Thursday, 25 August 2011

An Afternoon Walk






The farmer just managed to get all his last silaging in (and that of someone else he was cutting for) before the weather broke overnight. A great relief and the major jobs done apart from the everlasting "muck-leading" which must precede the cattle coming into the byre for Winter (the "muck" is still knee deep in there and rotting down nicely - a favourite place for the farm cats as it is generating heat).

So this afternoon we went for a nice leisurely walk in the Wetlands, which are old, disused quarries now filled with water. We walked for an hour and never saw another person - it could have been our own estate - and I am sure you will agree that that top photograph makes the idea very nice.

We saw the last remaining tiny wild flowers - the smallest member of the wild geranium family and wild mint; both are low-growing and easy to miss, although as far as the mint is concerned, there is so much of it that a lovely mint smell drifts up as you walk through it.

The geese have done very well there this year. The last time we went there were lots of goslings - now they are almost fully grown. I managed to get quite close before they lifted off and landed on the water, where they knew they were safe.

Finally we encountered a rather angry swan who did not like the look of Tess at all - I fear the feeling was mutual and as they can be quite nasty birds we decided that discretion was the better part of valour and turned round and retraced our footsteps.

It was a warm, sunny afternoon, only the huge puddles in the grass reminding us that we had over half an inch of rain overnight.

##spare a thought for the East Coasters in America who seem as though they are about to bear the brunt of a violent hurricane. First there was that awfully heavy snowfall, then they have had weeks of scorching heat, last week an earthquake and now the possibility of hurricane damage. So anyone out there reading this - we are thinking of you all.

16 comments:

The Crow said...

The coastal regions are gearing up for heavy rain and strong winds, flooding, too, I imagine.

Where I live, south-central Pennsylvania, we rarely have the worst of hurricanes, but we are preparing for heavy rains, should Irene stay her current course.

Thank you for your thoughtful post-script. Your kindness is appreciated.

Martha

angryparsnip said...

I think you do live in a most beautiful place. I love the photos of lake/quarries and all the geese, quite fabulous.
Tess must really love these walks.

cheers, parsnip

Midlife Jobhunter said...

Your geese are very different than mine (I call them mine because they always seem to gather at my dock.) We have the Canadian geese and the Snow geese.

Sounds sad to think of the season's end. Of course, with 108 degree heat forecast for today, I doubt our summer is ending anytime soon. Glad you were able to get your cutting done before the rain. So wish we could get some in Texas.

steven said...

weaver couldn't you see a cottage by the edge of that lovely pond. steven

Heather said...

The disused quarry has become an idyllic spot and a haven for wildlife - a beautiful place to go for a walk. Glad the farmer got all his silage in - we have had torrential downpours today and yesterday when we even had a moat for a while. Our weather might annoy and frustrate us, but we have nothing to contend with on the scale of the USA and other parts of the world. We are so lucky but will still complain!

Titus said...

The first shot is absolutely beautiful, Weaver.
I like swans, but mainly from a distance!

The Solitary Walker said...

Mmm ... nice walk. Wish I'd been with you!

Elizabeth said...

Lovely new header and lovely walk. You were quite right to keep Tess and the swan apart --no good would have come of it!

Yes, having had a mini earthquake we are now awaiting the hurricane......
I told Claudia that it will be a plague of locusts next.
Will keep you posted.

Crafty Green Poet said...

that certainly does look a lovely place for a walk

Nora said...

We have an overpopulation of geese here in the Netherlands. They ruin all the pasture land. They've become too successful and no amount of hunting can get their numbers down.

H said...

I'm so pleased that the quarries and gravel pits are eventually changed back into natural habitats! Round Derby we have many small lakes and ponds where once gravel was extracted. The Wetlands does look a lovely place for an afternoon walk!

Pondside said...

It must have been lovely to have had all that space to yourselves. What a beautiful walk.

harvest said...

Very lovely picture buddy.... Each picture depicting the nature in a special way...and I think without Hay Cutting Part Its impossible.Thank you

Dave King said...

The (relative?) tranquility of your walk only serves to emphasise the potential plight of The East Coasters.

hart said...

Don't forget the earthquake! It was my first and that's a feeling I will always remember.--Hart

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks to those who came with me in spirit on the walk. Glad you all enjoyed it.