Friday, 7 January 2022

Weather.

 By bedtime last evening the snow had more or less all gone and the weather man said there would not be a frost here last night it would stay 'just above freezing' - 'ah Priscilla and I might just get out for a stroll in the morning'.   I unlocked and opened the front door this morning to a heavy snowstorm and an inch or so of lying snow.   So going out can be consigned to the filing cabinet again for the time being.   Now the sun is blazing down, the snow is dripping off the roof and it is going again.I wonder if everyone in the world has the weather as the main topic of conversation.   I don't suppose they do.   I was just looking at my favourite photo of the farmer which I have in a frame in my sitting room.   I took it myself and we were in the Lofoten Islands and it was around Midsummer Day when it hardly gets dark at all.  And where, of course, it gets jolly cold in Winter.   I don't suppose they ever discuss if they will have snow or do they.   I also once  read how many words the Inuit have for snow - can't remember how ma ny it was but it was a lot.

And of course many places in the Tropics never need to know what the weather is going to be like (I think that would be rather boring don't you - at least it is something to discuss(and believe me don't I know it having been married to a farmer)What was right for one job was often totally wrong for another - apart of course from silage, haymaking and harvesting when my farmer could often be seen in the middle of the night, having been to the bathroom, peering out of the window to get the low down on the weather conditions.

This is another of those days when my laptop and I are not the best of friends.   Having got almost to the end I lost the lot and had to start again.   Then the doorbell went.   By the time I got there with my indoor walker the caller had gone round to the back and I knew then that it was my little new year present to myself from Amazon.   Their drivers are very pleasant and helpful but they do expect you to be hovering just inside the door ready to open it.  However the driver kindly went round the back and brought my box round to me .   After reading Cro's post about making hummus I remembered how I used to make my own until my blender got broken in the move here.   So I bought myself a nice little new one - just the right size for me.   Then of course I had to unpack and assemble it.   Took me ages and I still can't get the lid to fit so I shall have to wait until friends S and T come - either one of them will fit it in a flash and give me instructions.   I can't make any hummus until my chick peas and lemon juice come on my Tesco order on Tuesday so I hope they will call in before then.

Time for Antiques Road Trip shortly.  I enjoy it for the countryside, for the personalities and the lovely stuff in the shops.   Sometimes they do seem to buy the daftest things (two very ordinary dining chairs last evening which one of the contestants bought for what I thought  was the silliest amount and which sold for next to nothing thus losing her money she could ill afford to lose)

Just about dark, big black clouds looming.   See you in the morning.

34 comments:

Sue in Suffolk said...

I like weather, life would be dull without it!

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Most of the early work on meteorology was done by British and Scandinavian scientists; other places just don't have enough weather to study!

Rachel Phillips said...

I will write down on a card and send it to you what to do when you lose a post whilst typing and then perhaps you can stick it somewhere near or on your laptop.

JayCee said...

We have lots of weather here! Plenty to talk about.

Ellen D. said...

The sun is shining brightly but it is bitterly cold so no walk outside for me today. We do talk about the weather a lot - you are right about that, Pat!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Rachel I think you did this once before and I have some instructions - sometimes they work, sometimes they dont. But thank you - I appreciate that.
Interesting comment John.
Love these five comments.

Carol Caldwell said...

I save my posts every few paragraphs so that if anything happens I only need to repeat a small bit. I don't know if your blog works like that. Mine is on wordpress.

Moira said...

I normally live in a subtropical climate where you tell the weather by the Callander. My daughter when she first lived In Scotland never thought of checking the weather forecasts, and was caught out many a time. In Africa it. will rain very heavy from about three in summer with electrical storms, overnight the electrical storms will rage but by four in the morning they will have past and the day will begin. If you live at the coast it will rain heavy during the summer when the rivers will flood and the roads will flow like a river, but that just fill fills the water tanks when the municipal water if not reliable.

Rachel Phillips said...

I have mentioned it to you a couple of times on the blog but I don't recall ever sending you anything about retrieval of lost text. I have made a sketch and will pop it in the post tomorrow.

Susan said...

I am a farmer's daughter so know all about the importance of weather. When the weather forecast came on the radio, which often seemed to be at mealtimes, my siblings and I knew to be as quiet as mice. If anything the weather has become more interesting although not in a good way. In our part of the world in 2021 we have had the heat dome, forest fires with a whole town consumed by one, floods and now the coldest winter on record. it is very unsettling. I hope our politicians really have got the message and it is not more lip service.

Susan said...

I recently came across the story of James Martin Stagg who was the Scottish meteorologist relied on for setting the date for D Day. Weather conditions could have changed the course of history.

