Monday, 4 July 2016

Cutting week?

This time of the year, which many years ago would have been hay time and nothing else , the weather is really vital, so the weather forecast (which of course is much more sophisticated these days) is listened to avidly.   Our forefathers went by their years of experience and the wealth of folklore sayings to help them along the way.   On the whole this folklore and the sayings that go with it is still pretty accurate.   Red sky at night does usually  mean a fine day and similarly red sky in the morning often means it is likely to rain later in the day.

The long-range forecast yesterday suggested that after today (when rain is forecast later) the weather would improve and we might possibly get three or four days of nice weather.

We have one field - the paddock - in which the farmer always likes to make hay (for old times sake really) and I see he has just gone past the kitchen window with the cutter on the back of the tractor.   Is he going to cut the paddock even though rain is forecast later - I do hope not.   But of course if he does he can always change his mind about the hay and make it into silage.

The cats will not be pleased as they like to use the hay barn as their winter home - sleeping amongst the snuggly bales while the hedgehogs hibernate behind the bales at the bottom of the heap.  And several friends rely on the hay for their horses in the winter months.

Should haymaking ensue, I will post photographs of progress as the week goes on!

16 comments:

Derek Faulkner said...

Hay making has started here on Sheppey today and a successful week is predicted thanks to a good weather forecast, I guess they've got to take the plunge some time. When I came back from the reserve this morning the farmers were also taking off the fields the rolls of polythene bagged silage that they cut and baled over the weekend.
Guess it won't be long before the rape is combined and wheat and barley is starting to yellow up.

The Weaver of Grass said...

The rain arrived at 3pm and now it is raining heavily. When the farmer went past the window with the cutter on his tractor he was actually going out to cut the sides of the lane as far as the main roasd.

Derek Faulkner said...

Seems like the farmer knew what he was doing then. No rain forecast here all week, let's hope they're right. Clouded over 'safternoon though.

Terra Hangen said...

I think your farmer enjoys his hay and silage making, like you said, for old time's sake. Plus the hay and silage are useful.

Dawn McHugh said...

I am so hoping next year we can try hay making, I would love to have a barn of hay to see the animals through winter :-)

Simon Douglas Thompson said...

Here's hoping for you. I'm fed up with this wretched weather, and want to have a game of cricket on a nice warm day, with walks in the evening!

Frances said...

Sorry about the rain arriving.

Tonight is when the department store Macy's sponsors a big fireworks show to celebrate the 4th of July. (Our Independence Day...I type quietly.)

Rain might be part of the show.

Tomorrow will bring good weather, and I'll need to return The Running Hare to the library. I've got just a bit more to read before reached the end of this marvelous book.

Best wishes to you and the Farmer. xo

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

We had a forecast of 15 days of temperatures in the mid 70s and sunshine every day - and it has deteriorated to a high of 61 and rain - and that is to continue for another two weeks - what is wrong with those forecasters? Can't they look out the window and see the signs in nature? I am much better at forecasting than they are - and so are most of the farmers around here - you see them cutting hay when the forecast is for rain - and not cutting when the forecast is for sun, if they are paying attention to nature'signs they know what the weather will be. Hope your haying goes perfectly.

Librarian said...

The scent of cut grass, and then how it changes when it is left to dry on the field and turn into hay, is THE scent of summer for me.
It was threatening rain all day Saturday, and some of Sunday, but never came about. Just as well, as I was glad to do the trial 10 km run on Sunday morning, in preparation for the "real" run this coming Saturday evening.
Now the week has started and it's lovely sunny and bright, with some clouds and not too hot - perfect for being out on walks and hikes, but I'll be spending all day at the office, every day.

Sue in Suffolk said...

It was THE most worrying time of the year, but somehow in 23 years we only lost one crop. Our goats loved our own hay best of all

thelma said...

I always loved the hay bales, that I fed to my two, the smell was delicious, the strings always cutting into your fingers though. Then the great round bales came along, and I suppose the small square ones were a speciality for horse owners.
Cutting the roadside verges that the farmer has been doing, this I appreciate very much, for it makes walking on the side of the lanes so much easier when walking the dog. Someone has been doing it in the village so that the children can walk safely to catch the school bus...

The Weaver of Grass said...

It rained all evening so no grass was cut, which was just as well. As the forecast has now deteriorated and the week is set to be showery, the cutting has been put on hold for the foreseeable future.
Thanks for all your comments. Happy 4th July to all US readers (and Frances, don;t whiaper the celebrations quietly - we have enough problems of our own here at the moment without (perish the thought) still having to deal with any on the other side of the Atlantic.)

Heather said...

Hoping for fine weather soon for the farmer and his hay. It was looking threatening here yesterday and I am pleased I cut both our lawns before it could rain again - the grass needs no encouragement to grow at this time of year. It's about time we all had some good haymaking weather.

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

I love the smell of "haying". When I was little it was all small bales that even a child could lift and carry to the back of the hay wagon. Now it's all huge round bales. But it still smells just as good. I hope the weather cooperates for you!
On a different note: we are thinking of doing some travelling this summer to your neck of the woods. Which airport would be the closest to fly into for the Yorkshire Dales/ Lake District areas? Thanks! -Jenn

The Weaver of Grass said...

I think the farmer has abandoned all hope of haymaking this week as heavy showers are forecast. And so we wait for a new week to see whether there is any improvement. I wonder how long the farmer can hold out before he gives in and makes silage of the field!

Derek Faulkner said...

Pat, so thanks for your comments on my blog. You always make perfect sense and point me in the right direction and if I can end up as well as you have I will be more than happy, you are a real inspiration.
Hay making here in Kent appears to be taking off this week with quite a bit of sunshine and drying winds.