Wednesday, 9 October 2013

Yesterday I had to go to our (fairly) local hospital to have a cortisone injection into my ankle.  The trouble with my ankle is making me quite immobile some days, so this is the first thing the specialist is trying.

I wasn't looking forward to it.  Anyone who has ever had one will know what I mean - it is a very painful injection.   I couldn't have been more wrong!   First of all I was shown into a room and introduced to a doctor - a charming young man (from Galway and with an accent to match) who spent five minutes explaining exactly what he was going to do.  First he did an ultra-sound and then marked the exact spot where the injection was going to go in.   Then he painted my foot with antiseptic, told me to look away as this would be a bit sharp and then injected an anaesthetic into my ankle.   The pin prick was sharp and there was about ten seconds when it was just a bit painful.   Then came the steroid (usually the most painful thing) - I never felt a single twinge.   Later in the afternoon the farmer had to go to his GP - he has a bad shoulder problem - and he mentioned my steroid injection.   The GP said they could have done it at the surgery but there would have been none of that business - just a straightforward steroid jab.    I know where I will go if I need another!

On the way back as we came into our lane we came up behind .the murderer' as Ronald Blythe calls it in 'Borderlands',   It is a giant machine which cuts back the hedges where they are beginning to encroach on the roadway.   Crash, bang, wallop, it goes along the roadsides slashing away and flinging sticks and branches in all directions (hopefully he clears up after himself).   I complained to the farmer that it left the hedges looking such a mess throughout the Winter and he agreed but said it would rejuvenate in the Spring and the hedges would be better for it.   He may be right but two things struck me.  First - is this really the only time of year when they can do it, because surely it destroys no end of berries which may well be needed by the wild birds this Winter?  Second - wasn't it all the more picturesque when this job was done by one or two men who worked their way along the hedgerow, cutting back neatly, stacking as they went along and finally burning the cuttings creating that wonderful smell of Autumn bonfires which is nothing like so much in evidence these days?

And finally, as I was reading Ronald Blythe early this morning with my first cup of coffee I came across one of those useless pieces of information which I thought I would share with you as it is interesting in the run up to Christmas (sorry if I am the first to mention it) when I hope I shall hear more than once my favourite carol - Adam Lay Bounden - with the line 'and all for an apple, an apple which he took'.  For Blythe says the idea that 'the fall from grace' was caused by an apple is not right.   The misunderstanding arose,  as Blythe says, "Because in St Jerome's Latin Genesis 'malum' is the word for both apple and evil.

I'll bet you didn't know that.  Have a nice day.   It is set to get cold here but the sun is shining gloriously into our South-facing windows and I have to rest my ankle so have no need to go out in it.

13 comments:

Em Parkinson said...

My partner had a similar injection in his shoulder and was utterly petrified. Came out extremely cocky saying it didn't hurt a bit!

John Gray said...

Lol....your head turned by a pretty face x

Elizabeth Wix said...

Loved the apple/evil snippet.
And then Eve's apple was meant to be a pomegranate
which Persephone
used to do something or other....
How everything swirls and whirls...
Well, Christmas is only the month after next...

psobrien said...

I'm having a wonderful day! I have spoken to my sisters, had a nice walk with Duffy and now on our way to Tucson to pick up my new Ashford drum carder! Interesting thing about the apple/evil translation. Good thoughts for your ankle. Shoulder problems must be common for farmers, my dad has the same trouble with his shoulder. I'm looking forward to eighty!
Sandy O' @ My Yellow Swing

Pondside said...

How very interesting to learn about the link, through the old word, between apple and evil.
I'm glad your injection wasn't as bad as it could have been!

Heather said...

I hope that injection does the trick for your ankle. I had a similar one for tennis elbow years ago and it didn't hurt, and I haven't needed another.
I hate those hedge cutters too - they leave everything looking chewed and horrible.
You are quite right - I didn't know the link between malus and evil.

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

Take care - it gave me a start when the title had hospital in it.

Bovey Belle said...

I'm glad your injection wasn't too bad, and that it helps your mobility.

As for the trashers - I loathe them, and think they can't do the branches any good as surely they must leave them so splintered that diseases can get in? Moulds and spores and what have you.

Fascinating to read about the apple/evil link.

MorningAJ said...

I hate those slasher machines and think they should be outlawed. They do nothing to help wildlife and are only helpful to farmers because they are quick. I realise you have to be loyal to The Farmer, but I think it's just wrong. There are better ways to manage hedges.

jill said...

Oh I do feel for you Pat, I had steroid injections into my ankles a while ago now and they are not nice. Take care xxx

Crafty Green Poet said...

glad your injection went well

I often wonder why they can't trim the hedges once the berries have been eaten. I mean it wouldn't be too difficult to organise surely?

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for the visit.

Jayview said...

I'm with you in hating to see beautiful things destroyed - especially when there are other ways to do it. I think some people are a bit colourblind to beauty though. Perhaps as petrol prices rise the balance will tip once more in favour of employing locals. Jean