Wednesday, 27 January 2016

India

India is one of the countries I have never visited and know that now I never will.   My first husband had lived there and had no desire to go back.   The farmer takes one look at the insanitary conditions and immediately says 'no way'.   So perhaps that is why is so enjoyed BBC1's 'The Real Marigold Hotel' last night.

For anyone who didn't see it, eight celebrities (4 men and 4 women), all over retirement age, have gone to India for three weeks to investigate what it would really be like to retire there, into an environment where everything is so much cheaper than here.

This programme really follows the two films made about retiring to India - films which I also enjoyed, but which were pure fiction of course.

What I enjoyed most (apart from the absolute total irreverence of Miriam Margoyles) was the amount of India we actually saw.   It is taking place in Jaipur.

I can't wait for next week's episode.   If you didn't watch it I do urge you to catch up on IPlayer before next week.

##On a completely different subject.   I have just watched our local six-o'clock news and there was an item I wanted to share with you to see what you all think.

A Head Teacher in the North of England somewhere has written to parents and asked them not to drop off - or collect- their children to and from school still wearing pyjamas and slippers.   I find this absolutely incredible.   I don't find it acceptable and think that parents could easily get up a quarter of an hour earlier in order to be reasonably dressed for the school run.   I know many parents these days work from home and I also know that there is a tendency for folk who work from home to work in their pyjamas all day.   But to me it is sloppy behaviour and is not setting a good, efficient example to the children on the way they should see school.   I would be really interested in your opinions.  Am I old-fashioned?   I taught in school for many years and I just think it promotes the wrong attitude.

41 comments:

mrsnesbitt said...

Will do Pat. Dx

Doc said...

Our youngest son loved the first film so much that he gave us both of them for Christmas this year. We absolutely loved them but like you we both know that we will never go there.

Cloudia said...

Moving from Hawaii after 30 years wasn't on our agenda, but we are loving N. California. I too dream of India, but farmer is probably correct.

Pondside said...

I will watch for it, though we don't usually see BBC programs for six months to a year after they've run in the UK.

jinxxxygirl said...

Pat i have been wanting to see that movie for quite a while now... it was on my Christmas list but did not come about... Did you know there is a #2 of that movie out too?? I will never go to India either... no money to travel like that...AND i don't think i would want to go there because like the farmer the unsanitary conditions turn me off... Hugs! deb

Mary said...

I so hope we get that program here eventually - I loved the two movies so much.

I have been to India - just Mumbai and Cochin, and only brief visits whilst on that Queen Elizabeth cruise a couple of years ago. I had never wanted to go there knowing about the living conditions and recalling the stories during childhood of the country being so terrible. However, what I did see, I loved (other than the garbage and mothers with babies begging). The colors, the smells, the clothing, the food, the air permeated by everything so different from here where I Iive in near perfect contemporary cleanliness and safety (well most of time I feel safe!). There I felt totally alive, but nervous and as if on the edge - experiencing everything quite opposite to what I see here outside my windows. It was another of those experiences to look back on with wonderful memories. . . . . . but I doubt I'll ever go back again.

Mary -

SandyExpat said...

My son-in-law had to visit India on business and he said the professional people that worked with him were wonderful people however they are the privileged ones. For the vast majority it is quite a terrible life with not much hope of breaking out of the poverty. The journey back and forth from North America is very tiring and not one I would wish to take now we are of a certain age.

Like others I hope the program does come to North America or some kind soul shares it on youtube. Thanks for writing about the program in your blog.

donna baker said...

I watched the first movie but haven't seen the second yet. I was on a plane coming back from Europe once and a couple set across from me and up. I watched them looking at photos on their laptop of their vacation in India and it was gorgeous. Their parents had a house on a lake and they were on a deck out of doors with a large elephant looking at them and touching them with its trunk. It looked like heaven to me.

Frugal in Derbyshire said...

I really enjoyed last night's programme. Miriam has always been the one to watch - she is such an individual individual! I reckon Wayne Sleep is the most likely to opt for India, so far anyway. The "concert" was abit bizarre, but the insight into India and the caste system was really informative.
Can't wait until next week
Have you been watching Jericho?
Gill

Barbara Womack said...

Oh, how I wish we could see that in the US!(maybe next year it will be available on Netflix)
My husband finds India fascinating and would love to visit, although we could never afford that kind of travel. Between the lack of sanitary conditions and the crowds, I must agree with the farmer...definitely "NO WAY"! But, it does look like a most interesting place.
Thanks for sharing. We will have to find a way to see this.

Librarian said...

Never been to India myself, but what I have heard from my sister (who has been on a self-organized trip with a friend), seen on TV and read in books does not really make me want to go.
I am sure there are many great places there to visit, and many wonderful people and other good things, but in my mind, the negative outweighs the positive.

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

I'll change the subject and get onto the pajamas. I am appalled each time I see anyone out and about in their pajamas - and some even are wearing their slippers instead of shoes. They look sloppy and dirty - no matter if they are clean or not - it gives the appearance of not caring for your cleanliness or health. It takes so little time to slip into something meant for public viewing - not to mention for your own sense of self worth. What I have often wonder is - if they do get dressed for the day and then it is time for bed do they simply lie down in their street clothes? If you can dress for bed you can simply dress for leaving the house.

galant said...

