Monday, 19 May 2014

Three Bird Stories.

Three bird stories today - two sad ones and then a cheerful one to end with - and a rather tatty photograph but the best I could manage as I hardly dare move nearer for fear of disturbing her.
 
First of all - if you have been reading my blog regularly you will know that the farmer disturbed a robin nesting in a watering can.  She never returned - sadly as there were five eggs in her nest.   Cobwebs grew thickly over the hole, so it was obvious that she hadn't been back.   I have just written an e mail to the rspb asking them whether they think she will start again - I do hope so as we both feel so sad at disturbing her.

Ever since we came back from Northumberland the farmer has noticed a cock pheasant in the long grass of the paddock, more or less in the same place; he didn't seem to be moving.   This morning the farmer went into the paddock and picked him up.   He was unable to move as he had a broken leg, so sadly the farmer had to put him out of his misery.   It did strike me how wild animals and birds who are injured just seem to stand and await their fate.

Thirdly, a lovely happy piece of news.   Mrs pheasant,
who nested just outside our front door, has brought off her brood.  Just after lunch today I was upstairs and the farmer was coming downstairs when he called for me to look out of the bedroom window.   There she was on the front lawn with at least seven babies.   There is plenty of cover for them as the plants are growing quite tall, but we suspect that she will take them out of the garden and into the field tonight as dusk falls.  I took the photograph - the best I could get.

Opposite the farm, on the lane where the waller rebuilt some of the stone walls a couple of weeks ago, he cut down a bush and left the debris on the lane side.   This morning the farmer went over the lane intending to gather up all the twiggy bits to burn on the bonfire.  Just in time he noticed another hen pheasant sitting among the branches on the deep grass, so he has left well alone.   Let's hope she brings her brood off too. 

15 comments:

Pondside said...

Oh, the responsibility of sharing your farm with wildlife! For a long time we couldn't use our front door because of the nests in the eaves - worth the inconvenience though, when we saw the little ones start out on their own.

Crafty Green Poet said...

sad that the robin was disturbed, hope she can bring up another brood. lovely that the pheasant has fot young!

simplesuffolksmallholder said...

We had a blackbird in the cement mixer one year, luckily we noticed in time.

Heather said...

So pleased about the pheasant family and grateful that the farmer was on hand to put the pheasant out of his misery. Mrs Robin will probably start another nest. Yesterday I came across a tiny bluetit fledgling on the lawn. I went to lift it to a safer place on the bird table but it flew into the border. I think it had hatched from the nestbox over our kitchen window. The rest of the family were nearby and calling to eachother.

Em Parkinson said...

I once disturbed a Robin's nest but luckily they stayed put. This was pre-Snippet which is the only reason they survived!

Twiglet said...

Great news about your pheasants - hope they survive in the "wild".

angryparsnip said...

When I try to take the new baby quail the photos never come out because they look just like stones that move.
Loved the pheasant photo.
I think I would have tried to fix the pheasant's leg. I know that is bad.

cheers, parsnip

Robin Mac said...

What a lovely story to finish with - I am so glad the babies have hatched. So sad about the others, but I suppose that is what happens in the wild. Cheers

Cloudia said...

We need to hear good simple stories like these to reconnect with the Earth. You are a wonderful ambassador for farm life, animals, and humane hearts, P



ALOHA from Honolulu
ComfortSpiral

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

What luck that you and the farmer are careful of the nesting birds - they are fortunate to have caring neighbors.

Cro Magnon said...

That's how I like to start my day; a feel-good story about our feathered partners. Out here Pheasants don't stand a chance; the hunters release a few each year, then shoot them ON THE GROUND; a mortal sin back home!

thelma said...

Gosh Cro-Magnon that would make me mad, shooting the pheasants on the ground, you can kill them in the air, with one hand tied behind the back and one's eyes closed, and that is bad enough...

mrsnesbitt said...

Ah the highs and lows of countrylife pat! Our housemartins have returned and after a spot of DIY on the nest are settling in.

Willow said...

Wonderful to hear about and see the baby pheasant !

The Weaver of Grass said...

As you so rightly say Cro - shooting pheasants from the ground is absolutely forbidden and dangerous too - they should be well up into the air to avoid shooting a human by mistake!
Thanks for calling. Mrs Pheasant is still in the garden with her babies - I saw her when I took Tess for her afternoon walk.