But he did and 37 years later we are still happily together.

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

One more thing to cross off your list. Do you have a specific place in town in mind? -Jenn

The Imperfect Knitter said...

You are such a beautiful ,gracious lady and and I wish you well and much happiness for your future. Reading your blog has had a profound effect on me , thank you so much .

Rosie said...

Mission accomplished! It is so satisfying to find something that has eluded you like the Aga piece. I shall have to move soon too and I am finding hard so your example is inspiring.

A Brit in Tennessee said...

I hope you settle in to your new bungalow nicely. Despite it being a huge change, you won't have all those maintenance worries keeping up with running the farm.
Lovely that you were able to enjoy an afternoon tea break, and also find the shiny Aga shelf you needed.
Hugs,
~Jo

John Gray said...

A new chapter of your life which has been absolutely filled with chapters xxx

donna baker said...

I am so surprised you found the Aga part and inexpensive. They are far too expensive here in the US, but I'd like a go at one just once. I'll be thinking of you Pat, when you move. What an experience, but after you close the door a new world of adventures await.

Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe said...

Leaving things behind can be difficult, but you are going on to another chapter of your life, and you appear willing to take it on with such a positive attitude. You are inspiring.

angryparsnip said...

I am excited to hear all about your move to the next part of your life. Will you have a garden maybe with some chickens ?
All sorts of new experiences for you.
Best wishes for a quick easy move.

cheers, parsnip

Cro Magnon said...

My Aga was ruined by Arthur Scargill. During their silly strike my coal-man couldn't get his usual coal (Thermacite?), so had to import a similar product from Poland. It was filled with tar and completely clogged-up everything.

Rachel said...

A satisfying day.

Gabrielle Howard Gengler said...

I'm fond of lemon meringue pie myself. Nice days give us a sense of warmth and security. Enjoy your weekend.

Librarian said...

Successful indeed! I hope your move to the bungalow will be smooth in all terms. It will take time to adjust, but you are going about it in such a no-nonsense, down-to-earth manner, knowing that it is the right decision.

Minigranny said...

So glad that everything goes well at present. We are in Crete at the moment so I'm not commenting much as it's tricky but still reading your blog. Take care.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

I bet the bungalow will have many advantages for you. Easier to manage and maintain, more airtight and less isolated and it will mark a fresh start as you begin the next chapter of your life. Certainly the right choice.

Heather said...

I had an Aga for two and a half years, about 40 years ago. For the first 6 months I was rather scared of it but we made friends in the end and everything I cooked in or on it, tasted wonderful. It was so comforting on cold winter mornings and I can understand your reluctance to part with it, but how fortunate your purchasers are that you persevered and found a replacement part to keep it looking good.
I hope your move goes to plan - it is good that you will still be near enough to your friends for them to visit regularly.xx

Derek Faulkner said...

I have lived in bungalows all my married lives and would never want to live in a house. Like YP says, they have many advantages, one especially being, not having to climb stairs with creaking, aching legs. You'll love it.

Linda Metcalf said...

Sometimes it's sad to let go but think of yourself and Tess in a new space to walk about! Less to keep up with for you and closer to the shops! Onward and upward.

Joanne Noragon said...

I think it was perfect. All the cookerers were pleased.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for your comments - cheering as usual. As for living in a bungalow - it is not a new experience for me. I lived for six years in one in Lichfield when my son was small and then for seventeen years in one in Wolverhampton when I was teaching there.
But my Physio speaks of "bungalow legs", saying I must keep the muscles in my legs strong by walking up hill (or climbing stairs).