Sunday, 3 January 2021

What a morning.

 What a morning indeed.   My carer came at half past seven and the roads were like a skating rink she said.   Someone had thoughtlessly parked their vehicle directly opposite my drive and so my carer was worried about backing out without hitting their car (she managed perfectly).   Looking out of the window at it snowing was quite pretty but now - two hours later - that snow has turned to rain and it is just miserable and wintry.   A day to stay inside I would say.  There was a time, years ago, when we more or less knew what weather to expect at what time of the year - but now this no longer applies and we are therefore quite surprised when we get wintry weather to start our New Year.

Our News today (well every day at present) is dominated by Covid and whether or not schools should reopen tomorrow.   What started out as simple (ish) instructions - some Secondary school pupils would go back a week late and some a fortnight late and most Primaries would open tomorrow - has now developed into a complex argument as Teaching Unions step in.   Thankfully I am no longer a teacher (long retired) but if I was I would worry about catching Covid if I was back in school and I would worry about my pupils missing school and vital lessons.   And I expect this is how most teachers feel.   And, as usual, whatever happens the poorer, less able children will suffer most - as they always do - while most of those from better-equipped, richer homes will benefit.   But then it has always been so.

I try to rise above it all as I can do nothing at all about it.   But sometimes it is hard to put it out of one's mind.   I sit here and wait to be called for my vaccination (I am 88) and at the same time think that maybe it would be fairer to vaccinate teachers and Health workers first anyway - I have had a full and happy life and am not likely to live all that much longer anyway.

After breaking my hip I am beginning to make a better recovery and feel that once I can get a breakfast trolley with brakes (I had my second fall when my trolley decided to run away with me) I shall soon be able to manage without my carers.   I intend to ring my Physio tomorrow when things are all back to normal and discuss the trolley with brakes and whether it is suitable. In the meantime I have ordered another pair of boots - I have worn slippers far too long - this week is the first time I have walked in boots rather than slippers and already I am feeling the benefit.

Until tomorrow dear friends......

30 comments:

Carruthers said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Carruthers said...

I'm sure school should be shut. I read that schools are thought to be second only to supermarkets as a source of transmission.

Salis populi suprema lex esto - The welfare of the people shall be the supreme law.
Cicero ( 106 BC - 43 AD)


(I deleted this comment first time - it got well mangled up somehow!)

thelma said...

There is an outcry in social media from doctors and nurses as well who are overwhelmed by the Covid patients. We have still to see the results of the Xmas holiday period on the hospitals to. I have a feeling we need someone with the wisdom of Solomon to weigh the balance of freedom for our children to go back to school against the ever increasing Covid patients.

Derek Faulkner said...

Absolutely absurd sending children back to school tomorrow. Here we are with hospitals at bursting point with Covid patients and hospital staff burnt out and yet children are expected to go back to school, many from households that might unknowingly be infected from Christmas and New Year mixing. There they can potentially infect each other and take it back to parents and grandparents - madness!

DUTA said...

Open schools lead to a rise in the numbers of infected in the population, as kids and teenagers are considered significant asymptomatic spreaders of the virus.

Heather said...

I think all schools should be closed, and it would avoid any unfairness. Teachers would be protected also.
So good to hear you are making such good progress and I hope you will get a few days when you can venture out even for a short way, to enjoy a little fresh air.

Salty Pumpkin Studio said...

Carts without brakes are scary. I hope you find a good one that is sturdy with brakes.

Great quote posted by Carruthers

Mary said...

Where I live in the US, the schools have been virtual since March. The new school year started in late August with much improved system in place (not using Zoom as some schools had hackers invading classrooms), but there are still technical issues. I have been supervising the virtual schooling of my 6 year old GS since August. It is a full time job (good thing I'm retired) and I feel for parents who are working and trying to keep up with all that this entails. It is a considerable amount of work. My GS's teacher is a gem. She has 24 first grade students to oversee on a screen and works so very hard to keep them all engaged and current on their work--clearly putting in long, long days to ensure posting of materials and assignments. Some children whose family's are without internet are bused to the school where they have set up what they call a digital cafe in the gym, several others are in daycare settings (wearing headphones and masks) and the rest are in their homes. After all this time, it is easy to tell which students have the advantage of an adult closely supervising their work and which ones are sadly disadvantaged, despite all the teacher/school does to assist. Our virus numbers are very bad right now and though the school board indicated we would go to a hybrid model in mid-January (half class in school one week/half in the next--with the teacher having to teach both those present in the room and those on the screen--which is impossible), but I don't see schools opening anytime soon. No easy answers.

