Sunday, 8 November 2015

Fungus

To say that it has been wet here is a bit of an understatement.   Yesterday we had an inch of rain and although it was lovely and sunny first thing this morning we have already had one heavy downpour and it looks a bit stormy again.   'Abigail' is due to hit us later tonight, although it is going to be worse further North.

The farmer took my camera with him on his morning walk with Tess and took these photographs of fungi growing under the trees.  Just the time of year for them:



23 comments:

The History Anorak said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tom Stephenson said...

I think that the third one isn't a fungus, but more likely to be insect activity, like 'Cuckoo Spit'.

Rachel said...

Cuckoo spit? Looks more like the cuckoo threw up.

Tom Stephenson said...

Or worse. Let's not forget where we are...

Rachel said...

Yes, but Weave is very broad minded.

Elizabeth said...

Hope you weather the storm OK.
Fungus pretty but a bit dicey to eat - I think!

Heather said...

A good selection of fungus. We get clumps of the very tiny ones and ink caps in our garden much to my husband's annoyance but I don't think they do any harm.

donna baker said...

I have heard the red ones are very poisonous and the white stuff looks like an enormous amount of reptilian spermaceti. That storm sounds bad. I've seen pictures of swells in the north Atlantic sweeping over lighthouses that haunt me. I'm a landlubber as you can tell.

Mac n' Janet said...

Uh-oh, someone took a bite of the red one, aren't they poisonous? We're have a drizzle here, other parts of Georgia are getting soaked. Hope it cools us down.

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

We get the odd mushroom growing in our lawn in certain places. I have never seen anything like the third photograph. Don't even know if it grows here. -Jenn

Emily Rivron said...

Some pretty fungus, lovely colours. The cream one is so unusual I've never seen anything like that x

Cro Magnon said...

re Heather: My neighbour had a thousand Ink Caps growing on his lawn, and he just mowed them. Idiot, they're delicious.

The Weaver of Grass said...

That third one is certainly very odd, although the farmer assures me we get it every year. He likened it to dog-sick. But Tom and Rachel - yes I hope I am broad minded so liken it to whatever you like - the more descriptive the better.

angryparsnip said...

I hope the storm will miss you and no flooding up North.

cheers, parsnip

Gwil W said...

On my tv weather map there's no sign of Britain. Just a big white blob like one of your fungi.

Wilma said...

The first one is probably Russula emetica and although it does make humans vomit as advertised, it is not deadly. Lots of animals eat it with no apparent harm. The third one is probably a white slime mold. Google slime mold and see what you think. Nice shots!

Frances said...

Weaver, I learned lots from the photos and text of your post, and the prior comments, too.

How I do enjoy visiting here. xo

Hildred said...

What interesting growth. Is any of it edible? We seldom see these fungi, being in a semi desert area, but every once in a while if there are more than two days of rain in a row they will sprout up.

Dawn McHugh said...

Great photos, thanks for sharing, we are being hit with high wind and torrential rain at the moment and it looks like its here for most of the week :-)

The Weaver of Grass said...

Wilma has a possible answer to that third picture, so thanks for that Wilma.

Gwil's reply is more scary - is he suggesting that fungus is gradually eating away our country??

Derek Faulkner said...

http://greenieinthewild.blogspot.co.uk/

Pat, have a look at the blog above, it might give you some ideas re. fungi

Terry and Linda said...

Ours are all dead here...frozen solid. Gone for the year.

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com
https://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com/sherlock-boomer


stuart dunlop said...

I seem to have missed your request for id., but the 'massy' specimen in photo 3 is a Slime Mould - one of the Myxomycetes. These were previously allocated to fungi, but are now considered to be closer to animals, since some have the ability to move. The red one is almost certainly a Russula, but taking it to species isn't possible from the image: we need to perform various tests on cuticle peeling, stipe colour, smell, taste and maybe microscopy of the spores.