First to the real Marigold Hotel prog - yes, it was most enjoyable, husband and I loved it. I thought they'd all be just a load of luvvies, vying for attention, but they're not like that at all. Sadly, most progs which show older people tend to show them ("us" in this case) as dotty old people, not sensible old people. You only have to see a prog about how we're a drain on the NHS and you see a liver-mottled old hand being patted by a young hand. I just wish older people would be treated simply as people and not coldgers or half-wits.
Next, I totally agree - I'd no idea that this was becoming a widespread habit, parents dropping children off while still in their PJs. Is this another trend that is from America? I can't imagine the French or Italians doing this, they change into something smart to put out the rubbish let alone take the children to school.
Margaret P

Thickethouse.wordpress said...

I can''t imagine Americans doing it either......And now I'm going to bite my tongue.

Coppa's girl said...

My father lived in India, with his family, as a child (albeit in privileged surroundings) at a time just before WW1. He had no idea, then, of the dire poverty people lived in, and the only Indians he came into contact with were household servants. He went back in WW2, under very different circumstances when he was in the RAF, and was horrified at the poverty, squalor and the immense gap between the wealthy and the majority of the population. It was one of the few countries he never wanted to revisit.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

I heard that headteacher - Kate Chisholm - on Radio 4. Her stance was calm and thoughtful and I applaud her for sticking her head above the parapet, essentially saying "Well no, if you think that anything goes, you are wrong". There's too much pussy-footing around parents nowadays. Education begins in the home and if parents are slobbing around in their pyjamas they are conveying an extremely unhelpful message to the next generation.

Polly said...

I will definitely be catching up with the Real Marigold, I forgot it was on! I did a rail journey in India six years ago visiting Delhi, Shimla and Rajasthan and loved every minute of it, I think I could retire there. The corruption and poverty is disgraceful though. As for the mums in their pyjamas, I didn't even have a car when my daughters started school. If I had to take my grandson to school at late notice I would quickly put on my "comfies" usually an old tracksuit. I think they could make an effort.

Terry and Linda said...

I like that you are old-fashioned. I think the same way.

Linda

Heather said...

I think it is disgraceful to send a child to school in pyjamas. What are things coming to?
I didn't see the TV programme about India but enjoyed both the films. I don't think I could cope with the poverty that seems to abound out there, though of course there are many fascinating and beautiful things to be seen and enjoyed.

Sol said...

I saw the programme it was well presented. I have been and it is exactly like that, cows eating plastic rubbish in the street. They didnt show all of the beggars that there are there, or the people who have been hurt on purpose to make you feel like you need give them money. BUT..., if you can get over the dirt in the street and things like that it is one of the most awe inspiring countries I have ever been to. So so amazing. The history and the buildings are not to be missed. And the people are so kind and helpful. If you arent into mass population but still want the history, there is always Sri Lanka. The people there are also very nice.

I see people in the supermarket in their pajamas. I dont get it. they have no pride in themselves. And like another commenter said above, you would never see a French or Italian lady taking their kids to school like that.

Mac n' Janet said...

We liked the first Marigold movie very much, but not the 2nd one at all. As to parents taking their kids to school in their pajamas, how horrible, how lazy, no matter what the excuse is, truthfully there is no excuse.

Frances said...

Weaver, you've set quite a diversity of topics in this post.

I have known folks who've moved here from India, and quite a few friends who've traveled to India. The country certainly fascinates me. particularly for the sensory overload. I do wonder what I would make of actually visiting there myself. It is the visual richness that calls. Some of my friends traveled to India a few years ago, and their trip focused on places known for fabulous textiles; their 'hotel" was a special train with a dedicated route.

School age children sent to school in pajamas seems really, really wrong. What are their parents thinking...not just on this particular issue.

Happy to report that last weekend's snow blizzard is a thing of the past. Even the slushy aftermath is just about gone.

xo

Joanne Noragon said...

Ah, Weaver, you bring back a childhood story. My mother had four children to get off to school in the morning (we all walked), and only one car. If she wanted to run errands during the day she took my father to work. One morning she was not about the house when I got up, and that was strange, but we three older went through our morning routine. Mom got home in time to get the youngest up for elementary school. I was in high school. She told me she was late because she had a flat tire. However, two nice gentlemen stopped to help her change it. She took off her spring coat. "MOM!" I exclaimed. Only her VanRaalte nightgown was underneath. That's why her coat was buttoned top to bottom and belted tightly at the waist.

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

Pajamas say one of two things: I am going to bed or I have the flu. Neither one is appropriate out in public. That's just my opinion. I've never been to India, but my husband's grandparents lived there for a little while. I do not imagine they saw the sort of poverty that exists now. -Jenn

Cro Magnon said...

In a lot of small French towns, it isn't uncommon to see people walking about in pyjamas, dressing gown, and slippers. They seem to think it quite normal to do their early morning shopping thus. I find it sloppy and rather 'common'.

I too would love to visit India, but I feel it's too late for various reasons. I should have gone when I was much younger.

angryparsnip said...

