Monday, 12 September 2016

Monday

Back to earth this morning after the lovely day out yesterday.   This morning I added an extra photograph to yesterday's post about our day out because D, one of the friends, took a photo on his mobile phone and sent it to me this morning.   I thought you would like to see what we all looked like.   So if you want to see what the farmer and I look like when we are together, then scroll back one post to see us.

The eastern side of the country is all set to get a week's very warm Indian Summer - well it certainly hasn't been all that warm today and there have been several showers.   The sky is mostly cloudy and there is a strong, quite cool breeze.   Maybe it will begin tomorrow.

The farmer has had a bonfire today.   He always waits until the wind is in a favourable direction (i.e. to miss blowing the smoke back into the village which is very close over the fields, and to miss it blowing back towards the house and our neighbours).   Farmers have to have a licence in order to be able to light a bonfire but it certainly does mean that the yard can be kept much tidier.

I am now going to sew together my little knitted jacket for my forthcoming great grandchild (sex unknown as they don't wish to know in advance).  When it is all finished I will put it in a post to show you (the men needn't look that day unless they are themselves the knitting and embroidery type.)

And before you laugh at that let me tell you about my mother's brother, my Uncle Albert, who was a bachelor until he was in his fifties.   He was a plate layer on the railway and his hobby was embroidery.   Every niece or nephew who married (my mother was one of eight so there were plenty of them) was given a book of tablecloth patterns and chose one which Albert embroidered as the wedding present.   I still have mine sixty four years later - linen with coffee-coloured cut our work of oak leaves and acorns.   A work of art.

13 comments:

Derek Faulkner said...

I thought that you was supposed to be sharing our heatwave today Pat - 29 degrees here today and 31 forecast for tomorrow. I adore the sun and heat but after nearly three months of it with no rain to talk of, it is starting to get a bit wearing.

Heather said...

I would love to have met your Uncle Albert - what a very special person. I'm so glad you still have the tablecloth he made you. I think it is supposed to be hot and humid tomorrow. If so I will not be mowing the lawns but hibernating indoors. I long for spring and summer but can't stand heat and humidity. I can sympathise with Derek Faulkner.

Heather said...

That's a lovely photo of all of you in the sunshine yesterday.

Rachel said...

Very hot and a wonderful summer. You look good in the photo.

Cro Magnon said...

Stinking hot here, with some rain promised for tomorrow. I like the heat, but like it to stay around the 25 C mark.

Sue said...

Bonfires are banned in this part of France but it is a rule that is quietly ignored. Although it would be foolhardy to light one here at the moment, the countryside is tinder dry and there is a high risk of fire. Great to see the photo of you and farmer together.

Librarian said...

Very nice picture, I can tell the smiling people are comfortable around each other, and your jacket is very pretty with the cheerful pattern and colours. It's a shame that your dog didn't want to smile into the camera!

My Uncle Alfred (actually my Mum's uncle, so he was my great-uncle) loved to knit - with a knitting machine. He had one at home and produced very fashionable and elegant knit dresses for his wife, and no doubt many other things.
Until he retired, he was a Civil Servant working at the registry office of his hometown's town hall. He conducted my parents' civil wedding ceremony just a little over 50 years ago.

The Broad said...

I like the picture of you very much! It looks like a perfect day in the Yorkshire Dales. My husband also waits for the perfect direction of wind when he burns the garden refuse. Trouble is he has a knack for instigating the wind to change direction just as the smoke starts rising!

donna baker said...

That is surprising in the country (that you have to get a license to burn) as in the US, no rules for burning outside city limits. It is upsetting in the city that you can't burn under any circumstances. I have many small limbs from the bad summer storm that I have to load up and haul to the farm to get rid of.

Frances said...

Weaver, it's interesting to learn what is involved in the Farmer's igniting his bonfire. There were many oak trees around my parents house, and every autumn we did lots and lots of raking as leaves and acorns fell from the branches. Back then, 1950s and 60s, it was permitted to burn the leaves at the graveled border between the front yard and the paved road. Since then, the rules have changed. No more fires allowed.

The country sanitation department makes appointments to come around and pick up leaves that have been bagged, in plastic.

My Dad for years did have a compost caged area at the far end of the back yard. I think that some of the results were added to parts of his gardens.

Nice memories of autumn.

I would love to see a photograph of that embroidered tablecloth. It sounds like a really beautiful gift to be treasured, as you have done. xo

Rachel said...

EU Directives Donna.

Fairtrader said...

Dear Weaver!!
I actually showed that other post to my mother ( 78 years old) but that was before you put in that lovely picture of the "gang" hanging out!! How happy and joyful you all look!! You and the Farmer are really very sweet!
My mother was fascinated that old ladies would sit with a computer and spend time like teenagers. She doesn't like me blogging either, everything connected to internet is harmful, foolish and potentially dangerous . She did enjoy the pictures though and fell silent when she understood you are not the only slightly older lady I read blogs from. She always was the one speaking to anyone that looked nice, age, race or creed has never mattered. When she takes the train up here to visit she always get off the train shouting to someone or hugging a complete stranger. In another world she could be a blogger.
Thank you for these lovely pictures Pat, I am so glad life is good to you!!!. My Applesafari is the most adventurous I have done for some time, and the days pass quickly in the late summerheat.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks everyone. I will post a picture of that embroidered tablecloth one day soon.