Monday, 15 September 2014

Swung by an argument.

I normally sit with the farmer and watch the six o'clock National News - the one time in the day when I hear it, as I just can't bear to hear it every hour on the hour - it is too depressing.   But tonight, after hearing the Headlines I have come out of the television room and on to my computer, as I can no longer stomach hours of the 'Scotland Debate'.  By Thursday the votes will be cast, on Friday the Post-Mortem will begin - it will take another week to die down.

All members of my family have loved a good argument and I grew up with my father (ardently Left Wing) debating issues with my Brother in Law (ardently Conservative).   When my first husband came on the scene (also ardently Left Wing), he and my father got on like a house-on-fire, both being on the same side.   Sadly my Dad died long before I married the farmer (typical farming stock and therefore conservative with a small c), but he would have driven my Dad mad because he would never argue about politics.

But during the whole of that time I never knew anyone to change sides.   Dad stayed   Left and my Brother-in-Law stayed Right.  Because, let's face it, our views are pretty entrenched.   We all think we are right and nobody is going to make us change our minds.

So it does beg the question, why is the Prime Minister spending so much time trekking round Scotland trying to persuade voters to vote the way he wants them to - and similarly why doesn't Alex Salmond sit at home and relax and let people vote how they intend to?

By the week-end we shall all know what is to happen and I can categorically state that within a week the whole issue will have disappeared from our screens, as has the war in Syria and the whole Middle East situation - that will return next week once Scotland has sorted itself out.   Why must the media all centre on one issue and do it to death, then let it disappear from our screens as though it is a thing of the past?

I genuinely believe that it is up to the people of Scotland to decide whether they want indepence or not - and as I am not Scots then I don't waste time thinking about the issue.  Looks desperately like rain outside and my washing hangs on the line, so I must fetch it in - that is the area of my thinking at the moment.   Hope that doesn't sound fascetious but I am truly fed up with the whole issue.
 

10 comments:

Cloudia said...

No, many of us feel the same I'm sure. And just imagine if your News was as puerile as ours!


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jinxxxygirl said...

OH i know the media can just worry something to death....like dog with its favorite bone..... they find a million different ways to say the same thing......uughh i get so tired.... Hugs! deb

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

It's not just the Scottish vote, it's the same with any major news story; the media feel that they have to fill time with it on every bulletin - even if nothing has happened. So we have to listen to the opinions of politicians, experts and Mrs McKay from the Isle of Skye. Even if their thoughts are interesting they are NOT NEWS. What I really want to know is:
Did the washing get dry?

Heather said...

You are quite right to give your washing priority. I can't wait for the result of the voting in Scotland to find out if we need to rebuild Hadrian's Wall and will we need a check point for passport or visa to be checked when we visit Scotland.

Philip said...

Are you happy to have an informed response? I agree the media does sometimes have a short term pre-occupation with a topic which quickly loses coverage. However, in respect of the points you make about the referendum on Scottish independence: this issue cuts across Left and Right perspectives, hence both Cameron and Miliband are on the same side on this issue; it is the small number of floating voters that determine outcomes and in a tight vote persuading these become crucial; it is not just an issue for the Scottish-the outcome could have big implications for the whole UK; if YES wins then this issue will not disappear from the news as there will be lots of debates and decisions to be made about the details leading to setting up a new state. All this does not mean you have to be interested in this bit of the news, however.

John Gray said...

Proper informed consent
It hats what I believe in
Most people vote with a knee jerk mentality pat
That's what I worry about

Cro Magnon said...

Seeing as it's aprox 50/50, one can but wonder if civil war won't break out regardless of the result. One lot are going to be very upset.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Philip's reply is most interesting - that of the floating voter in what might be a close-run contest - makes a lot of sense to me Philip, so thank you for that.

Maureen @ Josephina Ballerina said...

Yup, it's the undecided voters who can make the difference in tight races. But, I wonder if that is only the case in places where one person, one vote in the case? In America we have the whole Electoral College thing which few voters even understand. Thus, a person can win the popular vote but lose the election. At least in presidential elections.
Referendum issues and other elections, I believe, are strictly by popular vote. I will be quite interested to see how the Scottish election turns out on Thursday.
(The whole presidential campaign thing is starting up here already for an election that is two years away. Arrrrrgh!)

thelma said...

Biased news, repetitive news, the answer is not to listen to news, our tuppence worth sinks into a maelstrom of nonsense ;) I use my fingers to vote on issues via the web and there are plenty of organisations out there, including our government website of course. As far as Scotland is concerned it's their vote for their future not mine.......