Thursday, 10 September 2015

It is all go.

In spite of the good, dry forecast for this week, today is the first perfect day for silaging.   It is sunny, breezy and there is a good drying atmosphere.   As I sat in the hairdressers half an hour ago a succession of silage wagons went past - I think most farmers will be doing their third cut of the year.   Mark my words - there will not be a shortage of feed in the coming winter unless it is a drastically cold one.

Our absolutely last cut is down and the contractor is coming to bale and wrap it tomorrow lunch time.   With luck it will all be led in by tea time tomorrow.

There has been a Study Group in our village for thirty years this week-end.   In the first instance it was started by a man called David Hall, who sadly died some years ago.   The idea was to make an in-depth study of our village (there is very early evidence here -hence our 3000BC axe head, which I put on my post some time ago) and eventually to write a book.   The book was written but the Study Group continued.  They now meet once a week during the Winter and have various speakers - for example, we live in a lead mining area too, so it is always interesting to hear about that.  As the years go by the wide spectrum of speakers continues to increase.   Many members have either moved on or sadly died.  Others, like the farmer and me, have just stopped going (me because I find hearing difficult, even with my hearing aid) and the farmer because after a day out in the fresh air he can no longer keep awake!)   Saturday is their thirtieth Birthday Party and all past members have been invited.  (I was secretary for six years) - so that will be the highlight of our week-end.

14 comments:

Mac n' Janet said...

I remember your stone axe, my husband was so envious. I exercise every day in addition to our walking. I didn't when we were in England and oh did it hurt when I started up again. But it's a good hurt.

Frugal in Derbyshire said...

We are members of a group or two. I actually get fed up of there always having to be speakers. Sometime I would be quite happy just having a natter or a brainstorm about the actual reason for being there. I really hate it when I go to a group on Heritage for example, and there is a talk on "My life as an air steward" I want to shout out "I don't care!"
Nice to hear that a group is still going though after all those years.

Frances said...

I've learned a new expression from this post, "led in." I'm not sure if I can find a context to use it myself describing anything in this city...but it will be kept at the ready.

I do like the idea of your study group's having continued to grow as years go by, even if not everyone is able to attend meetings regularly. I imagine that this weekend's celebration will be very enjoyable, and will even add to the area's history.

Best wishes..

Dawn McHugh said...

They have been bayling hay around here, second cut, I hope this means it wont be expensive this year :-)

Heather said...

I know how the farmer feels - I'm usually in bed by 10pm which cuts out many evening do's. The Study Group sounds fascinating - I always want to know what was going on centuries ago wherever I have lived. I hope you enjoy the party meeting up with other members and ex-members.

Mary said...

Great news that the season has been good and there'll be no shortage of feed this coming winter. Glad you are having some sunny, dry and breezy days for drying, baling and wrapping.

Pat, when I read anything about farming I always think of you and your busy farmer. I recently read an extremely positive article on book being reviewed over here - the header caught my eye "A Poetic Shepherd". The author James Rebanks is that Lake District shepherd of Herdwick sheep. I watched a beautiful video of him with his sheep on The Fells/Eden Valley. I then pulled up info online about 'sheep' and was amazed that there are so many breeds - really interesting. I believe you told us that the sheep that winter on your farm are Swaledales - am I correct? They are very attractive from the photos I'm looking at. I may just do post on sheepherding - I loved the Devon sheep in the field around my home when I was a child - the countryside was my favorite place of all.

Anyway dear, just enjoying your farm tales as always - know this is a busy time of year for the farmer. That said I should also make it clear to others that farmers work hard ALL year round - and we thank them for their efforts which mean so much to our lives too!

Hugs - hope the sun continues to shine.
Mary

A Heron's View said...

The third cut is underway over here over here too, which is great because when the farmers do well everybody does well :)

Cro Magnon said...

I like your use of the expression 'led in', it must be a local one.

A book was written about my nearby town, and its outlying villages, but there was very little about where I live. I don't think people kept records here, so much of our history is lost.

thelma said...

Farm machinery was going past the house all yesterday evening till about 10 o clock, piled high with bales of straw.
We have a village historian, though he lives elsewhere now, but he has put all the information on the net. Also a village news letter, the latest asks for apples so that they can be turned into apple juice by a press, to be shared between the grower and the village community centre.

Iftekhar Ahmed said...
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Countryside Tales said...

Not having horses any more I'm rather out of the loop of worrying about hay for the winter. Glad the harvest has been a good one.

Midmarsh John said...

Seems a busy time all round at the moment. 9pm last night I could hear farm machinery on fields both sides of the village.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for all the comments. The expression 'led in' just means to lead in the crop on a tractor and trailer.
Thelma - I love that idea about contributing apples to an apple press.
Cro = I always think one might come across a bit of ancient local history when one is double-digging the garden!

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for all the comments. The expression 'led in' just means to lead in the crop on a tractor and trailer.
Thelma - I love that idea about contributing apples to an apple press.
Cro = I always think one might come across a bit of ancient local history when one is double-digging the garden!