Tuesday, 3 July 2012

This and that.




First of all, the honeysuckle is out by the pasture gate. The flower is exquisite, the word is one of my favourite words and the scent (if you come up the pasture early in the morning when the dew is still on the plant) meets you long before you get to the gate. The farmer says it has been there as long as he can remember. It does beg the question why does honeysuckle do so badly in my front garden, about fifty yards further down the lane? Still, at least I can enjoy this one.

Next to tell you that yesterday they came to shear the sheep. Not a moment too soon as most of the Swaledale ewes had already lost at least two thirds of their fleece, which lies about field in woolly clumps. Judging by the sultriness of the weather today I should say they are jolly pleased they were shorn yesterday. Wool prices have got a little better but are still too low for the job of shearing them to pay. While they were in for shearing they were all drenched and also had a pedicure. Pedicures are essential for sheep. They so easily get foot problems. If you see a sheep kneeling down to eat then you will know that its feet are sore and it can't bend its head to eat without being in pain from the weight on its front feet.

Lastly, at long last the vegetable garden has started to spring into life. The broad beans and the peas are in flower, the beetroot is looking as though it will live after all, the strawberries are swelling, runner beans are still under glass to protect them from the strong winds we have been having but they are growing apace, and the gooseberries are almost ready so must get the jam sugar ready for making gooseberry jam. I wonder if I could make gooseberry chutney - anyone got any ideas? I shall now go and search the internet for just such a recipe.

Enjoy your day.

15 comments:

angryparsnip said...

I love when you write about what is happening daily on the farm.
I am so envious of your garden. It looks wonderful.

If I lived in the city I could have one but out here in the country I can't have one unless it is in a wire cage.
The small tiny garden my daughter and I put in my side yard is destroyed. The pack rats have invaded and eaten everything even my favorite cactus.
I have put three sets of different lights (pack rats come out at night and don't like the light) that are on all night but they get in anyways.
What started out as such a fun project is not so much fun. I can't keep them out. So the garden gets dismantled this month. No use watering dirt. Bummer.

Do you pick up the wool that is in the fields or do the animals use it for the nests ?

cheers, parsnip

Tanya @ Lovely Greens said...

I adore Honeysuckle! I read somewhere recently that they're easy to propagate and have been thinking of trying it out. Have you done it before yourself?

It's absolutely sodden here and I haven't been out to the allotment in nearly a week. I'm glad to hear that someone else's garden is doing well though :)

Joanne said...

Everything is lovely; honesuckle, sheep and garden. I can't believe the way the garden looks.

Dartford Warbler said...

There are lots of wild honeysuckle plants in the hedgerows here. I love the scent on a warm summer`s night but so far we have had cold, wet summer`s nights for weeks!

I hope the shorn sheep huddle together to keep warm tonight if the rain returns.

Your garden looks so lush and green after the rain.

Dartford Warbler said...

There are lots of wild honeysuckle plants in the hedgerows here. I love the scent on a warm summer`s night but so far we have had cold, wet summer`s nights for weeks!

I hope the shorn sheep huddle together to keep warm tonight if the rain returns.

Your garden looks so lush and green after the rain.

Heather said...

I'm sure the sheep will feel like skipping about after losing their wool and having a pedicure.
It sounds as if summer has arrived in Yorkshire even if the weather disagrees. Your veg plot looks wonderful. My broad beans have been disappointing - the wind bashed them about so but we had a few pickings. I'm amazed at the way the sweet peas and honeysuckle have stood up to the awful conditions. Even though my tomatoes are in the greenhouse I can't help thinking I might be making vast quantities of green tomato chutney this year!

Angie said...

Really enjoyed the post ...never knew that about sheeps feet ...good luck with the chutney ...I think a spicey one would work well with the sweetnesss.

Eryl said...

Your vegetable garden looks fantastic, and I love honeysuckle. Will pay more attention to the sheep around here with regards their feet.

Reader Wil said...

From Australia I am answering all the comments. What you told about thge sheep and the need of pedicures is interesting. I always enjoy reading about your life on the farm.
Thank you so much for your thoughtful comment!

Dave King said...

I do so agree with you about the honeysuckle - word and smell - although ours is almost over now. Always a sad moment for me.

Gerry Snape said...

i love it that you love that word! another of mine is loveinamist...it says it all I think and of course the beauty of these two innocent flowers goes without saying!

The Weaver of Grass said...

If anyone in the UK is interested in spinning, I would be happy to collect all those bits of wool out of the field and post them on. Sometimes I wish I had a spinning wheel.

In answer to Tanya - I have struck honeysuckle cuttings in the past but have never tried with this huge 'wild' one - I might try now you have suggested it.

Thanks for the comments.

Midlife Jobhunter said...

I'm one of the few I know who love gooseberry jam. We used to steal the berries from a woman's yard when I was real young. I think it helped develop my taste for tart rather than sweet.

Your garden is beautiful. Truly.

Golden West said...

What a fine vegetable garden you have growing there, Pat!

ArcticFox said...

I've got allotment envy!

this looks interesting