Sunday, 11 January 2015

Traditional Sunday Lunch.

I wonder just how many people cook a traditional Sunday lunch these days.   When I was a child I think most women did the traditional roast for the family.   We had beef, lamb and pork in that order.   On Sunday it would be roast and served after (not with) Yorkshire puddings and gravy, and all the vegetables available in our own garden.   Then there would be a pudding - probably apple pie and custard, or sometimes an egg custard in a pastry case and sprinkled with a thick layer of nutmeg.  The next day we would have the meat cold and the veggies fried,   the day after probably cottage pie with a mashed potato topping.   Housewives were (or always seemed to be) careful and thrifty.
Now that the large majority of women work as well, traditional Sunday lunch may be almost a thing of the past.   We manage to get ours when we feel like it by visiting our local golf club at Catterick Garrison, which is open for non-members and always very busy.   Today the farmer had roast beef and I had roast chicken.  The farmer being a traditionalist, started his meal with vegetable soup; I opted for garlic mushrooms, which were delicious but so filling that I found it hard to do justice to my main course of roast chicken.
Alright - there are no left-overs to use up tomorrow, but I can live with that in return for no work to do preparing the lunch this morning.
It is a bleak, raw, Winter's day - icy wind, dull, sharp sleety showers - nothing to commend it really. Now that we have returned (and feel like absolutely nothing more to eat today) we have to sort out the papers for changing our car for a new one tomorrow.   I am busy sorting out our holiday in early  May, when we intend to visit Aldebrough in Suffolk after a short break in Lincoln (my home town)so I am searching for a nice hotel.   Alright, May is a long time yet, but once it is booked then I can begin to look for places to go and things to do.   The Magna Carta is on display from mid March at Lincoln Cathedral, so we are keen to see that and always stay at the same hotel, just round the corner from the cathedral.

As my sister got into her eighties she always used to say that she could cope with whatever life threw at her, providing that she always had something to look forward to.    As I get to that age I know exactly what she means - so planning ahead and writing dates in the diary is always an enjoyable activity.

16 comments:

Mac n' Janet said...

We love planning ahead gets you through the bad weather months.

Rachel said...

The Brudenell is a nice place to stay in Aldeburgh. I have stayed there and can recommend it.

We have a traditional roast dinner every week although not on a Sunday.

Enjoy your holiday planning.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I cook a Sunday roast for my mother if I'm not working - leg of lamb today - and very tasty it was too even if I say so myself!

Joanne Noragon said...

I love looking forward to the things I've planned to do.

Cro Magnon said...

I do trad' roasts quite often, but always for dinner; never lunch.

I remember Catterick Camp for hard slog, boot polish, and nasty sergeant majors; not for good food.

Twiggy said...

We try to plan a break for later in the year just after Christmas, I agree it's good to have something to look forward to. We always had a Sunday roast when I was a child, Monday was leftover cold meat and bubble and squeak. Had a lovely meal of beef and Yorkshires at my inlaws yesterday, so today I've made a big pot of spag bol, and we'll have half the sauce for dinner after work tomorrow, bliss no cooking or washing up then :)
Twiggy

Heather said...

You get much better results by roasting a large piece of meat but there are only two of us and smaller joints shrink dreadfully. I tend not to cook roasts, though like you we have them out sometimes.
Many years ago we had lovely holidays at Thorpness, and would walk along to Aldeburgh for fresh fish and other local goodies. It's always good to have something to look forward to.

jinxxxygirl said...

Well Weaver we eat out waaaay too much... and that is usually where we get our best food. LOL! I do not like to cook..never have. I cooked out of necessity when the children were little but since they are grown and gone i cook because i must because who can afford to eat out every meal? :) One trick i do to avoid cooking often is that when i do cook i cook alot so i have leftovers to freeze.. Like i will marinate and bake a dozen chicken breasts and after we eat our meal i will take the rest and freeze individually . That way a meal is easy to put on the table. Thaw the chicken in the microwave and microwave a baked potato and put a veggie with it and there you have a fairly healthy meal with little effort..

I will also take a few fish fillets ....usually Talapia and marinate them then make a little foil packet for the fish and add some onion and some rice and a veggie, close it up and throw it in the oven for 20 - 30 minutes and theres supper... Hugs! deb

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

We don't do the traditional Sunday dinner anymore - but it was standard when I was growing up. Just the two of us now on most Sundays and so we usually eat lightly as it is the weekend and I don't want to spend all the time in the kitchen.

In the summer we are more likely to have a family gathering with our daughters and their families on Sunday - usually a barbecue on the deck if the weather is nice.

Maureen @ Josephina Ballerina said...

Hey Pat,
I love to cook and find creative ways with leftovers. Ray got me a nice new pot and pan set for Christmas. I have been using cast iron cookware for years, but my wrists aren't strong enough to lift them safely any more. I have a long, thin frame and really thin wrists. The new pots are red on the outside, non-stick inside. The color really perks up our tiny kitchen.
Happy Week. Expecting an ice storm here after midnight. Oh. Goody.
:) m & jb

Frugal in Derbyshire said...

I cook a roast every Sunday ( for dinner , not lunch ) because the family come every Sunday, so it is worth the effort and nice to do for them. I still try to make more than we (nine of us) can eat so that I can have a nice easy evening meal with leftovers on monday.
It's always nice to have interesting things to put in the diary.

Bovey Belle said...

I know just what your sister means about having something to look forward to - I have always worked on that principle.

We don't have traditional Sunday roast, but I did do a pot roast of beef in my slow cooker yesterday, with veg cooked to perfection and roasties to die for (best I've ever made!) My husband even had 2nds of them, which has never happened before : )

Funny you should mention Lincoln, as I am up to Sheffield to stay with our eldest daughter, and that is where I suggested we went for a day out. A pity their copy of the Magna Carta will still be on its travels when we are there.

Gwil W said...

It's a challenge to walk up that hill in Lincoln but an even bigger one to walk down, which I saw a woman try and do in a pair of high heels, needless to say she came a cropper.

Terry and Linda said...

Boredom is something we don't seem to have, us farm folks, do we.

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com/?s=The+Adventures+of+Fuzzy+and+Boomer&submit=Search
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

Hildred said...

My father went to 8 0'clock communion and then came home and cooked the Sunday roast while the rest of the family went and sang in the choir at 11. Alas, that tradition has gone by the wayside .....

I agree that something to look forward to makes life much more exciting, - I am going to a shower for my new great-grandson on Tuesday evening, - an hour or two amongst all those young mothers should be invigorating! And reminiscent....

mrsnesbitt said...

With the Rayburn being so hot it's a sin not to utilise the heat and have something cooking all of the time. Trouble is when there is only 2 of us we get quite piggy but I LOVE a roast joint - beef is my favourite. I love a nice rich gravy too - I boil onions and leeks until tender then pour the entire contents into the food processor with 4 beef oxos - or more depending on quantity - whisk up and the beautiful thick onion gravy is to die for - healthy too!