Saturday, 16 July 2016

The Beauty of the Countryside.

  I refuse to be downhearted today.   When all the news is of killing and strife - about which I can do absolutely nothing - I shall concentrate instead on the beauty of our countryside and how lucky I am to be living in it rather than in the middle of some noisy city.

The hedges on our lane play host to countless beautiful flowers and the most beautiful of all at this time of the year is the wild rose, of which there are many in all colours from almost white to a very deep pink.

The other flower, which vies for first place in beauty at this time of the year, and which flowers up and down the lane, is the honeysuckle.   I suppose it has the edge over the rose
because it has a glorious scent.

Meadow sweet is also in flower - that creamy, lacy plant - again with a sweet smell.

So all in all it is a joy to walk in the lane and to  see the Summer flowers in all their glory.  I shall try to get pleasure from them in these troubled times.

Incidentally, of all the words in the English language 'honeysuckle' has got to be one of my favourites.   Have you a favourite (and no, John, you can't have Scotch eggs as yours).

 -

27 comments:

Derek Faulkner said...

Absolutely right Pat, why so many people spend so much time worrying about strife in other countries baffles me - get out in our beautiful countryside, smell the air, smell the flowers and enjoy every minute of it.
Do you know, I really can't think of one particular word that would be my overall favourite.

John Gray said...

Strange pat, but with a heavy heart i have been cutting down our overgrown honeysuckle which covered our front door!

George said...

That's the spirit, Pat! Take pleasure in what you can and forget the rest.

donna baker said...

I do like the word leviathan. Hope I spelled it right, but I know you'd correct me being the teacher. I used to make up words to make the kids laugh when they were grumpy. Mung, with a drawn out twang got a smile every time.

Joanne Noragon said...

Never too many flowers!

English Rider said...

I do so miss English hedgerows, with all the flowers of the different seasons and always something scurrying around. Nightingale might vie for first place.
My dream job would be picking names for paint colors.

Unknown said...

Two fvourite words............Eglantine and Coramandel.

Robin Mac said...

What a lovely picture you have painted of your English hedgerows. Our countryside is so different, but still lovely to go wandering in, and much better than worrying about the woes of the world. That is far too depressing.
I can't think of one particular word to be my favourite.

Cro Magnon said...

It's 'Lords and Ladies' season here. As well as being very attractive plants, I do love the name.

Helsie said...

I don't think there is any other country that can equal England for flowers. I love the way they are everywhere...in the gardens, along the roadside, in the woods, growing on the houses , in the colourful hanging baskets. They are an absolute delight.

Sue said...

Serendipity.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

Two mountains in the Lake District - Blencathra and Glaramara.

Midmarsh John said...

The best wine I ever made, years ago, was made with concentrated rose hip syrup.
It's a good time of year for scented flowers. I had a small pot of miniature carnations in the conservatory for a day waiting to be given to Y as a birthday present. The scent in there was subtle but delightful.

The Weaver of Grass said...

I am glad you all agree about enjoying the British countryside - especially at this time of the year. Some interesting favourite words - I especially like coromandel. (not sure about Blencathra as it implies that I might have to climb it!)
Thanks for calling in.

Acornmoon said...

I am not sure about a favourite word but I do love the poem about honeysuckle, " I know a bank where the wild thyme grows" Is sweet woodbine honeysuckle?

Heather said...

How refreshing this post is and it brings back joys from my past when I lived near country lanes and always enjoyed trying to identify the plants and flowers I saw. My father was a country lover and taught me most of them.
I think most of us feel totally helpless to do anything to improve the state of the world and being appreciative and thankful for what we have around us is the only way to stay sane.

Dartford Warbler said...

I can see your lovely Yorkshire lanes in my mind's eye. Here, the heather is coming into flower and we plan a short walk out onto the heath this afternoon. Nature puts our human troubles into perspective.

Frugal in Essex said...

You have such interesting countryside to look at in Yorkshire because of the changing contours. Essex is very flat and far less interesting but I still find it beautiful. We have some great beaches, farmland and woodland. I'm grateful for everything I have in my life.

Minigranny said...

I always loved Kingcups which used to grow in boggy land near the beck in our village -haven't seen them for years. I've often thought Doggerel would be a good name for a hedgerow plant - it would have to have a raffish air to it like a Ragged Robin.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

I like "mellifluous"... and "rhubarb" and "nincompoop".

Isn't "Honey, Suckle!" a command often heard in American maternity hospitals?

Gwil W said...

My favourite English word is two words: Coastal Path.

Whenever I see it on a signpost I aim straight for it. You are so lucky to live on such a beautiful island with its thousand of miles of coastal paths, and all of them unique.

Derek Faulkner said...

26 degrees and hot and sunny here today Pat and getting hotter, probably too hot for you.

Beverley said...

Lavender is my favourite.

Rachel said...

I put my words on my Sunday Morning post yesterday as I believed I was too late for here.

Librarian said...

While I don't have one particular favourite word in English, there are several I like very much. One of them is colander.
Your post made my anticipation increase - the week after next, my sister and I will arrive in Ripon for your annual Yorkshire Holiday! We'll get to travel along the beauitful country lanes you have just described, on the bus, in my sister-in-law's car and of course on foot - for two entire weeks!!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Yes, Acornmoon, I think woodbine is indeed honeysuckly.
What a lot of lovely words you give me here (I did enjoy Gwil's too). Thanks for such a pleasing response - and a chance to smile regardless of the state of the world.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Sorry Acornmoon - of course I meant honeysuckle - although the alternative I mis spelt does sound rather nice - I think I feel rather honeysuckly a fter reading these replies(apart from Y P's - no thanks!)