Wednesday, 24 June 2015

Stage Two

First silage is now completed and it is time to prepare the fields for their second silage crop (I spoke about routine yesterday - the routine for the farm is even more rigid and one job follows another just as one season follows another).

My header shows you just how dry and yellow the grass is, although of course it has been cut short and would be yellow anyway.   But the ground beneath is hard as I found on my walk with Tess yesterday.

For a couple of hours after lunch the sun was actually shining and hot!   During this time we had our stroll - I forgot my telephone and had a couple of arguments with stiles which almost caused me a downfall, but next door are building an extension and I could see the builders and hear them shouting to one another, so reasoned I could always yell to them if I fell.

Half way down the first field we met an unusual rabbit - it was a very light sandy colour.   We always get one or two this colour every year.  I wonder if someone in the past has let a tame rabbit go in the fields and it has bred.   Does anyone else in this country come across such a phenomenon?

Coming back through the front walled garden I found that my old rose, Gertrude Jekyll was in full bloom.   I got her scent before I saw her - but isn't she beautiful?

12 comments:

Penny said...

You do look dry, we haven't had a huge amount of rain but it is winter here.

A Heron's View said...

Yesterday the field adjoining us was cut and round baled all in the same day and they had a piece of equipment that picked up four round bales at a time - I was totally amazed !

Linda Metcalf said...

Beautiful rose. I've been enjoying mine for about a month now.

jinxxxygirl said...

I live in the Arkansas in the USA and i have noticed that coloration among the deer population. I grew up in the NJ/PA area around a lot of deer and i don't remember such color differences...Here i see some light brown... dark brown... some almost blonde.....Some light brown with very dark patches on their faces .. around their eyes....strange.. Hugs! deb

Cro Magnon said...

I've seen escapee tame Rabbits out in the countryside... I don't suppose they survive too long, unless they're adopted by a warren. Sounds rather like Watership Down, doesn't it.

Heather said...

It's very dry down here too - the ground is so hard and I am exhausted from trying to dig out weed roots. Glad you didn't have a fall and what a lovely greeting from that beautiful rose to welcome you home.

Maureen @ Josephina Ballerina said...

Seems like uniqued-up on a unique rabbit!
Forgive me.

Frugal in Derbyshire said...

Our paddock is rock hard too. Very little rain and a drying wind.
We have the occasional black rabbit here. Cute to look at, but they still take the veggies down to the ground. A neighbour of mine says that they are god's creatures and should be protected. This is the same woman who buys my veg and eggs off me. She also supports the release of town foxes into the countryside Grrrr. So the rabbits eat my veg, the fox eats the rabbits and the hens, she eats my eggs and veg if there is any left. I'm sure I could torture this into something sensible, but I just want to shake her actually!

Terry and Linda said...

Your rose is stunning. Our alfalfa field is looking the same way. But the fields that have the water on them are starting to green right up. Yours will be lush again in a few weeks, to be able to be cut one more time. As ours will be.

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

Midlife Roadtripper said...

To get a rose that beautiful and have a lovely scent along with it? Have to love that.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Frugal's answer is so interesting - and so typical of many country folk. Wonder if she was once a townie?
Thanks for alling in.

Gwil W said...

I was surprised to see a big reddish coloured rabbit in a red sandstone area. On the Wirral I think it was.