Tuesday, 24 November 2015

Phenomena

There seems to me to be a phenomenon whereby even if the temperature rises on the thermometer it still feels colder.   After several days when there was a frost, today the temperature was eight degrees when I awoke and it has stayed around that mark; and yet, because it is damp and rather miserable, it feels so much colder.   This tends to suggest that how cold one feels is all in the mind.

It is the dampness which makes the cold feel as though it has got through to the bones.   I really think I could do with borrowing Cro's hat (if you haven't seen it do go to Magnon's Meanderings - I think he looks rather handsome in it).

Today, to my absolute joy, the long-tailed tits have arrived on the fat balls.   They come every Winter and if other years are anything to go by then once they have found them they do tend to visit every day.  Blackbirds are also arriving in large numbers so I have begun scattering crumbs for them.   They also love suet.   One of the pleasures of Winter is the bird life round here.

Keep warm wherever you are.

20 comments:

Frugal in Derbyshire said...

ooh long tailed tits, my joint favourite with the nuthatch. Each winter they visit our fat balls in numbers and look for all the world like a game of kerplunk!

Mac n' Janet said...

You're right, the damp always makes it feel colder than it is. I don't think we have the long-tailed tits here, he's sure a cutey.

Frances said...

What you've written about damp and chill has reminded me of my childhood winters in Virginia. The degrees on the thermometer never quite expressed how cold being outdoors felt to me. Here in NYC, it's a different sort of winter. Lots of wind blowing around the tall buildings can take your breath away.

I do envy you having those birds coming to visit the buffet you're serving them.

Best wishes...stay warm!

The Broad said...

The damp and the dark make me feel the cold. Sunset is now at 4.00 p.m. and a month to go for the days to continue shortening. Nice that you have such interesting bird life and know how to attract them. I do miss the birds that came to my parents New England home -- this time of year we would get wild turkeys parading around -- though they were usually smart enough to make their appearance on the day after Thanksgiving!

Derek Faulkner said...

Totally agree re. the damp and the cold, today on the reserve in the rain and the wind and temps. of +9 degrees it felt colder than yesterday's frost and sunshine.
Every time that I put out fat balls, Starlings arrive like a plague of locusts and repeatedly come back until they're all gone. 10 fat balls will be gone in two days.

Wilma said...

I know what you mean; the damp air seems to suck the heat right out of your bones!

Joanne Noragon said...

Deepening cold is the scourge of old age. My sister is ten years younger than I, still wearing one shirt and a light jacket to go out. Oh, and has not put socks on, yet. If I had no broken arm to deal with, I'd have on my wool pullover undershirt, then turtleneck, then dense cotton shirt. As it stands now, just the turtleneck and a big cotton shirt and a hoodie. I am cold until I get under the douvet at night.

angryparsnip said...

We get so many different birds all year here. I need to get my bird book out and see who is just stopping by.
It is always colder in the morning after the sun comes in Tucson. The cold and damp warms up and rises so the morning temperatures can drop before the sun warms everything up. But we have sun most of our winter.
But I agree damp always makes me feel colder.

cheers, parsnip







Sue in Suffolk said...

Still waiting for the long tails here, they are in the hedges down the road but slow to move into the garden.

Terry and Linda said...

I love the winter birds also!!!

Linda

Heather said...

You are right about a damp day feeling colder than the thermometer might suggest. I managed a bit of tidying in the garden today but the soil is too wet for digging out large weeds.
I love longtailed tits - they are so pretty. My husband has just cleaned out all the nest boxes we have dotted about the garden. I hope we get plenty of 'residents' next spring.

Hildred said...

It is very cold here today, - a bitterly cold wind. When I first woke all was still. The street light was shining on the new snow and it looked quite magical, but then the bitter wind arose and I am staying close to the fireplace this afternoon.

Pictures from yesterday are beautiful Pat, - I wish you a warmer day tomorrow.

Doc said...

The cold makes my arthritis a problem but still managed to put in a full day in the garden. I also made a trip to the feed store for more bird seed. Our winter visitors are voracious feeders.

Cro Magnon said...

I remember as a young boy finding a Long Tailed Tit's beautiful nest, and trying to work out how they would fit the tail into it. Exquisite birds.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

So often when I've been out bird-watching and nothing much has been about I've heard the seep-seep-seep-seep of Long-tailed Tits as if they're saying "Cheer up; we're here!". It seems they've come to brighten your chilly grey day too.

Rachel said...

There is a rawness in the air and in the world. It is what makes it feel colder than it is.

thelma said...

A favourite, long tailed tits, they come through the garden, on what I call the breakfast/lunch/dinner trail. It is cold, the damp seeps through to the bones, and north winds don't help. Stay warm X

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thank you for calling andcontributing.
Interesting what Cro says about finding a long-tailed tit's nest. I saw one once in a silver birch tree and I photographed it. Rather think I put it on my blog. I sent the photograph to RSPB and they kept it for future use.

meigancam01 said...

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Midmarsh John said...

I love to see the LTTs. Here they only visit occasionally when passing through.