Maudie said...

So relieved that your recovery is proceeding well now.

Anonymous said...

I don't wish to offend you but I wonder if you're getting depressed and would benefit from your Doctor's help? You do sound very down and gloomy these days. I know we have the Covid situation to deal with but that's no different than the past 9 months and you've managed to keep cheery until now. Sometimes depression can happen after having a general anaesthetic .

Your comment that you're not likely to live all that much longer is another sign of depression, almost a giving up. You're 88, if you live to be a hundred you've got another 12 years to enjoy life, isn't that something to be glad about? Lunches out for many years!

If you don't want to seek medical help perhaps try to focus on the good things in life that you do have - you're not in poverty and can treat yourself, you enjoy lovely meals that are delivered to you, you have friends to talk to, you've recovered brilliantly well from your operation and are getting more mobile, there are people that care about you. So many people have nothing or not very much.

We're all getting down about the current situation, I am too, but for the sake of our mental health we have to keep optimistic and try to enjoy the things we can still do. I too am getting older and miss the days of my youth when I wasn't continually hampered by arthritis but I try every day to be thankful for the small things that I can still enjoy. This afternoon I'm in front of the fire, cosy on the sofa with a cup of tea, browsing blogs and I have music and books. I spent the morning doing a few household jobs, had a chat on the phone with a friend and looked forward to this afternoon.

Cherish the small things, there will be a time when we can get out and about again, try to keep optimistic.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Anonymous - you certainly haven't offended me - I am grateful for your concern. I don't think I am getting depressed. I have two super carers who are always cheerful and keep me going every day. My son rings me daily and we have a good chat. I have all my blog friends to cheer me up and lots of friends to phone. As to commenting that I am not likely to live that much longer - when one reaches 88 it is easy to look upon death without much in the way of depression or fear - just as an inevitability sooner or later. And I certainly cherish the small things - a drawing from my Great Grand daughter of four is now on my notice board and how much more grown up it is than the one she sent me a year ago.

Ellen D. said...

I think you are doing very well, Pat. You look for the positive things in your life and you have many social contacts to visit with and keep your spirits up. Good luck with a new walker with brakes - that shows you are determined to do more. I wonder what you will call this one? Stay well!

Debby said...

I think that you're doing quite well, Pat. I think that you are a realist. My own mother was like that. I remember that there was a time that she had to be admitted to a rehab after a bad bout. We had just discovered her illness was terminal. A social worker came to interview her at the facility the first day she was there to evaluate her mental state. One of the questions was, 'Do you think about dying?' My mother had just been diagnosed with liver failure, and her answer was, "Yes. It has been on my mind." The social worker labeled her as depressed. She wasn't, not at all.

You are also a realist when you talk about poor children taking the brunt of this pandemic more squarely than the children of the well to do. Money affords you options. Poor children have less options available to them. How do I know this? My grandson is one of those children. He comes for his lessons here, because at home there is not internet. They cannot afford it. Not all kids have that option. Not all kids have a parent at home to help them navigate the intricacies of zoom and school. Some parents HAVE to work. Not all grandparents are willing/able to take it on.

I have always viewed you as a realist, and sensible.

Librarian said...

Pat, you are one of the most upbeat people I know in blogland, and reading your posts is almost always like having my daily dose of cheer in the morning, which is my usual blog-reading time before starting work.
At 88, thinking that you are not going to be around all that much longer is more a sign or realistic contentment than of depression. Even I, at 52, can realistically say that there are most likely less years ahead of me than behind.
You enjoy your meals, your reading, your mind games in the paper, your favourite TV programs and so much more in your daily life. Really, you are an example to all of us!

