Friday, 13 July 2012

The coming of Autumn.




Sorry to be such a Jonah when we have had no Summer to speak of, but up here at a height above sea level I have always said that our Autumn begins with August, regardless of whether we have had any Summer of not.

Walking out today with Tess and the farmer (I have had my eyes tested today and the drops I had put in to dilate my pupils made my vision so blurred that I dare not walk on my own) I noticed various signs which tell me that Autumn is on its way.

The wild roses are already fading and in the strong breeze the petals are blowing along the sides of the lane; the meadowsweet, with its heady, almondy smell is in full bloom; there are already berries on the honeysuckle as well as flowers. Last but not least, the wild blackberries are in full flower.

So far the rain has held off, although it is now very cloudy and doesn't look too promising. Sadly, when the farmer shook up the crop this morning he found that he had run over and killed a hen pheasant sitting on a nest of eggs. Always sad when this happens.

Speaking of eggs, we gave a clutch of eggs to friends to put in their incubator and they should have hatched out on Tuesday - one did but the rest, although one or to of them had chipped, have not produced chicks - they seem to have died in the egg. Very sad as I was really looking forward to babies second hand. So, sorry S and T - I know how much you were looking forward to it too.

Tomorrow I have friends for the weekend, so I may not get much time to blog - we shall see.

11 comments:

George said...

The coming of autumn? I thought you were still waiting for summer. If you fail to get your own, just come across the pond and we can offer you a blazing summer that will make you welcome cooler weather.

Heather said...

I have noticed the blackberry blossom down here too. The foxgloves and rosebay willow herb are going over - both signs of the end of summer, and it hasn't even started yet. An Indian summer this year, perhaps, maybe, please?!

Hildred and Charles said...

Oh Pat - talk of autumn already!!!
Of course you are right, - the first flush of roses is past, and the lilies are fading fast, but I brought in a bouquet and their wonderful sweet spicy fragrance speaks still of summer! Hang on - so sorry about the pheasant and eggs. Where once we saw so many pheasants on the farm now we are lucky to come across one on our photo drives. Location, location!!!

cloudia charters said...

yes! the seeds of Autumn may be perceived by the sensitive soul in the height of it's predecessor. . . One finds the agreeable sensation that life continues reading your farm country posts. Thanks.



Wishing YOU Aloha, from Waikiki
Comfort Spiral
> < } } ( ° >

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I prefer to call it midsummer though most of the evidence points in the other direction. Most of what you noticed you could have seen down here in the southern lowlands too.

Pondside said...

Summer has only just started over here - I'm hanging onto it!

mumasu said...

I agree, although my son told me the other day he was holding out for an indian summer

Bovey Belle said...

What a shame about Mrs Pheasant, but not the best place to put your nest . . .

Earlier this week I woke up to an Autumn morning - really quite cool, and a mist which lifted after breakfast. The shape of things to come . . . and no summer yet.

Rachel said...

No it is only July and we are still waiting for summer. Perhaps we are going to skip a season this year!

Golden West said...

We're seeing touches of autumn here, as well... The leaves on the ginkgo tree are already starting to turn yellow, which is always a sure sign...

thousandflower said...

The traditional beginning of fall used to be lammas about the first of August. That is half way between the solstice and the equinox and in these latitudes it is when you can see the light begin to change.