Monday, 4 July 2022

A Resident.

 I have a resident blackbird in my garden.   Well perhaps it is Mr and Mrs Blackbird - but if so then Mrs is busy (or bored) sitting on a second clutch while Mr wanders between the foliage looking for the odd worm or other tasty morsel.   But should another feathered worm eater dare to set foot...... At this point he shoots out from between the foliage at full speed and chases off the intruder in no uncertain terms.   They really are quite agressive birds given half a chance.

Book Group this morning - only three of us able to make it but it was an interesting and enjoyable morning neverthless. Our book was 'The Nickel Boys' by Colson Whitehead.   Not an easy read - quite a painful book to read but plenty to talk about.

It is a nice sunny day here but very windy, far too windy for  Priscilla and I to venture out this afternoon.   I am looking out on the garden and  can see that there are Gallardias desperate for dead heding and many of them within my reach so I shall venture out with the secateurs  right now.See you tomorrow. 

19 comments:

Tasker Dunham said...

Our residents do like our raspberries, but there are enough to go round this year and it's amusing when Mr. Blackbird flies off with a big red berry in his beak.

Latane Barton said...

Enjoyed your post this morning. Those dang blackbirds... they can be so mean. I like it that you have a book group. I haven't read that book and probably won't. (sorry). I do love to read and do so every day! Take care and have a great week.

Debby said...

Weaver, it amazes me the scope of subjects your reading club does. Jim Crowe is a monstrous stain on our history, yet very few are willing to acknowledge it. The death of Emmett Till is in the news (in a minor way) once again. An arrest warrent for Carolyn Bryant Donham was found, but had never been served. She was the woman whose lie led to the horrible death of a boy.

Rachel Phillips said...

I thought you were reading the Canterbury Tales. Oh well. I think your book sounds an awful read to have to discuss; I am currently reading The Traitor King, the frightening story of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor in the 1930s. I see such similarities in their behaviour to that of Prince Harrry and his bride it sends shivers down my spine. I think they must have read the book and are modelling their behavious on it. I recommend it as a read for your book club if you are looking for more non-fiction. The blackbirds here are always noisy and busy but one sees the males not the females mostly. I have no idea what the females are doing.

Tom Stephenson said...

Very energetic birds.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Tasker -a tempter for Mrs B one assumes.

Barbara Anne said...

In our 7+ acres, we have both blackbirds and crows with a few hawks thrown in for extra noise! Every so often a huge cloud of grackles swarms going yard to yard down the street. For size, we also get turkey vultures and they used to scare the cats so we'd barely get the door open for them to barrel indoors to safety.
It's 31*C here and the humidity is high, so there is no chance of outdoor work, besides it's the 4th of July and that means barbecue and all of the trimmings!

Hugs!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Barbara Anne We don't have grackles here in the UK but the first time we encountered them in the US was when thousands of them roosted for the night in the trees which surrounded our hotel - the noise they made was incredible,

Heather said...

I loved hearing a blackbird singing on a spring evening, perched on our roof. My father loved them too, so they always reminded me of him. I daresay most birds need a tough streak when there is food to be found for mates and chicks.
Your book club tackles some very difficult 'reads'. I find them hard to cope with.

thelma said...

I remember when the blackbirds would strip the redcurrants, running around, not even flying away from this succulent bounty. when I approached One of the things I miss from the cottage are the birds. The coming of the mistle thrush and the two starlings who always nested under the pub roof.

Brenda said...

A surprising choice for readers in the UK
Painful is correct …
His Underground Railroad famous too…
Glad you choose such a variety of books. Love your blog.

Anonymous said...

Your comment here Weave, about thousands of birds roosting and the incredible noise reminds me of our galahs here. They can often strip gum trees of their foliage and do a lot of damage en masse and the noise is raucous..so much so that I hoped they were not being shot at in the park as they all flew away in unison. On investigation in was a neighbour cracking a stock whip to clear them! - Pam, Aust.

Susan said...

Nesting birds are very territorial and it is lovely to see them feed their young. I enjoy watching the bird life and find it interesting as they rear their young then suddenly all disappear. You seem to enjoy the friendly discussion at the book club gathering. To keep flowers blooming, deadheading is important. Good job that you are keeping up with the deadheading.

Cro Magnon said...

They are not the most beautiful birds, but the Blackbird's song is amongst the best anywhere.

Librarian said...

Hearing the blackbird's beautiful song for the first time each year is always a personal highlight for me. They often wake me up in the spring, and it is one of the nicest ways to wake up, isn't it.
There are many around O.K.'s cottage, and one in particular likes to sit on top of the roof while we have our evening meal on the balcony, giving our meal a sweet musical background.
Not sure I ever heard of Nickel Boys but it sounds bad.
Like Rachel, I thought you were reading the Canterbury Tales.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

The song of blackbirds is more or less constant throughout the summer months in the hedgerow just outside my front door. I know they raised a couple of youngsters last year but haven't seen any so far this year.

Melinda from Ontario said...

I read The Nickle Boys as well. I had the same conclusion...a painful read. We also read this book for book club. Not surprisingly, our discussion about the book was short lived and we were soon on to different topics.

Ellen D. said...

I read The Nickel Boys and, yes, it is very sad - the saddest part of all is that it is based on a true place - the Dozier School For Boys in Florida, USA.
The book is well-written and it is important for us to face these ugly events of our history here in the USA. It is depressing and tragic, but it can't be forgotten.
I'm am glad your group read it.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks everyone for your comments. Yes I thought we were reading that but because several members are away we are leaving that until later Rachel.