Thursday, 10 January 2019

Thursday

An afternoon playing for residents of a care home deep in the Yorkshire Dales - just three of us and a book of songs dating back as far as the First World War.   Ukuleles for us and a box of instruments for the residents - bells, tambourines, little drums and the like.   Some residents in the early stages of dementia, others with mobility problems, others who just feel the need for residential care in what is a very 'homely' home.   They seem to enjoy it = we go once a month =  I certainly do.

The journey is always pleasant whatever time of year (not least because W drives and I sit and chat and enjoy the view).   No lambs yet - I am sure one or two farmers in the Dales will have started lambing but higher up the Dale, where we went, the majority of the sheep are Swaledales and lambing starts much later.   The weather was pleasant today but it is easy in January to be lulled into a false sense that Spring is on its way - not so - January, February and even March can be cruel as we go above a thousand feet. 
 
Home again.   Tess had her long walk with PetPals this afternoon.   Now the doors are locked, we have both had our tea, everywhere is tidied and we have settled down for the evening.   Tess to do what she seems to do most of the day now - sleep- and me to watch the one River programme I didn't see - the one on the Amazon.  The ones on the Mississippi and the Nile were excellent, so I am looking forward to this one.

When the programme is over I may well start next month's Book Group choice -  'Days without end' by Sebastian Barry.   It is about America in the 1850's - the Indian wars and the Civil war.   Has anyone read it?

 

14 comments:

Lilbitbrit said...

I think you keep yourself young by sharing. I will definitely try and get that book from my library. It seems a good book to read as I live in Pennsylvania. Also my husband's great, great, uncle, might need another great in there. Died in the Civil War.

Sue in Suffolk said...

Hope we don't get the snow that's in Greece and Austria at the moment, non stop and metres deep. No signs of anything like that yet....... hopefully you will be able to cross the Dales again next month

justjill said...

Sounds like a lovely day. Would love someone to film you all playing your ukeleles.

Brenda Burke said...

I was avid about reading civil war books and then Vietnam- those are the ones I can't put down! Enjoy!!

Joanne Noragon said...

I like that your life has settled in, and so has Tess'. She knows alternate care takers and walkers are the cat's meow, so to speak, or the dog's bark! As in "Woof, woof, lets go now."

Sue said...

My friend's daughter, who is 16, asked for and received a ukulele for Christmas. She's been taking guitar lessons also for a few years. Hope she enjoys the ukulele as much as you do!

Librarian said...

It is wonderful that there are people like you and your ukulele group around, Pat! I am certain the afternoon when you come visiting is a highlight for all the residents (and probably also the staff) at the care home.
Lambing in the middle of winter sounds like a weird idea of Mother Nature - having young ones when conditions are so averse, and the little ones can so easily die.

Derek Faulkner said...

Down here on Sheppey, where there is only one small sheep farmer, lambing starts at the end of March. However, talking to him yesterday, it appears one ram got among the sheep one night, well before time and so a few lambs are expected at the end of February.

Heather said...

I haven't come across that book and tend to look through the authors and titles among the bookcases on both floors of my block of flats. I do find a little treasure occasionally.
Your afternoon playing for the care home residents must give them so much pleasure, especially as they are invited to join in.
I hope the weather is not too harsh when lambing starts, for the sake of the lambs and the farmers.

A Heron's View said...

To have lambs coming before March is not a good idea and is bad practise, unless a randy ram breaks into the flock then there is not much thast can be done.

wherethejourneytakesme said...

I think it is great that you go into the care homes to entertain and you obviously enjoy playing your ukulele but when you mentioned the first world war songs I had to smile to myself because my mum (aged 93 and lived through the second world war) has one major fear (as do many of her friends in the assisted apartment she presently lives in) - they are really worried that if they ever have to go into a care home all they will sing are those songs like Tipperary from the first world war - they are not to do with my generation she says but why do they insist on singing them! They have a point I suppose!

Anonymous said...

I enjoyed that book, though I do tend to like all of Barry’s books.

I have been a member of a couple of different book clubs but found with both there was too much socialising and not enough book discussion. It was all nice but not what I wanted out of a book club. Once a member came who hadnt finished the book. She asked that we not discuss it in too much detail in case it spoilt it for her!

traveller

The Weaver of Grass said...

Heron - sadly I think early lambing is all to do with getting Spring lamb on to a plate and making more money.
Where the journey - you have a good point here and I do feel that way myself - but I don't lead the group of players so don't have a lot to do with the song book.

Thanks for the comments everyone.

Derek Faulkner said...

I often wonder how many of the people that you play to are actually younger than you and are possibly jealous that you are still able to get out and about and do what you do.
You make a valid point about the early lambs, early lambs at the market will normally be guaranteed to sell and for a good price.