Tuesday, 16 December 2014

Language

The farmer informed me at about eleven o'clock this morning that a load of straw was arriving at a quarter past twelve.   As he has to unload this using his tractor and working from the farm gate it takes quite a long time, so it was arranged that I went into town to do the one or two jobs I had to do and that then I got fish and chips to eat before the straw arrived.   We don't have this very often so that when we do we always enjoy it (with mushy peas and plenty of salt and vinegar - despite health warnings).

So off I duly went, sailed through the jobs I had to do, finding Christmas cake decorations easily (why don't I save them from year to year?  I always mean to and then they go missing, perhaps there is a great stock of them somewhere which will be found after I die and fashioned into a memorial), no queue at the Post Office, paying the newspaper bill for the week was easy and quick.   And so, after ringing the farmer   on my mobile to tell him I was just about to get the fish and chips (he could warm the plates and set the table while I was on my way home) I went into the shop.   

There was only one customer in front of me, obviously a man who knew the staff well, and they were having a laugh and a joke together. I had taken out my hearing aid to speak to the farmer on my mobile (luckily) so the worst of the language was out of my hearing.   But I did hear the shop assistant say several words (they were pretty loud) which I wouldn't dream of saying (or even repeating).   When she saw me coming in she put her hand over her mouth and looked quite embarrassed.

I smiled and put her at her ease and she was charming, commenting on the lovely sunshine and the convenience of having fish and chips for lunch.   But it does beg the question: who was in the right or wrong?   Is such language acceptable these days - particularly from a woman?   Am I the one that is old-fashioned?

I don't care to hear bad language from anyone, always believing that it is often poor vocabulary that causes folk to use it.   But I care to hear it even less when the speaker is a woman.   Is nothing sacred any more or is this a feminist issue that I have missed?


19 comments:

Gwil W said...

I have a dictionary of Victorian bad language. There are words in it you wouldn't believe. Words like eel-skinner for example.

Mac n' Janet said...

Not acceptable in a public place where you're supposed to be serving the public. Not acceptable from a lady under any circumstance. But I'm old fashioned and proud of it.

Balisha said...

Those words seem to be part of normal speech today. They come out so easily. I'm old fashioned, I guess...and as Mac and Janet said...Proud of it.

jinxxxygirl said...

I too am old fashioned. You seem to hear that language nearly every day from nearly every one. I think people hear it so much that they become immune to it and its just accepted. Except by us old fashioned people...lol Hugs! deb

simplesuffolksmallholder said...

It makes me cringe when I hear a mouth full of swearing. Yet it's obviously quite normal to a lot of people. I don't think it's necessary at all, but I'm creeping towards old age too!

Joanne Noragon said...

I'm surprised the shop keeper was so unguarded, even in a seemingly unoccupied shop, save an acquaintance she felt she could be unguarded speaking too. Nevertheless, it is a public shop and she had no idea if a customer would come through the door, as you did.

Heather said...

I'm glad she had the grace to look embarrassed. Those words might possibly be acceptable if she got a nasty burn from the hot fat, but it seems it isn't just gentlemen who are in short supply these days, but ladies too.

A Heron's View said...

Swearing behind the counter is very definitely frowned upon where I live regardless of gender.

Twiggy said...

I don't mind a bit of fruity language, but I think it's a case of a time and a place. I wouldn't swear in my workplace, especially as I work in a first school. I also wouldn't swear in front of my son or Mum, it's a matter of respect.
I hate to see parents effin and jeffin, when they have children with them or even worse aiming it at their children :(
Twiggy

Twiggy said...
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Becca McCallum said...
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Maureen @ Josephina Ballerina said...

Old fashioned in Maryland. And to practice what I preach, I have begun yelling PIG! whenever I might want to use another word. My husband asked me the other day if I called him a pig. Said, no, I was calling the computer cord that keeps coming undone a pig. He said, oh, ok.

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

I don't think it is a feminist issue at all - it is a low regard for oneself and others to use such language, besides showing a lack of intelligence, in my opinion. One can always think of a better way to express one's feelings. Men or women, it is embarrassing to watch them make a fool of themselves, usually trying to "impress" someone - and it never works - just makes the speaker look ridiculous and ignorant.

I'm glad you enjoyed your fish and chips - we have a small restaurant on a little island (a 5 min. ferry ride after a 45 minute drive to the ferry landing) that makes the absolutely best fish and chips - though not served with the mushy peas, usually cole slaw is served here with fish and chips.

Terry and Linda said...

I thank bad language (cussins and such) is never appropriate ever. I'm old fashioned and proud of it!


Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com/?s=The+Adventures+of+Fuzzy+and+Boomer&submit=Search
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

Judy said...

Certainly not acceptable in public. Like I used to tell my young girls when all this feminism stuff started, "Why would you want to lower yourself to be equal to a man?"

Cloudia said...

It is disheartening to hear such from anyone, but it does seem particularly unseemly from a woman.....




ALOHA from Honolulu
ComfortSpiral
<3

Cro Magnon said...

I attended the sort of school where 'swearing' was almost expected. Most of these words were simply regarded as adjectives, and were used regularly. Some words were strictly forbidden, and I still would NEVER use them. We had our standards....That's what an expensive education is for!

Rachel said...

She smiled and chatted to you, that is nice. She had a bit of banter with some colourful language with someone else, all part of the rich tapestry of modern life and at least she had an opinion about something. Enjoy. Let he here who is without sin cast the first stone .....

The Weaver of Grass said...

What an interesting mix of comments - each to his own is the best way I can answer them I think.