Saturday, 18 April 2009

Fair daffodils, we weep....




So it is all-change again in the garden as the daffodils begin to die back. Isn't it funny, we long for them to come, poets write long poems about their beauty, we write long diatribes on our blogs about them, and then suddenly one day we begin to say that they are "past their best."



Then it is all downhill - first we have to cut off the dead heads to give the bulbs a chance to replenish themselves for next year; then there is a problem with what to do with the leaves (perhaps Bob can give us a pointer here?); then soon we begin to complain about the strappy leaves - we wish they would go as they look so untidy etc. etc. But at the moment they are just in their dying back stage - and other things are taking over.



The muscari (grape hyacinths) are perhaps the most beautiful blue of any garden flower - in my garden they are very invasive and again the leaves are a nuisance; but at present they are out and their blueness dominates the whole front garden.



But the two things which give me the greatest joy are the weeping cherry in the middle of the lawn, which today is bursting into flower, and Spirea Bridal Wreath which in the next few days will become absolutely smothered with white blossom, so reminiscent of a bridal veil. So today, when I am very busy - people to eat tonight, things to do - I leave you with two images of my garden post-daffodil. Next week my bed of scarlet tulips will be out - now there's a violent splash of colour for you!



Please note## I am not intending to EAT people tonight - so if you are reading this Dominic or Denise - it is quite safe to come!

22 comments:

Rowan said...

What you say about daffodils is very true - I was thinking this morning 'must deadhead the daffoldils'. Fortunately most of mine are naturalized in grass so I tell myself the long grass and wild flowers are 'good for wildlife' but I'm really glad when mid June comes and it can all be mown down.

Derrick said...

Hello Weaver,

It's true how soon the beauty turns to untidiness! Especially roadside banks whose glorious colour turns brown and sad!

We used to have snowdrops, crocus and daffodils in our highland "lawn" and I hated not being able to cut the grass (not that I did the cutting, you understand!!).

Reader Wil said...

The weeping cherry is gorgeous! Mine is now in bloom as well! It's all so beautiful!Have a sunny weekend! The sun is here shining and my solar panels are working hard!

Woman in a Window said...

HA! I stopped at the people to eat, as well. I thought it was just a Weaver speak.

Yes, we do the same here with lilacs, wait and touch, smell too early, fall into and then right off the back of their short life. I guess that is one reason why they are so special.

Lovely photos.

jinksy said...

People to eat? How do you cook them? xxx

Jo said...

Our daffs are naturalised in the grass too, and they are an absolute pain until they can be mown.
I'd chop them off earlier if I could, but the OH grew them commercially before he retired so I'm not allowed anywhere near them.

Leenie said...

Your blog always tells me what to expect next. Our daffodils are just coming into their own...despite sporadic snow and downpour. My bridal wreath spirea was missed by the backhoe so it should bloom wonderfully this year. Yours looks like it is just on the edge of greatness.

Teresa said...

My eyes widened when I saw you were having people to eat! :-)

I have a Bridal Wreath in my garden too... and like yours, it is about to bloom. I'm surprised they're on the same schedule, given the differences in climate of our respective locales.

About the roundhouse in Cornwall on my blog... yes, it is there. I love the unusual shape and the thatched roof.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

You must deadhead daffodils? Well, huh! I've just allowed mine to go here and they're spreading rather well. Guess I should read up on them (thought I had when I first planted them…though apparently not) and do it right. I have lots of daffodils blooming at the moment—grass getting long, too (gotta buy that new mower!) lots of muscari, a small handful of yellow tulips, and a few other early things—but my spirea is not yet ready to bloom.

You're flowers look very nice.

Leslie said...

Thanks, for sharing you flowers, they are lovely.
The first picture of the garden on your blog has a man standing on the far bank looking at the water. It always reminds me of my Grandad.
hugs~~~Leslie

Heather said...

You are so right about daffodils, but a bit of decaying greenery is a small price to pay for such a welcome sight. Maybe a small garden is an advantage as everything is planted cheek by jowl with it's neighbour and the untidy leaves are soon hidden. Your spirea and cherry blossom are a joy and I'm looking forward to the tulips. Have a lovely evening - I didn't have you down as a cannibal, you'll be pleased to know!!

UKBob said...

I am same as everyone else when it comes to whats left over from the bulb floweing. I personally plant them in grass where it doesn't matter if the grass gets long, I think its actually good to plant them along with wild flowers as these don't want to be cut down until after the daffs have died and as they grow they hide the dying daffs. They aren't to bad if planted in borders either as the foliage from the plants hide the dying daffs but in borders you need to know where they are for when the foliage has died otherwise you end up sticking the fork through them. Its a good idea to take a photo of any bulbs you have when they're in flower that way you can refer back to the pictures and get an idea where the bulbs are in the garden because you might think you have a good memory but come the summer or next planting time and you probably won't have a clue. Bob

Kayla coo said...

Your views are so beautiful,so much inspiration.x

willow said...

Beautiful bloom snaps. And I'm glad you clarified that bit about eating people! ;^)

Hildred and Charles said...

I do enjoy your preview of what's coming next in the garden - picked a nice big bunch of daffs this morning to take to a sick friend.

I have heard it is recommended not to stick forks into people you might be baking when you are testing for tenderness...just squeeze gently!

Janice Thomson said...

Over here Weaver we tie the leaves in a knot as they should never be cut back til fully dead - this is how the new bulb gets its nourishment and the old bulb stores up nutrients for the next year.

Raph G. Neckmann said...

I've just been chuckling as I made a cup of tea!

Our giraffodils look untidy too, but other things draw the eye to their splendour.

Cloudia said...

We are lucky that you took the time on this busy day to generously share this bounty of beauty with us!! aloha-

Arija said...

Thank goodness for your post script, you had me quite worried!
I looked at your photos and at the first glimpse of the Spirea my head was filled with song....'the mist of may is in the meadow, and all the clouds are standing still'...it just looked so like a May bush in the meadow.

acornmoon said...

Your garden must be a picture ate the moment.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for the comments. We are a fickle lot aren't we? We wait eagerly for the daffodils (or in Raph's case giraffodils) to come, we go into raptures at them, we write poems about them - they die and we complain about the mess they leave behind. UK Bob knows what he is talking about where daffodils are concerned, so his adice is worth taking.
If you fancy eating people do be careful and follow the advice of Hildred and Charles - gently squeeze rather than sticking a fork in! Cherry blossom well out today - happy gardening!

BT said...

It's funny about daffodils. Now they are 'almost over' and 'fading daffodils'. You are so right in what you say. Love the cherry and spirea, we used to call it the 'foam of May'. Enjoy your guests!