One friend when a few years ago and got so sick she spent her whole vacation in hospital there.
I would have like to visit when I was very young but now with all you read in the paper about how women and children are treated. not so much.
As for the pajamas Oh My goodness No ! That is not how you treat your children much less yourself.

cheers, parsnip

Robin Mac said...

Unfortunately we are unlikely to see that programme in Australia for a couple of years. I would love to visit India, but my husband spent some time in Bangladesh and no way is he going anywhere near that continent again!
Do you mean that parents actually get out of their cars in their PJs to drop off their children at school? I can't think of anything more degrading. I was never game to drive anywhere in my PJs in case I had a flat tyre or the car broke down and I would have to expose myself! Don't parents have any pride these days?

Librarian said...

Did you add the bit about pyjamas later to your post? I can't recall it having been there when I wrote my comment about India further up.

The working from home bit is certainly true for many people. Not for me, though. I've been almost exclusively working from home for more than a year in 2011-2012, and always dressed properly before beginning my work day. In December 2012, I started my current job, and now work from home at least one day a week, sometimes too. Again, I always dress properly for that. Not exactly the same as when I go to the office; there, I always turn up in a proper business outfit. At home, it can be a pair of (clean!) jeans and a sweater, or a light dress in the summer, but I never stay in my pyjamas or nightgown longer than around 8:00 when I work.
Not even to the dustbin behind the house would I go without being dressed. Call me old-fashioned, but for me, this has to do just as much with self-esteem as with consideration for others.

Midmarsh John said...

When I saw the report about pyjama wearing parents I though April 1st had arrived already. I just couldn't comprehend such things happen.

Gwil W said...

Once put the bin out in pyjamas. Nowadays they come to empty them a bit later so nowadays I'm there properly dressed with the trash.

The Weaver of Grass said...

\interesting that everyone agrees withme on the school issue - it could be that we are all around the same age (retired) and maybe it is something for young mothers. Self-respect comes high on the list of reasons against - and rightly so. Until I have had my shower and got dressed I don't really feel I can face the day.
Thanks for joining in the debate.

Heather said...

I misread your post about the pyjamas and thought it was the child going to school in pyjamas. Pay attention!! Even so it must be embarrassing for the child to be taken to school by a parent still in pyjamas and slippers and gives a bad impression of that child's upbringing to all concerned.

Margaret Butterworth said...

Re the Real Marigold Hotel: this is available on YouTube for those who don't live in the UK. I'm in Perth and have just enjoyed watching it on my new "smart" TV.

The Weaver of Grass said...

******NOTE MARGARET'S COMMENT AT THE BOTTOM IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE THE UK AND WISH TO WATCH THE REAL MARIGOLD HOTEL.******

Dartford Warbler said...

I certainly agree with you about the school issue.

We visited India many years ago. We loved it. A wonderful assault on all the senses! However, the politics and the remnants of the caste system make it difficult for Western people to understand. I would find it hard to live there on many levels. Having said that, we enjoyed the Real Marigold Hotel and wil
l be watching the next episode.

Gwil W said...

In the war my dad went to India and Ceylon, and returned home with a dose of malaria. Mind you, he wasn't staying at the Marigold Hotel. I expect they serve gin and tonics. I shall try and find some video of the series.

dreamtemples said...

Hi, I'm from India and love reading your blog regularly.I agree with Sol that it is a most awe-inspiring country, It just takes time to get used to it. The scenes that Sol referred to can be seen only in some of the bigger cities.The small towns and villages are not like that at all, but I guess tourists get to see only the better known places. Many of those who visit come back again.The call of India is spiritual.Even for us who were born here this land never ceases to fascinate.
Best wishes,
Sheela

Rachel said...

I only just saw this about the pyjamas on your blog, it wasn't there when I read this post first time. The mum's dont get dressed because they are late up and take the kids to school with their coats over their pyjamas. Of course they should get up earlier. However this is not an ideal world. They don't all seem bad though, the children get to school and they are dressed appropriately. It is just the mums who aren't. The really bad cases are the ones where mums dont get up at all due to drugs and alcohol abuse, the children have no breakfast at the very least, or they don't get to school at all. There are loads more of them than the pyjama clad mums. They are the ones to worry about.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Dreamtemples - thank you for an 'inside' view - it makes interesting reading.
Rachel - a good point, but I still feel that maybe two wrongs don't make a right. They are different issues and they both need tackling. Perhaps, in the case of the Headmistress who sent the letter, she doesn't have children in her school who experience the problems you outline.
Thanks to everyone.

Toffeeapple said...

Here is an article by a blogger whom I read, with an entirely different view from yours about pyjamas at the school gate.

https://katyboo1.wordpress.com/2016/01/27/pyjama-rant-you-would-expect-nothing-less/

Shirley said...



The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is one of my favourites. I've seen it a few times and just recently watched the second one. The movie is based on a novel of that name by Deborah Moggach. As lovely as some of the scenery was depicted and the culture is interesting to see, I have no desire to visit the country. I'll let movies like The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel do the tourism bit for me.
https://youtu.be/dDY89LYxK0w