Friday, 15 June 2018

Calamity

I was going to put a heading of Disaster, but in the giant scheme of things this is really not a disaster when one thinks of all the 'real' disasters.   But it certainly is a bit of a calamity and I am going to sleep on it before thinking what I can do to remedy the situation because at the moment I have absolutely no idea.

This is a lovely neat and tidy estate and everyone keeps their gardens and in particular their lawns in pristine condition this time of the year.   Any lawn which does not keep up with this standard is really an eyesore. 

I have no lawn mower, mainly because I really do no longer have the strength to push one, even if it is an electric one.   My gardener is very good and comes each week to do an hour in the back garden (which is beginning to take shape nicely marestail notwithstanding)  and an hour mowing and strimming my lawn.   He has not been this week and  as it is prime growing season it is no exaggeration to say that my lawn looks like a wild flower meadow - pretty with trefoil, clover and buttercups it might be but it is no lawn.

This evening I rang my gardener, expecting him to be out with his mates on a Friday night.   He answered the phone - he has 'done his back in' to use his words, is flat out on the settee and can hardly move.   So my dilemma is what do I do  about my grass?   I am sure every gardener in the area has a full time table at present so how am I going to find anyone?   Watch this space.

I have spent the afternoon in the garden doing various jobs to the best of my ability.    I have had a lovely display of pansies in tubs over the last four or five months - they have been under my kitchen and sitting room windows in the front of the house.   But we have had a huge gale this week and it finally put paid to them, almost blowing them out of their tubs.    So this morning I bought geraniums and violas and this afternoon I changed the soil and planted the new bedding out.    Hard work, but now it is done I feel much happier.   So all is not lost - now I just have to find someone with a mower and an hour to spare.

18 comments:

Rachel Phillips said...

My brother cuts grass for a living and when he is out cutting in an urban street he is frequently asked to do lawns next door, up the road, across the road etc. by people rushing over to "grab" him, He does them, they are usually pretty tiny and take less than half an hour. Grab the first one you see, like you did the plumbers. If not, let it grow, and don't worry about the neighbours.

Bovey Belle said...

I wonder if one of your neighbours would help out for the time being? They sound a very helpful and approachable lot, so I am sure they would step up to the mark. Meanwhile, you said you liked the wildflower meadow look : )

We acquired someone to come and cut our paddock regularly and return it to "lawn" when he called yesterday, looking for a neighbour who had booked him (but his first visit there). We won't know ourselves when it's tidy and not just run over with the topper!

Heather said...

Tell any disgruntled neighbours that you are trying a wildflower lawn as it is more eco-friendly - it shouldn't be cut until September to allow things to reseed! I do hope your gardener will make a good recovery, poor chap. Sorry your plants suffered so badly with the gales. We got off fairly lightly down here.

Tom Stephenson said...

Sodium Chloride, Weave. Works wonders.

the veg artist said...

Young people always need cash - ask around if anyone knows of someone who could bring their dad's mower and do yours for a few weeks. I call this 'borrowing an elf' when I need a nephew for something!

anonymous said...

You may find it awkward to ask anyone to help you by mowing your lawn.Perhaps it would be easier to explain your dilemma to your closest neighbor and ask them if they know someone you could hire,or if they knew who else might know a gardener willing to have another customer.

angryparsnip said...

Some good ideas here.
Maybe as your garden center ?

cheers, parsnip

Virginia said...

Poor gardener! Bad backs are a devil if you need them operational for heavy work.

Perhaps the local high school or church might have a "youth" wanting to make a few pounds ?

Joanne Noragon said...

Or put up a small sign, Gardner's back is out!

Susan said...

You would probably be doing a young person a real favour by having them cut your lawn.

Bonnie said...

You have some good suggestions here. I would ask a friend or neighbor to recommend someone or maybe like Parsnip mentioned ask a garden center. You can't know for sure how long your gardener will be out so it would be good to simply explain the situation and let them know it could be a few weeks. I bet you can find someone and then when you do you will have a second person to call whenever necessary.

Cro Magnon said...

My ride-on mower (Rory) is out of action, and the repair man can't come until next Wednesday; during which time my grass will grow very long. Yesterday Lady Magnon wanted to buy another one (£1,800); I wouldn't let her (obviously).

Derek Faulkner said...

Nothing worse than getting into a mind set whereby you feel that your neighbours' standards have to be your standards. If they feel that your lawn is letting the side down then there's no reason why one of them can't spare you an hour to get your lawn back into shape. Personally I'd enjoy the buttercups and daisies, and even more, enjoy being different.

Gwil W said...

Small sign. 'Summer Meadow' or borrow a goat.

Librarian said...

All good suggestions here, but most of all I agree with Derek - it should not be your neighbours who determine what your garden looks like, but you. And knowing you a little bit from your blog, I can not imagine your garden would ever look in a way that the general standard of your neighbourhood suffers.
I keep reading that we need to let our gardens be a little more natural and not too "clinical", for the benefit of butterflies and other insects, birds and all wildlife really.

Alphie Soup said...

Ah yes. The neighbourhood peer pressure. Lots of suggestions here, you will be spoiled for choice in making a decision.

Alphie

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Buy a donkey!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Neighbour pressure - see my Saturday post!
Nice heavy shower at present - plants perking up considerably.