Friday, 11 November 2016

We need to remember.

Friday is market day in our little town and quite a busy market it is too when the weather is right - as it was today.    There is not a single vestige of snow left anywhere and the sun has shone all day.

It so happens that our War Memorial stands at the top of the market square - and today is November 11th.

At around a quarter to the hour a group of people began to gather and by a couple of minutes to the hour a sizeable crowd had gathered.   I had intended to join them to stand for two minutes to remember the war dead but my watch was a couple of minutes slow.   As I bought my cheese from the cheese lady (who has almost every cheese known to man) she said she might have to stop in mid-service to observe the two minutes silence.   So I joined her and we both stood by the stall.   Gradually, as people walked up the market, they seemed to realise what was happening and everyone stood in silence for the two minutes.   It was quite a moving occasion.

Two minutes out of the whole year is nothing - but it is just a token of appreciation for the many  who have given their lives over the years - there has hardly been a year when there has not been a war somewhere has there? And it is also good to remember the thousands of wounded men who have lost limbs or had other life-changing injuries - just two minutes; that is all it takes from our lives.  

14 comments:

donna baker said...

Glad your day is bright and yes, it is good to remember those who have served. Our little town is having an armed forces parade tonight.

Heather said...

Since the war in Afghanistan more people seem to be making time to remember, wherever they are and whatever they are doing. When I was young I can remember the traffic stopping, and bus drivers getting out of their cabs to stand with heads bowed for two minutes. In later years nothing stopped, but now again people are making an effort. Today in our Tesco an announcement was made and everyone stopped working and customers stopped shopping for two minutes. It's not much to ask is it. I was at home at 11 o'clock this morning so had a little private remembrance.

Alphie Soup said...

Lovely post, Weaver Pat. Sadly I didn't see too many people wearing poppies in our city yesterday but there is a big international population here and there is not the same connection to the past.

Alphie

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

Remembrance Day, as it is called here, is still very important with poppies being worn, ceremonies happening in many cities and towns and the minutes of silence observed in many situations. My own father was too young to join, but his older brother did and was a tailgunner. Thank you for also observing, Pat. It is still important. -Jenn

Cro Magnon said...

My two minutes silence will be on Sunday, when I shall join those at the Cenotaph (on TV). I was unable to join with yesterday's moment of respect, but would never fail to remember.

Rachel said...

We all remember all the time.

Librarian said...

There has indeed never been a DAY on this planet without a war going on somewhere, let alone a year. It's just that of course we feel more touched by it when it is closer to home, either geographically or because our loved ones are involved.

Derek Faulkner said...

I think that Rachel got the words right.

Elizabeth said...

I managed to get a British poppy from the English shop here.
Yes, we will always remember I think.
We don't have the two minutes' silence here or the poppies but 11/11 is a Hallowed Day.
On another note - 50% of people are in mourning here after the hideous election.
Usually after an election that goes 'the wrong way' one sort of gets over it.
Usually people merely elect someone with different views. This time they have elected a vindictive liar
who tried to undermine Obama and mocks handicapped people.
I'm sure you know all this.
I'm just profoundly sad for my grandchildren.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them...

thelma said...

It was good that small public gatherings came together to remember, but also to remember as the Librarian said that war is a continuous nightmare every day all round the world.

Gwil W said...

I hate war.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks to you all.

Lucy Corrander at Loose and Leafy said...

A few days ago, on the radio, I learned of a campaign - not quite a campaign but can't think of the word - to commemorate (again not the right word) the wives of those whose husbands have died in wars - another part of forgotten women's history - and the ripple effect of loss.