Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Poetry

It was our Poetry Group afternoon - one of my favourite afternoons of the month.   It is just so peaceful - around ten of us meeting, reading out our favourite choices for the day and often just a bit of discussion afterwards.   Today was just a bit sad as one of our band is leaving and going to live in Brighton - we shall be so sorry to say goodbye to her.

Friend S took Tess for a lovely long walk at the same time so Tess has come back hungry and tired out and I don't have to feel guilty at leaving her all afternoon.

Now, at precisely ten minutes to seven, it is almost dark outside and I have drawn the curtains against the night. 

Now that I know moving date is getting nearer I am, if it is possible, more restless and worked up about it all than I was.   I am making lists and will shortly need to see the lady with whom I am swopping houses to iron out a few queries.   For example, as friend W said today, I have no idea how to work the gas central heating boiler or the electric oven.  Apparently the lady has brochures of instructions for both but has packed them.   So, as W suggests, I need to write the instructions out in my own words (of no more than two syllables!)

I shall now go and sit down and have a peaceful evening I hope.   Sleep well.   See you tomorrow.

22 comments:

Penhill said...

I sympathise,but my daughter has just phoned from her university house miles away and expected me to know why her central heating isn't working!

Rachel Phillips said...

I did exactly the same when I bought this house. I had an exercise book and listed questions to ask the seller and then met him face to face and went through everything with him going through each room. I still have the book with pencil drawings and things marked up like phone sockets, fuse box and fuses, stop cock, and any idiosyncrasies the house may have that I asked him about and wrote down for myself in single syllables. I think he thought I was slightly mad but I needed this information to feel happy about buying it so didn't care what he thought, after all he was pleased to have a buyer.

Derek Faulkner said...

One of the important issues is finding out where the stopcock is and is it easily accessible in an emergency. Often, you find out too late that it's behind some fitted units or out of reach somewhere else. In the event of a water leak indoors you need to be able to get to that immediately.

Rosie said...

If no instruction booklets forthcoming dont worry unduly my experience has been that I have been able to download the booklets on the internet for free.

justjill said...

I agree get as much info down you can understand about anything that could go wrong. We lived here for some years before we realised there was a separate fuse thing for the shedudio/summerhouse. The stop cock is hidden in a cupboard in the dining room nowhere near any water supply - we thought.

Joanne Noragon said...

We had every manual/instruction book for everything we ever owned. It took us a day to sort out what to leave for the new owner.

Chris said...

Not really relevant but I was in my present house for five years before I discovered there was a pocket door between the kitchen and the entrance hall! Also the outside water tap was in the basement ceiling behind an air vent. Go figure!

angryparsnip said...

Yes, write everything down in your own language. Big help !

cheers, parsnip

Virginia said...

YIKES!!! Yes, you do need instructions that you understand, but I would also need to have come back a little later and tried to do it "All By Myself"... and see if I really understood what I had to do. I'm a complete twit with new appliances.

When we moved here, I bought an exercise book and a large plastic envelope and all instruction manuals etc, and receipts (with guarantees especially) go in there. Until I did that we would be able to find the instruction books for the alliances from the 1980s, but not for the current ones!!!

Of course you're getting anxious - there is such a lot to think about, but it "will be all right on the day", coz we're all backing you Weaver!!

Mac n' Janet said...

We always leave a binder of manual s for all the appliances and systems in the house. But a walk through of how to use everything would definitely be helpful.

Cro Magnon said...

When my people sold one particular house, the new owners asked if the summer house still 'swivvled'. My mother didn't know what they were talking about, and they explained that it was set on a circular metal base that moved to face the sun. My parents had lived there for about 15 years and had no idea. They tried to turn it, and it worked perfectly!

Librarian said...

I so like the idea of your poetry afternoons! Sorry to hear one of your group is leaving. How did you originally get started? Did you meet at a poetry reading, or were just "normal" friends and acquaintances who one day discovered they all like poetry?

thelma said...

Don't panic, there is always an expert plumber, electrician and general handyman out there. Tess seems to be getting spoilt, isn't that good? All those 'how to use' pamphlets are often written in double dutch or at least a dozen languages, and tiny, tiny writing.

Alphie Soup said...

Good idea, getting the instructions down in 'your' language.

Alphie

The Weaver of Grass said...

Cro - your story about the swivel summer house brought back lovely memories of Sunday mornings when I was a child. My father and I would walk up to see a friend of his and they had just such a summer house in their garden. I used to love sitting in there and having a glass of lemonade while then men had a glass of beer. I had completely forgotten about it.

liparifam said...

Just moved into another new house at age 55 - the 8th I've actually owned (I've also rented two for brief periods) in 7 different cities since I was 22. Sometimes I wake up in the morning and have to lie in the dark for a minute figuring out where I am, LOL! It always takes quite a while to learn everything about the newest house - but you will get there! I've never heard of a swivel house!

Rachel Phillips said...

Liparifam, a summer house is a small pavilion/open fronted type construction usually in wood in a garden for sitting in to enjoy fine weather in England. They are often on a rotating base so that they can be swivelled round to follow the sun for maximum enjoyment.

Devon said...

Your poetry gatherings sound so enjoyable. I have not moved in 26 years and can only imagine how much time it must take to sift through everything choosing what to keep and what to pass on to charity. You are so close, I am sure once you are in your new home all will soon settle and there will be new conveniences for you.

Heather said...

It does all seem to come at once when moving house, but once you are at your new address you can take things at your own pace. Hope you get the instructions for the 'new' cooker and heating system. Also, I hope you will be able to continue with your poetry afternoons after you have moved.

Amanda said...

I recall my first morning in one of our moves. The landlord had left the microwave and I had no idea how to work it. The thing had more buttons than the Starship Enterprise. Husband had taken the car to work so I couldn't go out, the kitchen was still mostly in boxes, and about all I had in the way of groceries were a few microwave meals in the freezer. It nearly reduced me to tears. Yes, make sure you know how the house works before you take it over!

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

I agree, moving is such a stress, but knowing what I do about you, I can see you adjusting and figuring things out perfectly well. So glad your poetry day is such a pleasure to you.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks - I am taking all your hints and suggestions to heart.