Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Addition to yesterday's post.

read today in the Times that our Prime Minister can only see what he is writing if he writes in thick felt tip, as his sight is so bad. I never for one moment doubt his sincerity in writing (I think all grieving parents get a personal letter from him) - after all, he has lost a child himself so does know about losing a loved one at first hand. Maybe his staff should set up some sort of checking system - or maybe the letter should be typed and just signed by him. I don't know the answer but on reading about how bad his sight is I do feel there were some mitigating circumstances.

16 comments:

gleaner said...

Weaver I just came back here because I read more about your PM (you had me interested to follow the story) - his terrible eye injury and poor eyesight and then the recent tragedies with his own children. Immediately I thought it showed him as a man with compassion to hand write despite his obvious failings - although I'm pretty sure he will have his assistant or some-one check them in future.

jinksy said...

When they first showed a close up of the letter on TV yesterday, I thought immediately it looked as though the writer couldn't see very well. I'd have forgiven any other errors because of that first impression, and would simply have appreciated it being hand written as opposed to typed. Empathy wins over correctness, for me, in such circumstances. Obviously, Jamie's mother reacted otherwise.

Totalfeckineejit said...

For once I think people are being a bit hard on the politician.(Can't believe I've just said that.)You would have to question the motives of 'The Sun' newspaper.It's hard to find people more amoral than politicians but (gutter) journalists have them beat hands down.

Elisabeth said...

It's true, isn't it: We are so quick to judge when our leaders get it wrong.

The high moral ground is so easy to take, but now I feel chastened.

Bonnie, Original Art Studio said...

Weaver, I think we all jump to hasty conclusions based on minimal information (which seems very convincing!) at some time or other.
It is humbling when we realize that there are 'mitigating circumstances' as you say.

We just never know what people are struggling with . . . and I prefer to err on the side of giving them the benefit of the doubt.

Poet in Residence said...

I would much rather have a scrawled note in marker pen from Gordon Brown than an epistle from some other highly placed persons. And it wouldn't bother me if Brown spelled my name wrong. People often do.
We would do well to remember that Gordon Brown is NOT the person responsible for the shenanigans that led to a million Iraqis dead and many of our troops and much of our equipment bogged down in Iraq when we should have been in Afghanistan going after the real enemy when we had them on the run.

Hildred and Charles said...

Weaver. I do admire your charity in posting about the mitigating circumstances. Sometimes, as a body, we make such mountains out of obvious molehills, and the media is usually leading us along in righteous indignation.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes gleaner I think you are absolutely correct in all you say.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Jinksy - yes - you are quite right and I think today Jamie's mother has accepted his apology. I do agree that a hand written letter is better, I just think he should have had it checked as he knows how difficult it is for him to be accurate.

The Weaver of Grass said...

TFE - yes - I bet you never thought you would stick up for a politician. Was it published in the Sun? I only saw it in The Times (the sun paper never crosses my threshold - same goes for the Mail too).

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes Elizabeth - I do too to some extent, although i still think he should have had it properly checked. Surely politicians of all people realise how easy it is to put their foot in it.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes Elizabeth - I do too to some extent, although i still think he should have had it properly checked. Surely politicians of all people realise how easy it is to put their foot in it.

The Weaver of Grass said...

I do agree with what you say Bonnie.

Poet - well said - I hope everyone reads your comment. Not sure that I agree about the name spelling in this instance thinking of the subject matter of the letter. But like you, I know what it is to have my surname spelt wrong - it is rarely spelt right in fact.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Hildred and Charles - I couldn't have put it better myself.

Heather said...

Beautiful photos as usual Weaver. I love old stone buildings and that ancient wooden door has been there a year or two. Why do we find fungi so fascinating? Perhaps it is because they are not like 'normal' plants. Hope your shoes dried out and the farmer took pity on you. My eyes are very sensitive to strong sunlight too. I can't say I am a particular fan of our PM but I'm sure he was sincere in his letter of condolence and that he thought it better to write personally than send a typed letter.

Bovey Belle said...

In the Daily Mail today (yes I know - read it with a packet of salt!)was a letter of condolence from an Army Chaplain in WWII. It made me cry, not just a tear to the eye, but proper emotion. I have never read such a beautiful letter (despite the reason behind it) or one guaranteed to bring such comfort to parents of a beloved son who was KIA. I have just been looking to see if there is a letters page online for the Mail, but it seems there's everything but, which is a shame. I'm afraid it makes Gordon Brown's letter look a poor substitute, and I say this despite feeling rather sorry for him now there is such a furore over it. The papers like nothing than to kick a man when he's down.