Wednesday, 21 February 2018

A Jolly Jaunt.

Tess and I had a lovely jaunt out today - one of the most enjoyable days for a long time.    We went up over the top of the Pennines, down the other side and ended up in the little town of Sedbergh to meet my God daughter for lunch at Three Hares.

On the way we stopped at Cotter Force (Force is a local word for a waterfall) - one of Tess's favourite spots.  There was no one but us there so early in the morning apart from Mr and Mrs Mallard swimming serenely up Cotter Beck - they made a gigantic fuss when they saw us and flew off, quacking loudly.
I parked where my God daughter works so that I could leave Tess in the shade and then walked the quarter of a mile to the Three Hares.   Lunch was delicious - I had sweet potato and rosemary soup and a smoke salmon and mayo sandwich.   Then together we walked back to the car.

I stopped on the way back to photograph the Howgill Fells - so very different from the rocks of the Dales - I always think they look like green velvet and they are a wonderful backdrop to the little town of Sedbergh.
It was such a lovely day that, much to Tess's delight we stopped on the way back and walked up to Cotter Force again.   It really is such a pretty place.   This time I saw just one couple with an elderly labrador who had a pleasant conversation with Tess before we walked back to the car and began our journey home.   Such a lovely day.


When I was walking into town from where I parked my car I had to pass Sedbergh church.   Here  is the churchyard.   Why is it I wonder that so many churchyards have such brilliant displays of snowdrops?

27 comments:

Derek Faulkner said...

Terrific photos Pat, especially the one of the waterfall. Also terrific to see you and Tess getting out in that way, she must of so enjoyed it

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Lovely photos of a beautiful part of the world. A long time since I've been that way.

Penhill said...

Lovely photos.The Howgills are wonderful,we used to stay at the Cross keys and walk up to Cautley Spout,a bit beyond us now I am afraid.It sounds as if you and Tess had a day to remember.

Jules said...

What a beautiful walk Pat, and it looks like you had a lovely day for it. X

Rachel Phillips said...

Snowdrops were planted in churchyards because they flower on Candlemas Day at the beginning of February and are symbols of purity. Candlemas Day is when Jesus was presented at the Temple and the white candles were for Mary. I like your photographs

Bovey Belle said...

What beautiful scenery and I am so glad you had such a lovely day out, and two little walks in the most beautiful of places too. Plus a lovely lunch by the sound of things. A bit of sunshine makes SUCH a difference.

Thanks to Rachel Phillips for the info on the Churchyard Snowdrops. Something I didn't know.

Share my Garden said...

Lovely photos, Weaver, they make me long to be 'home'! We shall be in the Dales for Easter.

Joanne Noragon said...

Yes, the fells are beautiful.
I have a snowdrop theory. People have planted them because they do bloom so early, they do not interfere with a groundskeeper's spring work, and they make the relatives who have left so happy. I know this because I planted crocus, anemone and snowdrops all around my family plot. I planted them because my brother's eight year old daughter wanted red flowers there.

Mac n' Janet said...

What a beautiful day you've had.

justjill said...

Beautiful. Yorkshire has a lot going for it. Sometimes wonder why I left.

donna baker said...

Sounds like a wonderful day. I finally saw a tulip frond peeking out of the soil and we have had rain.

John Gray said...

That last photo could have been taken in Trelawnyd

Sue in Suffolk said...

What a lovely day you have had. Weather forecast is for very cold for several days so it was good you got out and about today

Bonnie said...

Thank you for sharing such beautiful photos! I agree that Howgill Fells does look like velvet! It does sound like you and Tess have had a lovely day. I am so happy for you both.

lynney62 said...

I so enjoy reading your daily blog! Thank you for writing. I am currently reading "Seasons of My Life...Tales of a solitary Daleswoman", Hannah Hauxwell w/ Barry Cockcroft. It is a fascinating story of times past in a land I knew almost nothing about until I found your blog and then, Hannah's books....I am awaiting Amazon delivery of "Daughter of The Dales" which I plan to read next. Again, just wanted to say "thanks" to you for blogging and opening a new and fascinating world for me to explore! :)

angryparsnip said...

What a wonderful day out with such beauty all around you. Your photos are lovely.
Oh am sure Tess had a great day with all the new sniffs and walks.

cheers, parsnip

Cro Magnon said...

One of the things I've always wanted in my garden is a river/stream. There is something so soothing about flowing water.

Librarian said...

Thank you for telling us about your lovely day out and showing us your pictures! Also thank you, Rachel, for the info about snowdrops in church yards.
Yorkshire really IS a beautiful place, no matter the weather, but like every place, it is even greater in the sunshine.
I wonder how you know Cotter Force is Tess' favourite spot. Does she show more enthusiasm when you walk her there than during other walks?

The Weaver of Grass said...

Cotter, now that we have left the farm, is the one place where I can let her off the lead.
Thanks Rachel for the info.

thelma said...

Well a happy day was had by both of you. Of course Rachel's explanation for the abundance of snowdrops in the churchyards must be right, occasionally we forget how our plants are named after religious events, the devil has a lot to answer for when he produced all those poisonous plants!

Gwil W said...

What a lovely county is Yorkshire. And your photos do it justice. Well done!

Heather said...

Thank you for sharing your beautiful photos with us Pat. The scenery is breathtaking and the names of the area bring so many literary heroes and heroines to mind. No wonder you and Tess enjoyed your day so much.

Sarah said...

And of course it was the Knight Crusaders who brought the snowdrops and/or bulbs back from the Holy Lands which is why old monasteries and abbeys often have the best displays. Truly stunning scenery beautifully photographed, thank you.

Tom Stephenson said...

What a lovely area you live in, Weave.

Countryside Tales said...

Majestic land, how beautiful. It sounds a lovely day out. The reason church yards do so well with wild flowers is because they've never been ploughed etc. They're a pretty rare resource as a result. Gods Acre is a wonderful book that explains it all in detail with lovely drawings throughout.

Ruth said...

This is another wonderful example of why I dearly love to read your blog. Thank you so much for sharing your days in your beautiful countryside! You do have the makings of a wonderful book, you know.

Sol said...

I might be wrong but I thought that snowdrops symobilised grief. Grief, new beginnings (death and rebirth)