Friday, 10 August 2012

Grass



What a boring subject I hear you say. We take grass so forgranted don't we? In fact we get annoyed when it grows anywhere we don't want it.

But today I had to have several walks with Tess because the farmer was away to his hay. The above two photographs are the six different varieties of grass I found just walking down one side of the paddock. At one time there used to be a large patch of what I call quaking grass, but this seems to have disappeared now. But really these grasses are so pretty and each stem seems to have thousands of seeds, which is, I suppose, the reason they are so invasive. So I shall enjoy the grass while it lasts because before long it will be dying down and then we shall be facing another Winter. And of course, grass makes hay and that is what we are busy doing at the moment!

14 comments:

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I had a friend one time who knew all the names of the various grasses. I thought I might learn them all one day but I never have.
Thanks for reminding me of the beauty of this humble plant.

Heather said...

I have always thought that grasses are beautiful, except as you say those boring little tufts which persist in growing where we don't want them. They are at their loveliest just before being cut for hay and I remember as a child, lying in my grandmother's field looking through them and seeing them silhouetted against the sky.

Jinksy said...

I was please when I found pendulous sedge growing in between my patio slabs, but it certainly seeds like billy-o now - I have to have an onslaught to pull up baby plants... It took about 3 years for it to get to the point of producing seed heads, though.

Reader Wil said...

I once met a scientist of grasses who had been at a conference about grass all over the world. Grass is interesting and even beautiful in bouquets.
Thanks for your visit.You are right about getting close to complete strangers in difficult situations. Have a great weekend!

Hildred and Charles said...

In the last few years grasses have become very popular in North American gardens, - variations on the wild kinds and some absolutely gorgeous. I seem to have a 'perennial' battle with coutch grass in the garden. Probably what some people call quack grass.....

Bovey Belle said...

I have the Roger Phillips book with photos and names of them all, but still only know 2 or 3 by name! I am steering clear of grass at present as our paddock has regrown after cutting and has fresh seed heads and pollen and is not helping my asthma . . .

cloudia charters said...

On the contrary! I look upon the banana "tree" and never fail to thrill that it is a huge grass.
A comforting and companionable post. Best to you, Tess. and the Farmer



Have a sweet weekend!
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Dartford Warbler said...

There is nothing nicer than breaking open a bale of good hay, in the middle of winter, and finding dried, beautiful summer grass heads. I only know some of the commoner grasses but the ponies seem to have a passion for Timothy grass.

Everything Changes said...

:-)

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

And the fragrance is always sooo nice. To me, the grass always smells like the season.
xoxo
p

Em Parkinson said...

I love them too. he moors are covered in different varieties but I have no idea what they are called. I shall do some research....when I have time!

it's me said...

an appropriate post for a weaver of grass--

grasses are beautiful and essential in the scheme of things--nice idea to lay them out on a white background

ArcticFox said...

not boring at all and certainly not the first time I've seen pictures of grass.... here are some of mine

Loren said...

It's amazing how so many things seem boring until we really look at them, isnt' it?