Friday, 31 August 2012

Wet, wet, wet.



We get one fine day and then a wet one on the whole, so that the land never has a real chance to dry up. This is quite worrying for farmers as they do need to make second, or even third, crop silage for winter feed. Judging by the way things are going weather-wise, animals may well be brought in early this year (there was ice on our car this morning) and this will mean that unless extra silage is able to be brought in there will be a shortage of winter feed before the end of winter and the price will rocket up.

Gateways in particular are very wet. Why is it always the gateways where it is wettest? But in our fields set aside of silage making, everywhere is wet and any machinery that ventured on to the field would be quickly bogged down.

So let's hope for some fine September weather. We have several ancient horses in the field next to ours. One is a retired racehorse in his twenties (in the photograph) with a naughty habit of chewing the wood off the top of the fence. The other two are mares, one in her twenties and the other well into her teens - both have been brood mares in their younger days. And one has a condition called 'mud fever', which means she has to have her leg dressed and bandaged every day. Amazingly, she gets her head into a bucket of oats and lets the stable girls get on with the bandaging without even looking in their direction.

I love these horses when they come. They are so tame that they come to the fence at a call. The girls say it is because they hope to be fed, but they come every day when I am on my walk and I certainly dare not feed them as I am quite scared of horses. But we have nice conversations.

On an entirely different subject, a friend J came into the Golden Lion when we were all having coffee this morning and told me that she almost always reads my blog. It is always good when somebody tells me they read it (it makes me try a bit harder). She says she is disappointed that I never mention that our little town, Leyburn, has a very thriving Band, in which she plays. So here you are J - a mention of Leyburn Band and if you send me a photograph of them then I will put it on to my blog one day!

13 comments:

MorningAJ said...

They say we're in for a few good days this coming week, so let's hope the farmers have chance to get their silage in.

Carolyn H said...

you had ice this morning? The landscape still looks quite green around your horse friend, too.

Heather said...

I believe we are in for a fine weekend so I hope Yorkshire gets it too. That's a very handsome horse even if he has bad habits. They are lovely creatures and I'd be very brave with a fence between us! Three cheers for Leyburn's Band - they'd love a photo for your blog.

Bovey Belle said...

An interesting post - sorry you have had a virtual frost already - though I have to say it was pretty cold here first thing. I still open the front door wide when I get up and this morning was a do I/don't I? day for that . . . I hate it when I have to shut all the doors and windows for winter.

As for the horses, the one who crib bites (eats the fence) is naughty! It is an equine "vice". If she was a racehorse, that is often where they acquire that habit, due to an acid stomach from the regimes of a racing stable. That the one with mud fever has it even in high summer, says much for our dreadful wet summer this year as it's normally a winter complaint. I'm glad she accepts her dressing and bandaging with good grace.

angryparsnip said...

I can't tell you in person but I read your blog everyday and it is always first in my morning read with coffee !

You have had such a wet summer and our mid-west has had drought... nothing grew and cattle had to be sold off. Our prices will go up for all food this year.

I hope you get a nice dry September.
Love the photos of the horse.

cheers, parsnip

Gwil W said...

I like it that the retired racehorse can live out his pension in relative ease. All too easy to send them to the knacker's yard.

rustyduck said...

Officially the wettest summer for 100 years.

Like you, down here in the South West we've had an incredible amount of rain and no time for the ground to dry out in between.

Whilst we didn't get a frost, already I am back to shutting up the greenhouse at night.

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

I am always taken aback when someone I know tells me they read my blog. I get all shy and pink. Love your elderly horses. They look as though they would be excellent listeners. Praying for clear, sunny skies for you this September. xoxo, p

Golden West said...

We're anxious for rain here - nothing since a smattering in early May and we are parched! I hope you have a dry September with sunny days no no frost for a while!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for visiting. Bovey Belle's comments on that nibbling are interesting aren't they?

Dartford Warbler said...

I do think that horses are motivated by more than food. They will appreciate your quiet company and want to be near you. Lovely that these three are being well cared for in their retirement years.

Blu-I'd-Blonde said...

From Central Kansas in the US: we could use all that rain. I was awakened by raindrops on our bedroom roof and breathed a prayer of thanks to the Creator. I had no more than finished the prayer and the sprinkles stopped. I remember a drought like this in the 1950's. Hopefully, you can send some of your rain our way. Love your pictures.

Sergio Valles said...

thanks for loving nature & animals

Hope to see more posting related to Chandler Landscaping