Wednesday, 18 March 2020

A new kid on the block.

I can't help feeling that now there are less people about and most here are self-isolating (almost everyone on my road, which is all bungalows) the number of cats has increased.   There is a lady just down the road who has seven.   One, a large tabby tom without a tail (lost it in an accident) disappeared some months ago but the other six were rarely seen.   Now they are all making a path through my garden in the morning, plus a black and white tom who comes every day and - this morning - a large ginger tom I haven't seen before.
I am pleased to see them.   Now that I have lost Tess I would get a cat.  The only thing that stops me is that the road is a very busy one and I couldn't bear it if the cat got run over. 

My schedule of a walk a day was done reluctantly today (no sign of the sun) but I shall continue to make myself do it.   Already, after only a few days, I can sense how quickly it would be possible to become 'institutionalised' if that is a word I can use without being in an institution.   I am sure John recognises the signs - I am not eager to get up in a morning when there is nowhere beckoning (no lunches out, no keep fit class, no coffee with friends);  it would be easy not to bother with cooking (jacket potato with streaky bacon and oriental greens and mashed carrot and parsnip today, followed by a nice, ripe pear); dozing could become a habit which must be avoided at all costs; so some sort of routine has been organised. 

Read The Times over breakfast, tidy round and stack the dishwasher, make the bed, shower, get dressed, have a coffee, read e mails and send any if necessary, phone son and daughter in law to bring one another up to date, decide what I am having for lunch and prepare it, eat it, tidy kitchen and then Percy and I walk.  This where I am now.
Blogging is good during self isolation - it is literally getting in touch with virtual friends and passing the time of day (and I love it).   Now I think it is time for an hour of Michael Palin's 'Sahara' which I am reading at present and jolly good it is too if you like travel books.  Oh if only my walking was good enough to go to Marrakesh again(he doesn't go in the book - doesn't know what he is missing).

I hope, as we near the first day of Spring, it suddenly begins to get a bit warmer (only eight degrees today but that doesn't stop the spring flowers).




31 comments:

Jane Bellingham said...

Hello Weaver, I’m a ‘silent’ follower of yours. I seem to have missed out on the arrival of Percy. Who is he? Love reading about your life. I’m further down the east coast - in Lincolnshire.

Jayview said...

Here in Australia we are all talking about, and most vulnerable people practising, self-isolation too. Though our medical people want us to keep the term for those tested positive for COVID-19 or who are showing the symptoms but can’t get a test due to limited numbers of test kits. Self-quarantine is the term for those who’ve been ordered into it on getting back from overseas or joining it because they have a known coronavirus contact. But in that case I think we’d need a third term for the sort of social distancing/sel-isolation lots of us are choosing to do to protect ourselves or others?
All the online forms of contact are especially valuable now aren’t they? Do you use Zoom or FaceTime at all. I know of groups who still eat meals together or have a cuppa via these ie doing it at home at same time and conversing via the FaceTime or Zoom screen

JayCee said...

I too am finding that reading everyone's blogs and comments is helping a lot in the current situation. To hear about other people's experiences and what is happening out there.
As we are both still under 70 we can still go out if necessary but that may change if (when) the virus arrives here.
Hoping for some warmer spring weather to arrive soon so that we can at least go outside more, although it is good to see the spring flowers out now and to keep an eye on the tadpoles in our little pond.
Stay safe x

Bonnie said...

Thank you for the reminder of the importance of keeping a schedule or routine. I do find when I am staying home that it sometimes becomes difficult to get up in the morning and get going on my day's activities. Your description of your daily schedule gives a good example for many of us.

We all are learning to make our way in this "new normal" and I feel like we are supportive and helpful to one another. Take care and enjoy your walk with Percy!

Regina M. said...

Weaver, I too find myself in somewhat of a laconic state. Since I'm of the belief that we will be living our new way of life for a long time secluded at home....I'm not as industrious in attacking some of the projects I had planned on. I'm looking out at my rear garden which was going to be cleaned up by a hired person before sowing more wildflower seeds this year. However, I won't be calling him or anyone else (unless an emergency) to do any work here. Pondering how best to take care of this problem after the forecast snow possibly this weekend here in Maine. Think I'm also a bit in a fog digesting all of this negative news. Thought we were in bad enough shape before. Now....??? Simply writing this to you is inspirational and I will light the fire under my fanny this afternoon. Take care & stay well.

Traveller said...

Weave, I don’t comment often but usually read. I too as wondering about Percy but had a sudden thought...I believe he is your walking aid.

angryparsnip said...

I try to keep up doing things that would be easy to let slide. I often envy your days out poetry, lunches and walks. We must always keep doing
For now watching your group of cats mosey on by on their way to the field behind you must be fun. How funny they all walk on your wall.
parsnip xx

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I don't seem to have as many feline visitors as I used to have; they used to gravitate towards my backyard as it's a dog-free and child-free zone. I got very sick last time I was in Marrakech and always intended to go back.

Sheila said...

Love to read how you are staying active. I live in the country in Texas and it is easy just to stay in and do little or nothing. Reading how you spend your day gives me encouragement!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Hello Jane. Nice to welcome you to my blog. I am a Lincolnsire lass too - born in Washingborough, just outside Lincoln. Went to Lincoln Girls' High School.
Jayview - Love these ideas of social contacts

Percy is indeed my Rollator or walking aid and he is very helpful.

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

Thinking of you, Pat. And wishing you well.
Such a strange time. But the dogs, all three of them, are getting lots of walks!
Love,
Pamela

Granny Sue said...

You are wise to have such a routine. I remember how my parents did the same. You have such a wide range of interests, and such an active mind.

