Wednesday, 4 January 2012

Guess who came to call?

It is another wild and windy day. But, never daunted, the farmer set off round the fields with Tip and Tess at 8.15 this morning. No sooner had he got into the top pasture than he saw, across on the other side of the field, a fox slinking up the hedge. Neither of the dogs saw it, although their noses in the air suggested they might well have smelt it.

After walking through the fields, along the side of the beck and through a muddy patch, he started back up the far pasture and had only got a few hundred yards up the field when he saw the fox again. Strangely, it was coming towards him, had obviously seen him and did not seem in the least afraid.

This time Tess spotted it and went towards it, standing until they were almost nose to nose. Scared that the fox might attack her, the farmer clapped his hands and the fox turned tail and went off down the pasture, hotly pursued by Tess - obviously a fox hound in Border Terrier skin.

In all his years the farmer has never seen a 'brave' fox who was not both suspicious and scared of humans (let's face it, nothing else preys on them) and we cannot help speculating that this might be a 'pet' fox which has been released. We do sometimes get urban foxes which have been dumped in the countryside. My only hope is that he/she learns quickly that humans are not to be trusted and that fox hunts are best experienced from well down in one's earth - also of course that my hens are safe from a hungry fox!

16 comments:

mrsnesbitt said...

So Mr Fox visited eh Pat? Brrrrrrr thought of venturing outside makes me shiver. Keep warm.
Denise
Just off to make more salad! lol!

Arija said...

The fox must have been beautiful in his winter coat. Poor thing, if it is a dumped pet, was probably hoping for a handout. Makes me think of Dr.Doolittle and the fox hunt.

Heather said...

Foxes are so beautiful but not if they get too close to the hen house. What a treat to see one at such close quarters. I hope he found his lunch in the wild.

Dartford Warbler said...

I hope the "brave fox" keeps well away from your hens. We used to have a beautiful fox family on the edge of our fields. They did no harm and helped to keep the rabbit population down. Sadly, there was an outbreak of mange here last year and it seems to have wiped them out.

Dominic Rivron said...

I was reminded of "seated upon the stump, she was startled to find an elegantly dressed gentleman reading a newspaper. He had black prick ears and sandy coloured whiskers..."

Pondside said...

Oh oh - watch out for your hens!

Everything Changes said...

I came face to face with a fox one day as a kid when I went to the pullet house to feed. I scared him and he scared me. We both took off on the run. But a fox that will not run may have rabies. We had that too once.

Cloudia said...

loved this fabulous true-life vignette, Weaver!



Aloha from Waikiki
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Hildred and Charles said...

I have never seen a fox here in the Similkameen, but they do frequent the meadows in the Cariboo region of B.C.

MorningAJ said...

Poor old Tod if he's been dumped there from the city. I hope he finds his way back to a place where he can be safe (and your hens will be safe too!)

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I've known foxes to walk straight towards me as long as I stood perfectly still but never one so fearless. i would have though that even an urban fox would be wary of dogs.

The Weaver of Grass said...

There was no sign of that fox on this morning's walk but Tess had a bit of a bark where it had been yesterday! Thanks for the comments.

Rachel Fox said...

Border terriers were first bred as fox (and vermin) hunters, so I've read, so no wonder Tess got excited!
x

Bovey Belle said...

How unusual. I would have thought even a town fox will keep away from dogs. I wonder if it had sight problems? Hope it keeps away from your henhouse anyway.

BilboWaggins said...

Interesting but sad. If this creature has been released from somewhere it may not know how to hunt properly in which case it will starve to death fairly soon.

Mary said...

We are familiar with urban foxes as we've had an entire family visiting here in our back garden for several years. You may recall my pics from May when we found 5 new kits under the gazebo and mother coming twice a day to feed them! We do not like them here because rabies is rampant in the state - they are so beautiful (ours are grey, are yours red?) but we'd rather they stay away from the house. Will be interesting to see what this coming Spring will bring!

Or rabbits have gone thanks to the foxes I'm sure - so our plants did better. Pat - watch those hens!

Mary