Anonymous said...

I can assure you that people in other parts of the world do discuss the weather :) Although we don't have snow here in the tropics, we have the wet season, thunderstorms, heat waves, tropical lows and cyclones, wet winters and dry season. In my experience here in the tropics, exchanging an observation of the weather is a common ice-breaker when people meet.

Anonymous said...

Oh, I should add that our farmers here in the tropics also have to worry about drought conditions and sometimes the storms on the higher tablelands may include hail.

Bonnie said...

This time of the year the weather seems to always be a topic here. We had very mild weather until the first of the year and have been in the deep freeze since then! I even changed my shopping day because I didn't want to go out in single-digit (F) temperatures but it has yet to get much warmer so I will bundle up and go.

I hope you enjoy your new blender. Hummus is a good protein snack that I love to have with fresh, raw veggies.
Stay warm and dry!

Anonymous said...

You mentioned enjoying the Antiques Road Show for the personalities and the countryside. As much as religious hymns are not my thing, I watch your Hymns of Praise for exactly the same reason.The tour of a lovely English town I may not be familiar and then the singing... Who is hoping to be noticed ,ennunciating ecstatically, one eye on the camera, and who is prepared to be humble in the background. I laugh when there's someone wearing the biggest hat they could find. The Vicar of Dibley did a wonderful take on it.- Pam, Aust.

Susan said...

I like our 4 seasons and look forward to the change. Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall all have very distinct qualities. We had our first big snowfall today with approximately 7-9 inches, depending where you are standing. The dog and I have been outside enjoying the fluffy snow. It is a real Winter wonderland of white covering the ground and all the trees and shrubs.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks Rachel. And thank you, as usual to you all for your interesting comments, helpful hints and bits of information. You all help keep my spirits up when Priscilla and I can' get out.

The Furry Gnome said...

We got 8" of snow last night.

Red said...

Snow! I know one Eskimo word for snow apooti. Eskimos used that word with me as it was the only word for snow I knew.

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sparklingmerlot said...

My elderly aunt lives in far north Queensland. Very tropical and she talks about the weather all the time. Hot and dry. Hot and wet. Cold (anything less than 30*C!).

Cro Magnon said...

You've reminded me of a cartoon with two 'Inuit' saying 'I believe in England they have over 300 words for Covid'.

Rachel Phillips said...

Farming is ruled by the weather and is what results in make or break in the farming year. For instance last year arable farmers in the east of England experienced one of the worst cereal harvests in years because of the wet Autumn and Spring preceding. Weather and the farmer is no laughing matter.

A Smaller Life said...

Our little flurry of snow was soon washed away by torrential rain yesterday. Yes we do talk a lot about the weather here in the UK don't we, but then we have such a lot of it, and it's so varied. 😃

Rachel Phillips said...

Eskimos are quite happy go be called Eskimos and in fact use it themselves. Why all this pc rubbish about inuits? I note that Red called them Eskimos and he lived there I believe.

Librarian said...

Rest assured that people in Germany and Italy talk about the weather as much as anyone. It matters to most of us, no matter whether our work and livelihood depend on it or not.

I would really like to know what happened to your carer, you have not mentioned her for quite some time now.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Librarian - My carer is still coming every morning for an hour - she is a treasure and also cleans through the bungalow for me once a month - I could not manage without her.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Rachel - I have cards which I bought which indicate they are designed by Inuit and I also have two wonderful watercolours on my hall wall - both are done by Inuit and are marked so - so I always call them Inuit. I have been to the area several timesthey are delightful and very welcoming people. Everything there is labelled Inuit - so I aways call them that. Perhaps it is an eskimo word for eskimo I don't know. I only know that touring the area it is the word they use for themselves on all the tours I have been on.

Rachel Phillips said...

Ah, I see. Good enough reason. I guess the tours would be pc but I accept your explanation. Thank you.

The Feminine Energy said...

Yep... the weather-folks seldom seem to get the forecast correct. If I had been in error so many times, at my job years ago, I would have been fired. I wonder how it is that the weather-folks all keep their jobs without reprisal?! Keep warm... and safe, Weaver. ~Andrea xoxoxo

The Weaver of Grass said...

Rachel on visits I was always apprehensive about speaking of them as eskimo in case inuit was the 'in' word = I thought they might look upon eskimo as insulting. Shall ask Red

The Weaver of Grass said...

As usual really interesting comments - do read through them all - your views are fascinating.

Simon Douglas Thompson said...

We've had some rather desultory snow here!

thelma said...

Rain, rain, rain, rain. Could go on forever;)