Thursday, 8 December 2016

Out.

Into Northallerton to M and S Food this afternoon for a few more bits and pieces of food for the Christmas week-end.   Saadly all the pigs in blankets had gone, so I shall try in our little town in the morning.   Soon my freezers will be full so at least I know we shall not starve over the festive period.   We really do all behave as though a siege is about to happen don't we.

In a way it has all got a bit out of hand.   I know that whether or not we have food on our tables at Christmas will make not a scrap of difference to people starving in countries like Syria and Yemen, but I did watch the special item on the News the other evening about Yemen and the plight of babies and small children especially - and everyone else of course - reduced me to tears.   How can I justify worrying about whether or not I have pigs in blankets on my Christmas table when I think of those poor people who have nothing, not even enough food to stay alive.

Sad to say that any spirit of Christmas is sadly lacking in the world today and we can do little to right the situation.

16 comments:

Joanne Noragon said...

It is beyond our small strength to do more than keep our own small plot tidy and fair and be the voice of reason that may swell. I think you do this wonderfully.
Since we will not be home for the week of Christmas, our job is to be sure a lot of food leaves the refrigerator.

Rachel said...

We can each do something and believe in what we are doing.

jinxxxygirl said...

You have such a big heart Pat. I love that about you though i know it causes you pain...Perhaps you can reach out to some in your community that need a little help that you can provide...Its difficult to help those that are so far away.. Hugs! deb

Simon Douglas Thompson said...

Pigs and Blankets gone already? It's only the 8th! Had my work's canteen Xmas SChool Dinner day today, rather bland.

Bovey Belle said...

We make our own pigs in blankets, on the day - this is where my daughters swing into action!

I am with you though, it is hard to think of others suffering such deprivation and fear, when our needs are met in nearly every way.

galant said...

Why not make the pigs-in-blankets yourself? They are, after all, only little sausages wrapped in streaky bacon and wouldn't take long to make, surely? Yes, another job, but like instant custard, not really necessary when we can make these things ourselves (and often better) eh? Perhaps they will stock more p-in-b before Christmas?
Margaret P

Terra Hangen said...

Yes, there is a lot of need in the world, that is certain. We all do a little to help which adds up to a lot. Sometimes when I am moaning (or a family member) about some little inconvenience I smile and say "that is a first world problem", as opposed to third world problems like having enough to eat, etc. I do hope you find your pigs in a blanket though to make your holidays festive.

Fairtrader said...

Pigs in blanket????
Sad to say I agree with you Pat, there has been something very important lost along the way. In Sweden Santa is calling" are there any good children in here?" The truth is that none of us are particularly good, but we get all these presents anyway. And table filled with food and beverage, candy and cakes. If christians highjacked the pagan seasons, the merchants truelly highjacked the inner sense of Christmas. Every year we peak last years commercial record, the rush is unbelievable and now we have inherited the Black Friday and Cyber Monday as holy dates to mark in the calender. You said it right, Terra, much of this we feel musn't fail really is a first world problem!!! And yes, we can all do something for those poor souls left out in the dark, knowing nothing about light, comfort and safety, let alone food enough to last the day. So many ways to help, we just need to slow down and let the feeling of the season, the Christmas light, fill our hearts. Oh oh, I'm preaching again!!!
Good luck with those piggies, I for one have to deal with the Vörtbröd and the Janzons frestelse. Not to mention Lussekatter.... Blessings!!

Cro Magnon said...

As Christmas Day is on a Sunday this year, there is really no need to stock-up on food. If we treat our big meal as just another Sunday Lunch or supper (but a bit more 'grand'), with some left-overs for Boxing Day, then all will be back to normal on the Tuesday. I shall buy my Turkey and Sprouts on Christmas Eve.

I'm afraid this year has more world conflict than I've ever previously known. It's only a matter of luck that you and I were born in countries where peace reigns. I shall be thinking of those poor people, but, frustratingly, I know that I can do nothing.

Derek Faulkner said...

I've long been appalled at the double standards of people in this country who end up buying and eating twice as much over Christmas as they need to, with fridges and freezers bulging "just in case we need it". They then sit there over Christmas showing concern about people in other countries who are starving. Then of course, they then go out just before New Year and buy another load of food "just in case somebody comes round". Me, I keep it nice and simple and in reality buy no more then my normal weekly shop.

Librarian said...

If I really want to make a difference, all I need to do is go and help someone in my immediate neigbhourhood. My hometown houses several thousands of refugees, and some of them are Christians and celebrate Christmas. Town council has set up a big tree in the entrance of Town Hall where everyone is invited to leave a shoebox filled with things that can be useful to either an adult (male or female), young person or child. There is always a need for even the most basic things such as shower gel and tooth paste, and they certainly do not spend what little money they have on luxuries such as make-up and chocolate. So maybe I shall do that this year. An alternative would be to welcome an otherwise lonely, maybe homeless, person into the family for Christmas Eve, but that's up to my parents to decide, since they are hosting the dinner.
I won't be eating at home most of the time, so my fridge won't be filled with much more than what I usually need - which is little for a mostly single household.

M & S will probably get more pigs-in-blankets in before Christmas, I guess.

Coppa's girl said...

We have long since eschewed the over indulgences of Christmas and New Year. We eat out at a restaurant on 25th, so we won't have a fridge and freezer bulging with food we most likely won't eat. We send mostly e cards, and only a few "proper" cards, so the money saved is rounded up and sent to charity.
I don't know if there is any way we can directly help the starving people in Syria, and other parts of the world. This needs to be tackled by governments, with our support.

Sue said...

I hate the commercial and 'greedy' side of Christmas. For me it's a time for family and celebrating the good things of life.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

I put in an extra shift at the Oxfam shop yesterday afternoon. Raising money for Oxfam and other frontline charities has a beneficial outcome for many people in crisis. But it is disgraceful that the United Nations and various pontificating governments frequently stand idly by.

Elizabeth said...

Well, the kiddies are still innocent and thrilled by the whole thing.
This makes me happy too.
And it makes me happy to give what I can - which should be more.
So let's try to hug our friends closer and so on.
The world has always been a big mess - it's just that we get to hear about it more and more.
And yes! I do hope the pigs in a blanket reappear. Gretchen, aged 4, thinks they are the very very best thing ever!
I am endeavoring to make my cards this year and am woefully late.......

Heather said...

I daresay these dreadful events have always occurred but at present we have such full on media coverage that it all seems much worse. The feeling of helplessness is so destructive and depressing. We must all appreciate what we do have and not waste it, and be generous donors to those charities that can make a difference.
I am going to have to write my Christmas cards this weekend, and wont need a long Christmas shopping list as we will be very quiet this year.