Schools here were supposed to reopen on the 11th, but it looks like they will stay closed - or at least for the majority of classes - until the end of January. Our politicians will announce their decisions about contiunation of the current lockdown on Tuesday. I won't be surprised if it will be prolonged, makes sense after the numbers of infections and deaths still not going down.

justjill said...

Matter of fact is not depression. xxx

A Smaller Life said...

I don't know why Anonymous thinks you are depressed, you always come across as one of the more cheery and optimistic bloggers, it's the rest of us that are miserable buggers!! My Mum at almost 81 is also very realist, although only to me. If she mentions her own future demise, her DNR or anything negative to my brother he takes it very badly, so I bear the brunt of all the funerial, bad health talk etc

I was reading only today that the vaccinations are starting with the elderly as this has been proven in other places to immediately take the most pressure off the health service, as it is the older age groups that require the most intensive nursing. It does make sense that way even though my first thought was that NHS staff, carers and teaching staff should have it first.

busybusybeejay said...

Depressed? Absolutely not .You are so positive and an inspiration for me.
I am worried about teachers going back tomorrow.My daughter is a Reception Class teacher but she is also a Type 1 diabetic.What a position to be in.
Please ,Gavin Willamson,close schools.No mention of teachers,support staff etc getting the vaccine.Scandalous.
You take care Pat and keep positive blogging.
Barbarax

Sue in Suffolk said...

I can't imagine you being depressed -ever.
No idea who should get the vaccine first - it's debatable if giving it to elderly people who are at home most or all the time is right but as Sue says it's been done that way to take pressure off the NHS. I'd would happily pass on my vaccine to someone younger and stay at home longer if that helped get children back to school and nurses and doctors back to work

Red said...

Yes the little guys who struggle will be left behind even more. They were my favorite kids to teach.

Alice Cove said...

Please don’t worry about Primary School Teachers, Primary Schools have a magic force field around them that the virus cannot penetrate, they are quite safe as our leader has told us. The Primary Schools are open so that parents can go to work and keep the economy open, a month off school could soon be caught up with some co operation from parents and teachers, cannon fodder as usual. Alice Cove,

Bonnie said...

Brrr, it does sound cold there! We had a big snow on New Year's Eve so all is white here. It is pretty to look at and I'm not going out anyway. How nice that you ordered new boots. Proper fitting shoes can make a difference in getting around I think. Enjoy your evening Pat!

John Going Gently said...

Keep walking pat

The Weaver of Grass said...

Smaller Life - good point about elderly vaccinations taking pressure off NHS - thanks for pointing that out.

Lovely positive replies - thank you all - boosted my confidence.

wherethejourneytakesme2 said...

I would say my mum who will be 95 in a few days time is suffering from depression and has been in tears everyday now for so long and there is little we can do. In one year she has gone from being very active to just having to sit alone in her flat all day with nothing but the TV for company until either my sister, a carer or occasionally I get to visit. With her bad hip (she is on the waiting list for a replacement hip) and now shoulder just walking with the walker is difficult - adding in the lack of company from friends because of the virus and I can see why she is feeling so down. I ring her everyday but it is so difficult to lift her spirits. In comparison I would agree with you that you are not showing signs of depression just expressing your difficulties. Take care.

CharlotteP said...

My Mom has a trolley with brakes; she can also use it as a seat...it's been brilliant for keeping her mobile. Don't watch the news too often; you will be far more cheerful!

Joanne Noragon said...

I'm glad you are back in proper boots. Slippers aren't good for the long haul.

Susan said...

You are making an excellent recovery. If a trolley with brakes gives you greater safe mobility it seems very important. New boots along with your plan to do more walking is great.

Cro Magnon said...

I believe the virus can only last a short while outside of a human body, so really a total lockdown for a few weeks should have it eliminated. Anyone showing signs would then have to totally isolate. Maybe they should have done this last March.

angryparsnip said...

I have had several walkers or trolley ? the brakes work well at first but you need to have them checked often. The brakes seem to give way after a few months.
Good Luck.

The Weaver of Grass said...

I have contacted the Physio this morning and is calling to discuss the trolley with brakes - once she says I will benefit I shall order it and then I can again carry my meals from cooker to table with ease - another hurdle crossed.
Thanks everyone.