Monday, 28 January 2019

The Window

On the main road, not all that far from the Grove where I now live, there is a bungalow.   When I first came to live here thirty years ago there was always an old lady sitting in the window for most of the day.    I found out that she was housebound and had carers call in to help her family to look after her but that she refused to go into care, preferring to stay at home.

It struck me today that if/when I reach that stage there are worse things than staying at home and sitting in the window all day, waiting for one's carers or one's meals to arrive.   It has been a lovely, although cold day here with unbroken sunshine.   I sat looking out of the window after my lunch of home made leek and potato soup with home made croutons and there was so much to see.   The sky was full of aircraft trails - mostly going (or coming from) South West.   And there were plenty of people passing walking their dogs on a lunch-time walk, several of whom waved. Then I noticed that on the horizon, on East Witton Fell, they were burning the heather in controlled burning on the grouse moors.   They don't have all that much longer to do it before the grouse start breeding and they have to stop the practice.   Clouds of brownish smoke rose into the clear atmosphere.   Later in the afternoon it disappeared.

One has to be realistic at my age so I have had the kind of day when things like this did certainly go through my mind - not in a 'sad' way but - as I say - one has to think about the future.   Maybe I shall just pop off one night in my sleep - the best of all possible ways - but wouldn't we all like to meet our end like that?   Don't send me answers on a postcard to that last question - the poor postman in Trelawnyd must be wearing out shoe leather = don't want our postman doing the same. 

13 comments:

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

There used to be lots of old people who stood at their garden gates watching the world go by, you don't see that so much any more, probably all indoors watching TV.

Gwil W said...

Yesterday I went to see the ballet Copellia - The Girl With the Enamel Eyes. She was very beautiful and sat in the window all day every day. Of course, she wasn't really what she appeared to be. Wonderful music by Leo Delibes (1836-91).

the veg artist said...

A great-aunt of mine lived like that for the best part of 40 years (she reached 100). There were people in and out of the house all day, someone to help her up, get her breakfast then do some housework, someone else would bring a meal from her own kitchen, and some children, sons of one of her 'carers', would call in whenever they walked down into town, to see if she wanted anything. Saturday afternoon was my slot - an hour or so spent sitting with her (she was interesting, but as an ex-teacher of long-ago standards she would make me sit up straight, enunciate, and tell her what I had learnt that week). Then I would go off to do some shopping for her. She always gave me 'pocket money' for running errands, though.
For much of this time she did not have a TV, just a radio, and was very informed. In her later years, someone did arrange a TV for her, and she fell in love with watching snooker of all things. She had been a war widow - and I mean the first World War! In all, she must have been a widow for at least 70 years.
I often think how she would have loved the internet!

Bonnie said...

I agree with you. I too think there could be worse things than sitting in a window watching the world go by. I've always been able to stare out a window for ages particularly if there are trees with squirrels and birds. I could watch nature all day along with changes in weather.

As far as postmen go, I almost feel like we should send a gift to John's Trelawnyd mail carrier!

justjill said...

So long as I can end my days at home.... I already have a carer who does my personal care as the DP does everything else. My Doctors know I wish to remain at home and have said they will respect that. As you say you have to think ahead. Then once sorted get on with it.x

Chris said...

I love watching out the window and I can still get out and about, but first thing I watch the one mum and three little ones walking to school. And then just the mum and the littlest one in the push chair coming back. Brings back happy memories of myself walking my children to school.

Heather said...

I can remember seeing an old lady (probably about the age I am now!) looking out of her window as I passed by with my then baby daughter. I pointed out the old lady to her and we both waved and were delighted to see the old lady smile at us and wave back.
I think it is most people's wish to end their days at home, possibly in their sleep, and I hope that I'll make the most of each day until that time comes.
I could never see much sky from my living room chair until I moved into my flat - there were too many trees and roofs in the way. Now I can watch wonderful clouds, birds and aircraft trails to my heart's content.

Leilani Schuck Weatherington said...

Stay at home as long as you can. I don't think you'll get homemade leek and potato soup if you go into a long-term care facility.

Joanne Noragon said...

What a lovely thought, Pat. I already can sit and gaze half a day away.

Cro Magnon said...

I think we all echo your desires. I've seen the alternative, and it's no fun.

Aahana said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
thelma said...

Watching the world go by a delightful thought as we get older. Sometimes there are sad sights but it is part of the human existence. Antony Gormley on 'How Art Began' BBCiplayer makes you reflect as well. ;)

Jennyff said...

I have never had a day in hospital during my 70 years so the thought of ending my life there or in some care home is dreadful. I have a fear of living too long, I shall know when I've had enough meantime I enjoy what I have.