Thursday, 14 June 2018

An afternoon of pleasure.

First of all there is the drive through Wensleydale on a sunny afternoon - strong gale blowing and not very warm, but one doesn't notice that shut in a car.   Then, on arrival, there is an hour and a half of playing ukuleles for the elderly and/or dementia sufferers at the Care Home we were bound for - just friend W and I - the two of us.

All the old songs - how the residents sing and enjoy the afternoon.   They look through the books, call out a number they would like to sing and together we all sing it.   There is a lovely old gentleman who knows the verse to 'When I'm cleaning windows' and sings it before everyone joins in on the chorus. 

Towards the end of the session a lady I hadn't seen before said could we play 'The Old Rugged Cross' - we couldn't.   It's not really suitable for ukulele anyway, but we asked her if she could sing it and she sang the first verse in a beautiful, clear voice - then we all joined in on the chorus.

Coming home through the lovely dale we realised just how very tiring it is to play and sing non-stop - we were exhausted.  But what a grand time we had all had.

 

13 comments:

the veg artist said...

I've got a really good memory for all the hymns I learnt as a child, with a mix of Church of England and Baptist thrown in. I've just tested myself on The Old Rugged Cross - I'll probably be singing it for weeks now! There's nothing like a group sing-song, whether in church, choir, pub or community. I miss it.

Heather said...

Singing in a group is a lovely pastime. Your musical afternoons sound so much fun. The day down here started with gale force wind and sideways drizzle. The wind lessened and the drizzle stopped thank goodness, but it was very muggy and exhausting. However, by late afternoon the sky had cleared completely and we had a lovely evening with just a light breeze. The weather is so peculiar these days.

Tom Stephenson said...

Turned out nice again.

Sandi said...

I love that song.

Bonnie said...

How wonderful for you, W and the residents. I know it must be tiring for you especially with the drive time on top of the singing time. I'm sure these singing groups must bring so much happiness to so many. You are blessed to be doing this! How well I remember The Old Rugged Cross from my childhood. I love the old hymns and around here you don't hear them as much as you used to. Bless you Weaver for doing so much for so many!

Joanne Noragon said...

What a beautiful day!

Cro Magnon said...

What wonderful times you have, it makes my semi-hermit life seem very dull.

Librarian said...

Every time you tell us about your ukulele afternoons at the dementia group it makes me happy to know that there are people like you who do something really good for others without asking something in return.
And of course, I now imagine the drive through Wensleydale on a sunny early summer afternoon - wonderful!

Beachcomber said...

When I was in a church porch yesterday I saw an poster advertising a “Singing for Health” group.
It emphasised that it was not a choir. I wish I lived near enough to join because it really does lift my spirit to sing.
We had a choir in our village started when Gareth Malone was doing a series on television but it closed after
3 years through lack of a pianist.
I love the fact that you are encouraging yourselves and others though your hobby.
Sue.

Rachel Phillips said...

A new life you lead now.

Sue said...

You bring so much pleasure to other people with your music, it is a gift.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

That sounds like a lovely afternoon. My mother would also have been able to supply the words of most of George Formby's songs. She liked his music since he once called into the pub that was run by her parents. She said that he was a very polite and rather quiet man, not at all like the cheeky character he portrayed on stage.

Midmarsh John said...

Think solvable nuisance not calamity. If your neighbours are anything like mine there will be someone willing, even offering, to help out once the word gets round. The suggestion of asking around to see whether a youngster would like to earn a bit of extra pocket money sounds a good idea.