Wednesday, 12 November 2008

Windows as Picture Frames.

"About New York" (see my blog list) had a lovely photograph on a few weeks ago, showing a view of the road and the Autumn leaves from a window.
It struck me, looking at the picture, that the window frame made a kind of art and that the scene within the frame changed by the minute.
I love art of any kind, but particularly beautiful paintings and my walls are covered with examples; I know them all intimately as I look at them every day, examining a particular section, a favourite patch of colour, a method of adding paint to the canvas. I see bits of them in a new light each time I study them. But when I sit and look through any of my windows on to the outside world I see a similar familiar scene but it changes constantly so that it always a surprise. A different bird lands or takes off from the bird table, a sheep wanders in or out of the picture, a clear sky one minute changes to angry black clouds on a blustery, showery day, the leaves come and go on the trees, the light falls in a different way.
John Nash, the artist, did many of his woodcuts from inside the house in inclement weather. He called them his indoor work. These exquisite works either framed within the window space or sometimes with glazing bars added, show snow scenes, garden scenes, pheasants in the field. Sometimes he adds a vase of flowers on the inside window sill.
My favourite window picture is probably in my bedroom window, where I can see the sun rising this time of year when it is a bit tardy, while drinking my morning cup of tea (the farmer has been well-trained to bring me a cup of tea every morning).
I see the sun, often a ball of fire at this time of year, the clouds tinged with an incredible array of dawn colours, never the same two days running. The icing on the cake is that suddenly the window will be filled with a thousand rooks as they make their way from roost to feeding ground. But then I think of the view from my study window as I write this and I know I am spoilt for choice.

16 comments:

Reader Wil said...

It's amazing that you should say this, because your comment came together with Janice's. And she is an artist who works with frames. She put all her artwork in a frame.
I also like to take photos looking through a gate or an open door. I want to tell you that next week I am going to Egypt for two weeks. I shan't be able to blog. I hope to see the new pyramid.

Red Clover said...

Agreed. Windows are a sort of time travel. Outside is always a different world from the one you left. Do you dare step into it, with all those quails to scatter? p.s. Now that I have a long, tall window above my lounging ottoman, I have a place to watch for birds and quails, etc. Kip comes home to find me sitting here every night. Maybe I should train him to bring me home a donut...

Red Clover said...

Agreed. Windows are a sort of time travel. Outside is always a different world from the one you left. Do you dare step into it, with all those quails to scatter? p.s. Now that I have a long, tall window above my lounging ottoman, I have a place to watch for birds and quails, etc. Kip comes home to find me sitting here every night. Maybe I should train him to bring me home a donut...

willow said...

I am also very spoiled with my window views. November in Central Ohio gives us thick gray skies almost every day, but I enjoy the change of season.

Lovely study view!

Janice Thomson said...

I love art too though nothing beats Nature's grand displays. To have a window with a view is to be lucky indeed.

Mad Bush Farm Crew said...

What a great way of putting words to the scene you see each day. I'm the same I can look out of my windows and see a hawk flying or the calves playing together. Because I paint I completely agree there. Hope you are well. Liz

Kyfarmlife said...

Lovely photos and view! how lucky you are!

Gramma Ann said...

That is a lovely view. That is such unique way to frame your photo.

How wonderful that the farmer brings you tea each morning. Sounds like he's a keeper!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Can't wait for a blog about this new pyramid reader wil. Have a lovely time.

The Weaver of Grass said...

red clover - aren't we lucky to have lovely views from our windows.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Even grey skies can be exciting willow as they begin to change and let the light through.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Lucky indeed Janice - the view where you live ust be spectacular.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks mad bush - yes perhaps we farmers have the best views of all as we can look out on our stock and keep tabs on things. One of our sheep got stuck in a bog yesterday but luckily we saw it in time.

Robyn said...

I love the view from your window. I can't think of anything better than to look out over farm lands.

Dominic Rivron said...

Interesting, thinking of a window and the view through it as a picture. Is it the visual equivalent of 4' 33"?

Arija said...

Views from windows are so specal. Our house on mt.Lofty we so seldom use now but I dearly love the viewa from all the windows, to the point of one day when we thought it surely is time to put the old place on the market, I went around every window and photographed each one in different directions because the aspect outside had always been my delight.