I followed your recommendation from a few weeks ago and read Olive Kitteridge. It was a fascinating read, rather like being in a pub or diner and eavesdropping on conversations for a few months. In the end, I can't say I liked Olive herself; she struck me as selfish and self-centered though she had an empathetic heart. Her relationship with her son made me sad and exasperated me at the same time! But the writing was brilliant, absolutely the best I have read in a long time, so I was sorry when the book ended.

Gwil W said...

Pleased to hear about the cats. I think the big tom could be having a 'mice time'. Trying to impress the ladies.

Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe said...

Cats are good companions and give us something to talk to and enjoy. I lost a few cats to the road and I understand your concern. However, an inside cat is just fine and adapts very well to inside life. There are always lots of cats looking for a home, especially those that are older.

Terra said...

Yes, it is good you have a routine to keep you active. I am doing a bit of the same, adding in two walks with my dog, and today I decided to take baby steps to declutter a bedroom that has too much stuff in it.

Margie from Toronto said...

Jayvee - here in Canada we've ben told its the following:
.Social Distancing for what everyone is now being advised to do, especially the elderly, not ill but staying safe & away from others.
.Self-Isolation if you have been diagnosed or suspected or just returned from overseas - lasts 14 days
.Quarantine - if you live with someone who is in isolation then you must go into quarantine, both away from the ill person and from others.

Most of us have been told to practise social distancing for the next few weeks going out only for food or essentials or perhaps a nice walk - away from others. Schools are closed, many offices have closed or people are working from home, all places of entertainment and public venues are closed, all religious gatherings have stopped, many shops have already closed and malls are on limited hours, and cafes, bars & restaurants can only open for take-away or delivery. There are no sporting events of any kind and all tourist attractions & venues have closed. Grocery stores & pharmacies will stay open and many have now decided to offer the first hour of opening to seniors or disabled so that they can get in and out before the hordes descend. Although I must say, even though there was a bit of panic buying last week when the schools closed it was still fairly orderly and polite.

I am trying to keep to a bit of a routine as I know how quickly I can get lethargic and end up sleeping all day (this is what happened when I first retired and why I went back to work PT). My office closed yesterday and I don't expect to go back until April 13th and that could change depending upon what happens next.

I hope everyone stays well and finds a way to keep active and involved.

Joanne Noragon said...

I'm feeling the downside of confinement myself, Sue. I took a nap today. I'm afraid of these bad habits, too.

Penny said...

I am wondering if blogging will see an upsurge as we miss seeing friends face to face. I shopped today, with some trepidation. I kept my distance and washed and sanitized. Will it be enough.

Cro Magnon said...

I would love to visit Marrakech again too, but I don't expect I will. It's definitely one of my favourite cities.

Jane Bellingham said...

Thank you for answering my question about Percy.
I’d forgotten you are a Yellow Belly, you’ve mentioned in previous blogs I recall.
I’m an incomer and now reside in Mablethorpe (on the coast). Love it here.

Heather said...

You sound very well organized. The thought of a lock-down is rather daunting but I have stocked up on art and craft supplies and should have plenty to see me through the next few months. I did my last supermarket shop today for the time being and my son will call round for my shopping list and get it for me temporarily. I shall pick my moments for taking a walk and have worked out a root which avoids the town. Not particularly attractive but not so many people about. As long as my old laptop stays the course I can still enjoy your blog posts.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Jane - Mablethorpe - know it well from childhood holidays.


Thans to everyone - keep up the contact in these dark days.

Mary said...

Know that many folks are thinking of you and happy to hear about what is going on, even if it is just within the walls of your home. Your common sense and inquiring mind are inspiring. Sounds like you know what you need to do to keep yourself motivated in these hard times. All the best.

Librarian said...

I do love my daily routine, it keeps me sane and safe. I love it even more when I can break it up every now and then, such as when a special holiday comes round or even something as simple as the weekend after a busy working week.
As I am working from home, it is not hard to keep the routine. I get showered and dressed and have breakfast before the first telephone conference of the day, usually there are several more in the course of the day. I have my lunch break as usual, only that I am not having a hot meal at the canteen, just a cheese sarnie on my own.
When the weather is nice (as it has been here since Tuesday), I go out for a walk and/or a run after work. Today, I even ventured to the supermarket for some fruit and veg.
So, pretty normal for me except that I am not going to the pub, not visiting my parents and not travelling to O.K.'s this weekend.

Karla said...

This is a great idea, to stay as active as possible! We tell my husband's 90 year old mother, the more you do, the more you can keep doing. She's not keen to go to a nursing home, but she sits most of the time and will more than likely end up in one, or, go through all of her money with at-home care. She doesn't want either of those, but one or the other is inevitable, if she won't get up and move around. I love your attitude and spirit! I do so enjoy reading your blog!

Salty Pumpkin Studio said...

Napping is a skill made better by not napping to excess.
The owner, and probably the cats, sense seeing them is appreciated.
Happy Spring!

Jules said...

It was lovely and warm in the sun today. I met a new cat this afternoon, he was very friendly. X

Daisy Debs said...

Thinking of you ! The napping thing ....me too . Also the cup of tea at 2am . It is because we have it all going round and round in our minds ,trying to process it all .
Here in Cornwall we are all worrying about all the visitors that will descend apon us over the Easter break possibly pushing our hospital to breaking point if the virus kicks off here ! We love our visitors but right now it could bring terrible problems .
We are in isolation but lucky as we can go out into our garden where we are busy planning the veg garden at the moment . Got to keep busy , safe and cheerful everybody ! :)

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks everyone - keep soldiering on.

donna baker said...

So nice to hear you are soldiering on through these days. I haven't been able to comment on posts. I didn't know about Tess and am truly sorry. I lost my Emmy two weeks ago and I thought I'd die, but I'm still here. I'll be checking back. Donna @ Gather

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