Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Exciting or what?

There is so much to grumble about going on at the moment isn't there?   But I try not to let myself do any moaning (either in my head or out loud).  Then this morning a wonderful piece of news which fired my enthusiasm - that they have discovered a 2,500 year old vessel (a 75ft merchant vessel) lying more or less intact 2 kilometres down in the Black Sea. 

It lies fifty miles off the coast of what is now Bulgaria which shows just how far these early traders ventured from the coast on their travels up and down.   And to think it was sailing when Aristotle was alive and that it lies there on the sea bed, more or less intact considering its age.

The Siren Vase in the British Museum shows Odysseus strapped to the mast of his ship to avoid the temptation of the Siren voices.   The boat on the vase and the boat on the sea bed have matching masts.   As Jon Adams, Professor of Archaeology and chief scientist of the team which found the wreck says - no-one knew how accurate the depiction of the boat was on the Siren Vase:  now the one on the sea bed shows just how familiar the artist who depicted the ship was with the shipping of the day. 

Interestingly the reason the ship is so well  preserved is that below 490 feet the Black Sea is devoid of oxygen so that there are no marine organisms to consume the wood.

I can only begin to imagine the excitement of such a find but it has certainly taken my mind off all the turmoil going on in the world at the present time - so let's celebrate such a wonderful discovery.

26 comments:

Derek Faulkner said...

Wow, that is exciting Pat, if only they could raise it, it would make the Mary Rose look almost modern.
The only news I get despondent about is bad local news, I leave more distant stuff to those who get some kind of pleasure from blogging about such stuff.

Sue in Suffolk said...

I saw that on the news and thought I bet the archaeologists were excited about that find. Although they'll never be able to lift it because it would just disintegrate in the air but I guess they'll be able to make models that they know are correct.

galant said...

This is such an uplifting post, Pat, thank you for that. I have moaning minnies with a passion. We all have things we can moan about from time to time, but I find that empty vessels (no pun on our post, by the way!) make the most noise! Again, thank you so much, your enthusiasm for this is infectious!
Margaret P
www.margaretpowling.com

justjill said...

That is amazing. Hope we get to see photos.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Hadn't heard about that, Pat, but I shall be looking into it you may depend. I remember that when I read about the Flag Fen site, near Peterborough, that things were found that originated across Europe and beyond.

Gwil W said...

I saw a photo in this morning's paper. A spokesman said they are going to leave it lying there at the bottom of the sea.

Catriona said...

Yes, let’s. What an informative and joyful post to read on this chilly day.

Bonnie said...

I love to hear about ancient finds such as that! It is fun to think what life must have been like at the time the ship was in use.

Heather said...

This is fascinating. Will anyone dare to bring it to the surface? It would be wonderful to be able to see such an ancient and well preserved ship, but a very hazardous project fraught with problems, not to mention very expensive.

Rachel Phillips said...

I am so pleased to read what Gwil said, that they are going to leave it where it is. My first reaction when I read your post was that it was probably the worst thing that could happen to it, that it had been found. I find the history of fascinating though.

Tom Stephenson said...

Yes, that is really exciting. Apparently the mast is still up and the rudder is still there. Wonderful.

Simon Douglas Thompson said...

I was fascinated to read this too, and thought of my old lecturer and Black Sea expert Dave Braund who would be excited too.

Anonymous said...

I love ancient things and as that wreckage is so deep, I bet they couldn't bring it up. They once found a shipwreck off of the Texas coast and literally built a building around it and pumped the water out so they could reclaim it. I don't remember now who or what kind of ship it was, but probably a pirate ship.

Bovey Belle said...

A thrilling discovery - anaerobic conditions protect some amazing finds. That's a LONG way down though.

jinxxxygirl said...

Very interesting Pat. I love hearing about stuff like that.. Theres not much i can do about stuff happening around the world... far flung or close at hand.. All i can control is whats right in my own back yard and most times thats enough.. my grass needs a last mowing.. lol Great post! Hugs! deb

Mummy and Me said...

Wow, that's amazing. It's good when a story like that comes out once in a while. Such ancient times seem almost mythical to me, tied up with stories of gods and other-worldly creatures - wonderful to find a relic like that, something so tangible, from such a time. It almost transports you back in time just thinking about it!

Susan Heather said...

Amazing - hadn't heard about it but suppose it will be on our evening news. Don't tend to listen to the news during the day.

angryparsnip said...

Read this also. How fabulous !
I love History and of course Geography.

cheers, parsnip and badger

Ruth said...

Thank you dear Pat for something worthwhile to think about. With all the new technology, they'll probably be able to re-create it. I just can't imagine the excitement of the first to see it! Ancient history is so fascinating. Things like this prove that it isn't merely fairy tales. This old earth is full of hidden surprises.

Cro Magnon said...

I saw the pictures, and was as captivated as you!

Librarian said...

Your blog is the first place I am reading about this - thank you! It is exactly my kind of thing, I am fascinated with history and love a good "mystery"!

Sue said...

Well said Pat, it's great to have news of something that is wonderful.

thelma said...

A wonderful piece of news, maybe they will be able to build a replica. I love the old Viking ships with roaring dragons mastering the seas. We forget of course that the water was the way people got around. Our 'dark age' monks went from one end of Britain to the other by sea. And maybe, just maybe, the Bluestones of Stonehenge were transported by sea from Wales...

galant said...

PS I meant to say "I hate moaning minnies ..." not "have"!
Margaret P

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